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How does saliva break down food?

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on 17 December 2013

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Transcript of How does saliva break down food?

How does
saliva
break down food?

What is saliva ?
What does this have to do with Chemistry
Saliva contains the enzyme amylase that breaks some starches down into maltose and dextrin. Thus, digestion of food occurs within the mouth, even before food reaches the stomach.
What type of reaction is it?
This is a decomposition reaction. this is because the saliva is breaking down the food into smaller pieces so that it can be digested easier than if it was in bigger pieces
The chemical reaction for saliva and bread
The starch in this picture is the bread and the amylase is the saliva. When the two come together the amylase breaks down the starch and it becomes maltose
watery liquid secreted into the mouth by glands, providing lubrication for chewing and swallowing, and aiding digestion.Human saliva is 99.5% water, while the other 0.5% consists of electrolytes, mucus, glycoproteins, enzymes, and antibacterial compounds such as secretory IgA and lysozyme.The enzymes found in saliva are essential in beginning the process of digestion of dietary starches and fats. These enzymes also play a role in breaking down food particles entrapped within dental crevices, protecting teeth from bacterial decay
Special thanks to:
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Wikipedia
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