Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Macbeth: Act 2 Scene 2

No description
by

Ravin Thakrar

on 15 September 2010

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Macbeth: Act 2 Scene 2

Macbeth
Act 2 Scene 2 Overview Lady Macbeth is excited by the murder

Awaits the return of her husband

Concern over whether he will kill Duncan

Macbeth returns with the soldiers' daggers

Should have been left at the scene of the crime.

Macbeth believes he heard Duncan's sons talk in their sleep

One cried 'murder' and they both also prayed for the guilt of Macbeth's sin Lady Macbeth orders Macbeth to clean up the evidence
Macbeth is in a state of shock and does nothing








Lady Macbeth smears blood over the faces of Duncan's servants When she returns, she washes her hands and orders Macbeth to be calm.

The couple hears a loud knocking at the south entry

Return to their room to be away from suspicious eyes SCENE II. The same.

Enter LADY MACBETH

LADY MACBETH

That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold;
What hath quench'd them hath given me fire.
Hark! Peace!
It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman,
Which gives the stern'st good-night. He is about it:
The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms
Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd
their possets,
That death and nature do contend about them,
Whether they live or die.

MACBETH

[Within] Who's there? what, ho!

LADY MACBETH

Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,
And 'tis not done. The attempt and not the deed
Confounds us. Hark! I laid their daggers ready;
He could not miss 'em. Had he not resembled
My father as he slept, I had done't.

Enter MACBETH
My husband!

MACBETH

I have done the deed. Didst thou not hear a noise?

LADY MACBETH

I heard the owl scream and the crickets cry.
Did not you speak?

MACBETH

When?

LADY MACBETH

Now.

MACBETH

As I descended?

LADY MACBETH

Ay.

MACBETH

Hark!
Who lies i' the second chamber?

LADY MACBETH

Donalbain.

MACBETH

This is a sorry sight.

Looking on his hands

LADY MACBETH

A foolish thought, to say a sorry sight.

MACBETH

There's one did laugh in's sleep, and one cried
'Murder!'
That they did wake each other: I stood and heard them:
But they did say their prayers, and address'd them
Again to sleep.

LADY MACBETH

There are two lodged together.

MACBETH

One cried 'God bless us!' and 'Amen' the other;
As they had seen me with these hangman's hands.
Listening their fear, I could not say 'Amen,'
When they did say 'God bless us!'

LADY MACBETH

Consider it not so deeply.

MACBETH

But wherefore could not I pronounce 'Amen'?
I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'
Stuck in my throat.

LADY MACBETH

These deeds must not be thought
After these ways; so, it will make us mad.

MACBETH

Methought I heard a voice cry 'Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care,
The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

LADY MACBETH

What do you mean?

MACBETH

Still it cried 'Sleep no more!' to all the house:
'Glamis hath murder'd sleep, and therefore Cawdor
Shall sleep no more; Macbeth shall sleep no more.'

LADY MACBETH

Who was it that thus cried? Why, worthy thane,
You do unbend your noble strength, to think
So brainsickly of things. Go get some water,
And wash this filthy witness from your hand.
Why did you bring these daggers from the place?
They must lie there: go carry them; and smear
The sleepy grooms with blood.

MACBETH

I'll go no more:
I am afraid to think what I have done;
Look on't again I dare not.

LADY MACBETH

Infirm of purpose!
Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead
Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood
That fears a painted devil. If he do bleed,
I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal;
For it must seem their guilt.

Exit. Knocking within

MACBETH

Whence is that knocking?
How is't with me, when every noise appals me?
What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes.
Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
The multitudinous seas in incarnadine,
Making the green one red.

Re-enter LADY MACBETH

LADY MACBETH

My hands are of your colour; but I shame
To wear a heart so white.

Knocking within
I hear a knocking
At the south entry: retire we to our chamber;
A little water clears us of this deed:
How easy is it, then! Your constancy
Hath left you unattended.

Knocking within
Hark! more knocking.
Get on your nightgown, lest occasion call us,
And show us to be watchers. Be not lost
So poorly in your thoughts.

MACBETH

To know my deed, 'twere best not know myself.

Knocking within
Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst!

Exeunt
SCENE II. The same.
Enter LADY MACBETH

LADY MACBETH
That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold;
What hath quench'd them hath given me fire.
Hark! Peace!
It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman,
Which gives the stern'st good-night. He is about it:
The doors are open; and the surfeited grooms
Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd
their possets,
That death and nature do contend about them,
Whether they live or die.

MACBETH [Within] Who's there? what, ho!

LADY MACBETH
Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,
And 'tis not done. The attempt and not the deed
Confounds us. Hark! I laid their daggers ready;
He could not miss 'em. Had he not resembled
My father as he slept, I had done't.

Enter MACBETH

My husband!

MACBETH I have done the deed. Didst thou not hear a noise?

LADY MACBETH
I heard the owl scream and the crickets cry.
Did not you speak?

MACBETH When?

LADY MACBETH Now.

MACBETH As I descended?

LADY MACBETH Ay.

MACBETH Hark!
Who lies i' the second chamber?

LADY MACBETH Donalbain.

