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Comparative Education

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Keri B

on 10 May 2011

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Transcript of Comparative Education

Comparative Education
Chapter 1 What is comparative education?
it draws on multiple discilpines to examine education in developed and developing countries (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p.6). Comparing education is similar to a Venn diagram because you are comparing two or more countries to determine the similarities and differences. There are different stages in comparative education.
First stage: this stage is known as "the period of travelers' tales" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p.7) People were curious which led them to explore various parts of the world.
Second stage: occurred during the 19th century when educators traveled to different countries to observe different instructional practices to see what would be useful to bring back to their sites.
Third stage: occurred during the 20th century. "...an awareness that what works in one country might not necesarily work in another" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 9).




George Bereday pointed out that by comparing and learning about various cultures and people that it ultimately helps the one searching know more about oneself (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 11). In the 80s, there was a focus on "the study of educational exapansion and reform in different countries ..." (Kubow & Kussom, 2007, p. 13). In the 40s and 50s comparative education was a course that teachers took for preservice education. Over the years it has been offered as an elective, dropped, or has been attached with other classes. Comparative education has "been the subject of debate" among educators due to the various definitions (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 18). The Council of Learned Societies in Education (CLSE) "identifies comparative educationas one of themajor approaches that defines the character and methods of the foundations of education" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 20).
interpretive perspective
normative perspective
critical perspective In 2001, a report noted that American students were not very area in the area of international issues. (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 25). "Comparative education ... is geared toward enrichment and improvement" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 26).
Theory in Comparative Education
Chapter 2 This chapter focuses on discussing major theories that are important to comparative education.
Sturctural Functionist theory
- Modernization theory
-Human Capital theory
Marxist theory
- Dependency theory
- Liberation theory "Teachers may find modernization theory especially useful in understanding rhetoric that connects individual students' progress with society's general readiness for the future" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 39). "The dependency and liberation theories have been very influential in comparative education (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 42). "Teachers are increasingly confronted with issues related as how to deal fairly in classrooms whose students bring a wide range of cultural perspectives, biases, norms, and beliefs" ( Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 66). Comparative Education
Chapter 1 "Comparative education draws upon multiple disciplines to examine education in developed and developing countries" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 6). Comparing education between two or more countries to determine their similarities and differences. There are different stages of comparative education.
First stage: is known as "the period of travelors' tales" where curiosity and interest in the unknown prompted exploration in various countries around the world (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p.7).
Second stage: occurred in the 19th century when educators traveled to different countries to observe practices and differeing ideas that could be useful to where they taught.
Third stage: occurred in the 20th century. Is known as "the best ideas and practices". During this stage there was an anwareness, "that what works in one country might not necessarily work in another" ( Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 9). George Bereday pointed out that by comparing education and learning about various cultures and people that it would ultimately help the one searching know more about oneself (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 11). In the 80s, there was a focus on "the study of educational expansion and reform in different countries and to the equality of educational opportunities...in various parts of the world" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p.13). In the 40s and 50s,comparative education was a course that teachers took for preservice education. However, through the years, it has been either offered as an elective, dropped, or been attached to other classes (Kubow &Fossum, 2007, p. 17). Comparative education has "been the subject of debate" among educators due to the various definitions (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 18). The Council of Learned Societies in Education (CLSE) "identifies comparative educationas one of themajor academic approaches that defines the character and methods of the foundation education" (Kubow &Fossum, 2007, p. 21).
interpretive perspective
normative perspective
critical perspective
In 2001, a report noted that American students were not very aware when there were international issues (Kubow &Fossum, 2007, p. 25). "Comparative education...is geared toward enrichment and improvement" (Kubow & Fossum, 2007, p. 26).
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