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Identifying Verbals

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Jordan Pankey

on 3 March 2015

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Transcript of Identifying Verbals

Identifying Verbals
A verbal is a type of verb; instead of functioning as a verb, verbals act as adjectives or nouns when used in a sentence.

Confusing, right? They can be tricky to spot, so pay attention to this guide!
What are Verbals?
An infinitive is a verb form that can be used as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Most of the time, you can identify infinitives by looking for this formula:
Infinitives
Participles are words that end in
-ing or -ed
but function like an
adjective
in the sentence.
#2: Participles
#1: Gerunds
So, how do I make sure it's really a gerund?
1. Look for an
-ing
or
-ed
ending. Found one?
Look closer...

2. What is the word's job in the sentence?

Does it tell you what the person/thing in the sentence is doing?
If so, that's just a
verb
, not a participle!


Is it a thing (physical or idea) in the sentence? Does it function as a noun?
If so, that's a
gerund
, not a participle!


Does it describe a person, place, or thing in the sentence by telling you which one, what kind, or how many?
If so, it's a present participle!
So, how do I make sure it's really a participle?
1. Did you find the word to in a sentence? (Only "to" not "two" or "too") Keep looking....

2. Look at the word after to. Is it a noun or pronoun (person, place, thing, idea?)
If so, it's probably a
preposition
, not an infinitive

3. Is it a verb? Do you have the formula to + a verb?

If so, you probably have an infinitive!
So, how do I make sure it's really an infinitive?
1. The baby is sleeping in the room next door.
2. Sleeping is my favorite hobby.
3.The sleeping gazelle was not prepared for the lion's attack.

4. My sister is always studying for her French class.
5. Mrs. Smith said that studying is the best way to improve your test grades.

6. Working takes up most of my time on the weekdays.
7. But reading is how I relax on the weekends.
1. The horses were trotting down the lane.
2. The trotting horses are my favorite part of the parade!

3. The baby abandoned her lollipop at the park.
4. The police officers searched the abandoned warehouse.

5. Pirates are known for burying their treasure.
6. Most of the buried treasure has never been found.
Participle or No?
1. I am going to the store.
2. I love to go shopping on the weekends.

3. The camel knelt at the pool to drink.
4. Send the letter to Mom.

5. I am going to Tampa this summer.
6. The best time to visit Florida is December through April.
Infinitive or No?
Quick Refresher:

Noun
- a person, place, thing, or idea.
Verb
- tells what the noun does (action or helping)
Adjective
- describes a noun or pronoun. Answers the questions:

what kind? which one? how many? how much?
Gerunds are words that end in
-ing
but function like a
noun
in the sentence.

Example:
Running
is my least favorite form of exercise.
Just because a word ends in -ing, it is not automatically a gerund. Most words that end in
-ing
are just regular verbs. Or, they can be another type of verbal. You must look further than the
-ing
ending...
1. Look for any words with an
-ing
ending. Found one?
Look closer...

2. What is the word's job in the sentence?

Does it tell you what the person/thing in the sentence is doing?
If so, that's just a
verb
, not a gerund!

Does it describe a person, place, or thing in the sentence by telling you which one, what kind, or how many?
If so, that's a
participle
, not a gerund!

It is a thing (physical or idea) in the sentence? Does it function as a noun?
If so, it's a gerund!
Gerund or No?
Example: The
smiling
child waved at the
passing
bus.
Just because a word ends in -ing or -ed, it is not automatically a participle. Most words that end in
-ing
or
-ed
are just regular verbs. Or, they could be a gerund, which we just talked about! So, identify the words, but look further!
to + [a verb]
Example: Shala likes
to skate
but does not like
to ski.
Just because you see the word "to" in a sentence, it doesn't mean you have found an infinitive. To is a common preposition and you could be looking at a prepositional phrase. So, look closer to be sure.
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