MACBETH This is a sorry sight. (Looking on his hands )

LADY MACBETH A foolish thought, to say a sorry sight.

MACBETH
There's one did laugh in's sleep, and one cried
'Murder!'
That they did wake each other: I stood and heard them:
But they did say their prayers, and address'd them
Again to sleep.

LADY MACBETH There are two lodged together.

MACBETH
One cried 'God bless us!' and 'Amen' the other;
As they had seen me with these hangman's hands.
Listening their fear, I could not say 'Amen,'
When they did say 'God bless us!'

LADY MACBETH Consider it not so deeply.

MACBETH But wherefore could not I pronounce 'Amen'?
I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'
Stuck in my throat.

LADY MACBETH
These deeds must not be thought
After these ways; so, it will make us mad.

MACBETH
Methought I heard a voice cry 'Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care,
The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

LADY MACBETH What do you mean?

MACBETH
Still it cried 'Sleep no more!' to all the house:
'Glamis hath murder'd sleep, and therefore Cawdor
Shall sleep no more; Macbeth shall sleep no more.'

LADY MACBETH
Who was it that thus cried? Why, worthy thane,
You do unbend your noble strength, to think
So brainsickly of things. Go get some water,
And wash this filthy witness from your hand.
Ahy did you bring these daggers from the place?
They must lie there: go carry them; and smear
The sleepy grooms with blood.

MACBETH
I'll go no more:
I am afraid to think what I have done;
Look on't again I dare not.

LADY MACBETH Infirm of purpose!
Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead
Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood
That fears a painted devil. If he do bleed,
I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal;
For it must seem their guilt.

Exit. Knocking within

MACBETH
Whence is that knocking?
How is't with me, when every noise appals me?
What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes.
Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
The multitudinous seas in incarnadine,
Making the green one red.

Re-enter LADY MACBETH

LADY MACBETH
My hands are of your colour; but I shame
To wear a heart so white.

Knocking within

I hear a knocking
At the south entry: retire we to our chamber;
A little water clears us of this deed:
How easy is it, then! Your constancy
Hath left you unattended.

Knocking within

Hark! more knocking.
Get on your nightgown, lest occasion call us,
And show us to be watchers. Be not lost
So poorly in your thoughts.

MACBETH To know my deed, 'twere best not know myself.

Knocking within

Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst!

Exeunt Lady Macbeth feels bold and fierce, and on fire with passion, unlike the tired and sleeepy servants who have also drunk alcohol Shows that she would be willing to commit the murder herself, but also shows for the first time that she is vulnerable She is listening for something, and decides that the owl's screeching is nature's own death bell, a good omen that the murder would take place at that moment.
People were very supersitious at the time and the screeching of an owl was meant to signify someone's death. She has doubts in Macbeth, believing that he is so full of fear that he wouldn't see the daggers in plain sight. Guilt influences Macbeth's thinking and believes that his guilt and his blody hand were seen by the servants through the door. Lady Macbeth 'scolds' Macbeth in a way, saying that if he continues to talk like that both of them will go crazy. Shows behaviour that is uncommon of seventeenth century women. Slight mocking tone and use of the word brain-sickly to describe his thoughts The "filthy witness" is the blood of Duncan, which acts as a witness to Macbeth's crime, but as Lady Macbeth is saying this, she sees another "witness": Macbeth is still carrying the grooms' daggers, so she commands him to put htem back with the groom and smear the grooms with blood, so as to imply that they commited the murder. Macbeth shows fear and paralysed with the horror of what he has done, and defies his wife and refuses to do what she asks him. As result, Lady Macbeth uses patronising words and says "only children are afraid of the sleeping or the dead" Lady Macbeth uses harsh words to spite Macbeth, and afterwards leaves to dispose of the incriminating evidence. More uncivil behaviour isuse, and also a clear perception of the role reversal between husband and wife. Macbeth hears a knocking but can do nothing but stare at his hands. His guilt increases the intensity of his thoughts as he believes that no amount of water can cleanse his hands of he murder, and that he would make the seas turn red because of the blood. Lady Macbeth uses more bitter words to insult Macbeth, saying that he has a white heart which is a heart with no blood, but aalso white this is the colour associated with surrender, and people of that sort are described as cowards which is what Lady Macbeth is implying Lady Macbeth takes her husband away to wash up, believing i would only take a little blood for them to be clean and make them innocent, but Macbeth is lost in his own thoughts Macbeth is saying here that if he fully understands what he has done, he will see what a monster he has become, and he doesn't want to know that monster. Macbeth is showing remorse and regret for waht he has done, but in his wife's eyes, these are signs of weakness withn Macnbeth.
In the last line, Macbeth states that he wish nothing had happened and wishes that Duncan would wake up from the knocking, and all says, "I wish I could wake him! I would if I could!" Portrayl of Lady Macbeth Typical Views of 17th
Century Women Subservient inferior To be a 'Primary Care Giver' housewife Husband has control over wife Little control over events A 'trophy' that should be
seen and not heard Masculine Independent Manipulative Machiavellian Controlling Aggressive Dominating Evil Ambitious Determined Strive to achieve what she wants
no matter the consequences Powerful, Threatening
Full transcript