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Librarians

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Yvea Ng

on 10 December 2012

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Transcript of Librarians

A Brief History Bureau of Labor Statistics (2010) Duties of a Librarian Librarians in the Field Conclusion Education An undergraduate bachelor's degree
A Master's in Library Science
(only 56 accredited programs in US)
Ph.D. sometimes required Ancient Greece and Egypt Ethics and Librarians Organize library material Two types of librarians: Librarians tend to be underestimated! American Library Association
(ALA) Founded on October 6th, 1876 in Philadelphia
ALA works to promote library services and funding
Currently more than 60,000 members
students, librarians (including retired ones and international ones), trustees, and friends
Medieval and Renaissance Vatican Library Colonial America Post Civil War Number of Jobs- 156,000 Entry level Education- Master's Degree Median Pay- $54,500 per year Key Qualities of a Successful Librarain Active listener
Communication Skills
Computer Skills Interpersonal Skills
Problem-solving Skills
Reading comphrension Choose library material Help patrons Plan programs Conduct Research School/ Public Librarians Special Librarians Sometimes called "media specialists"
38% work in public schools/libraries (full time)
4% in private schools
17% in colleges/universities
Often have the role of teaching students how to use library resources
Also help teachers develop lesson plans
May require teaching license Sometimes referred to as "information personnel"
Do NOT work in educational or public settings
found working in law firms, hospitals, museums,
degrees in this area of specialization
Main role is to provide their organization with accurate info and research Mission Statement:
“The object of the American Library Association shall be to promote library service and librarianship. To provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”
III. We protect each library user's right to privacy and confidentiality with respect to information sought or received and resources consulted, borrowed, acquired or transmitted.

VII. We distinguish between our personal convictions and professional duties and do not allow our personal beliefs to interfere with fair representation of the aims of our institutions

VIII. We strive for excellence in the profession by maintaining and enhancing our own knowledge and skills, Code of Ethics Stereotypes Public perception has changed over the centuries In the beginning: Eventually... Librarians were mostly respected men (priest, monks) held up to high standards Libraries became accessible to the public Women grew to dominate the field Most librarians are perceived as women
- helpful, knowledgeable, bossy Studies show that the librarian occupation is underestimated, especially by young adults and students - 60% of first year college students believed that librarians did not require a university education (2001)
- technology vs librarians (shortage in librarians?) Ethical Dilemmas Privacy:
-no records kept
-controversial Patriot Act Providing accurate info Blindly serve clients vs duties to society High level of education Provide a service to society Technical skills needed Face ethical dilemmas regularly Interviewee B Interviewee C How long have you been a librarian?
Two years Have you ever received any ethical training?
Yes, during grad school coursework in library ethics and from ALA Is it ever acceptable to lie?
Yes How often do ethical dilemmas surface?
Weekly Do you consider yourself a professional?
Yes Literature Review (Re)Positioning Librarians: How Young People View the Information Sector More than 2,000 students entering their first year of university studies completed questionnaires about the work roles, future employment prospects, educational requirements, status, and starting salaries of twelve occupations. Their responses were compared with U.S. and Canadian government labor-force projections. The results revealed a complex interplay of gender relations in the students' perceptions of the occupational world and their roles within it. The results also revealed an interesting positioning of the job title "librarian" relative to other fields. Unlike their assessment of the other occupations included in the study, the students considerably underestimated the level of education required to be a librarian (most did not believe that librarians require a university education). They also underestimated librarians' average starting salary and rated the occupation's social status and future prospects to be lower than the other job titles. Taken together, the results indicate that young people beginning their university studies hold views about career prospects in the information sector that are consistent with some labor force analysts' views of occupational winners and losers. The students see status, opportunity, and success to be attainable in fields such as computer engineering and systems analysis. Unfortunately, they view the occupational present and future for librarians in a somewhat dimmer light, a worrisome result in view of labor-force data that suggest reasonably strong salary and employment opportunities for this occupation in both the United States and Canada. The implications of these findings for library and information science (LIS) education are discussed in the context of gender and identity politics. Literature
Review Much of the intellectual work of librarians takes place behind closed doors, away from library users. In brief interviews conducted with 106 adults in two Canadian public libraries, only 34 percent of interviewees (n = 36) and 40 percent of responses (n = 52 of a total of 131 responses; some individuals provided more than one answer) identified library staff as being responsible for collection development. Other answers included "the public," committees of community leaders, government officials, publishers, preexisting lists, and library users themselves. Most respondents indicated that they were guessing. They frequently used mental models to generate answers. This article argues that part of the misunderstanding of the work of librarians might be attributed to its hidden nature. It then considers why the public does not know that librarians select materials and the implications of these findings with respect to the image of librarians, the recruitment of librarians, and the staffing and funding of libraries. Behind Closed Doors: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Librarians and the Hidden Intellectual Work of Collection Development in Canadian Public Libraries Allocation of resources Literature Review The Librarian's Duty of Care: Emerging Professionalism or Can of Worms? The issue of whether librarians and related information workers can and should be held accountable for negligent misinformation is explored here. The article examines case studies that highlight the issue of accountability, discusses accountability, and relates it to concepts such as responsibility and duty of care. It also discusses the customary arguments against holding librarians accountable for misinformation, namely, the lack of contract between librarian and patron and the distinction generally drawn between information "intermediaries," such as librarians, and "knowledge workers," such as lawyers and accountants. One of the conclusions is that the ethical approach taken by the profession has undergone a shift in recent years, partly as a result of certain legal decisions and partly as a result of changes in the profession, for example, the need for librarians to formulate online searches on behalf of clients and interpret search results. Existing codes of ethics and whether they are appropriate to associations that claim professional status are also discussed.
"American Library Association." American Library Association. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.ala.org/>.
"A Brief History of Librarians and Image." A Brief History. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://home.earthlink.net/~cyberresearcher/History.htm>.
"Eternal Egypt." Eternal Egypt. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.eternalegypt.org/EternalEgyptWebsiteWeb/HomeServlet?ee_website_action_key=action.display.module>.
Ferguson, John, and John Weckert. "The Librarian's Duty of Care: Emerging Professionalism or Can of Worms?" The Library Quarterly 68.4 (1998): 365-89. JSTOR. The University of Chicago Press. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/4309244>.
Harris, Roma, and Margaret Ann Wilkinson. "George T. Potter Library." Journal of Education for Library and Information Science 42.4 (2001): 289-307. JSTOR. Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE). Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40323997>.
"Library of Alexandria (ancient Library, Alexandria, Egypt)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/14417/Library-of-Alexandria>.
Mason, Moya K. "Ethics of Librarianship: Libraries, Intellectual Freedom, and Censorship in the Age of Technology." Ethics of Librarianship: Libraries, Intellectual Freedom, and Censorship in the Age of Technology. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.moyak.com/papers/ethics-librarianship.html>.
Nilsen, Kirsti, and Lynne (E. F.) McKechnie. "Behind Closed Doors: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Librarians and the Hidden Intellectual Work of Collection Development in Canadian Public Libraries." The Library Quarterly 72.3 (2002): 294-325. JSTOR. The University of Chicago Press. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/40039761>.
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Librarians. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm> Works Cited How long have you been a librarian?
Two years Have you ever received any ethical training?
Yes, while studying for my master's Is it ever acceptable to lie?
Yes How often do ethical dilemmas surface?
Weekly Do you consider yourself a professional?
Yes Interviewee A How long have you been a librarian?
One year Have you ever received any ethical training?
Yes, during courses in library school Is it ever acceptable to lie?
No How often do ethical dilemmas surface?
A moderate amount Do you consider yourself a professional?
Yes
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