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Copy of The Shivering Tree

The great adventures of Nanabush
by

Matthew Giardetti

on 18 October 2013

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Transcript of Copy of The Shivering Tree

The Shivering Tree

Author: John Mcleod
By: Geordan, Jenn, Geoff
Backround Information
-
The Backround of this story is based on Ojibwa mythology

- John Mcleod wrote this short story as a modern retelling of a trickster tale.

- Nanabush (a well-known character within Ojibwa mythology) is a half spirit, half human that is both creator and spoiler, hero and clown.
The Setting of the Story
The Setting of this story takes place mainly within a forest, along a river in the early days of Canada.

The time of this story took place before the white folk and quite possibly before the First Nation groups were formed throughout the country.
Perspective of the story
This story is written in a narrator's perspective. If the story happened to have been told in Nanabush's perspective the reader would be dumbfounded by how annoying Nanabush would be, there leading the reader away from the story's overall message, and resulting in the reader to go crazy and throw the book across the room.
Main Characters
Antagonist
Protagonist
Nanabush
The Juggler
Nanabush
The Juggler
Arrogant:

"Goodness me but I'm a bright fellow"
(McLeod 5).
"It's a fortunate thing for that I'm such a
clever fellow" (McLeod 6).
Mature:
"Nanabush went about his work of making the world what it was meant to be. He never gave The Juggler another thought" (McLeod 15)
Arrogant:
"That's me all right, Old one, The juggler said. Tell Nanabush if you like to. Maybe I'll take his ears this time" (McLeod 13)
"I am a Great Sorcerer, The Juggler said. I can defeat anything or anyone" (McLeod 14).

Sly:
If he comes to me, I just might take his new eyes too. I did it before and I can do it again" (McLeod 13).
The Theme Tree

Being the Bigger Person
"'The Juggler,' Nanabush thought. 'If I ever meet up with that theving rascal, he will regret the day his parents met. He will ned more than an extra pair of eyes when I get through with him'" (McLeod 12).
"'You've much work to do. You are the teacher. the helper of all living things. Go about your work, Grandson. Don't seek out enemies'" (McLeod 12).
"Nanabush walked away, but not to the rim of the world. He just plain walked away and didn't come back" (McLeod 15).
Literary
Devices
Simile:
1. "'Restless As The Wind'" (McLeod 6).
2. "Spinning like a top" (McLeod 6).
3. "As Quick as lightning" (McLeod 6).
Situational Irony:
Nanabush continuosly states how smart he is and then get tricked by The Juggler.

Dramatic Irony:
Nanabush challenges his apperance so The Juggler doesn not recognize him but the readers of the story know it is actually Nanabush
Epiphany:
"'I've been a fool, a vain, yes... even a blind fool. With both my eyes in my head, I was blind'" (McLeod 8).

Foreshadowing:
"Long fringe that fluttered and shivered in the wind" (McLeod 5).
"A tree that never rests, whose leaves and braches still shake and shiver even when the air is still and quiet" (McLeod 15).
Main Conflict of the Story

Man Vs. Self
WHYY??
The main conflict of the story is Man vs. Self because throughout the story Nanabushs' real enemy was himself for being so cocky and arrogant and that is what got him into trouble.
How does this Story relate to the lives of teenagers?
I think that it relate to the life of teenagers alot because most teenagers think they know everything and there cocky and such, just how Nanabush is cocky. This is probably why there is so much drama in the teenage years.
It is Now Time For Discussion Questions!
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