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The Anatomy of an Essay

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by

Joel Agee

on 5 August 2016

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Transcript of The Anatomy of an Essay

Overview
the anatomy
MLA Format
MLA HEADING
- double spaced
- only on the first page
- your personal and
class information
ESSAY TITLE
- on its own line
- centered
- no extra space
above it or below it
- same font as the rest
of the essay
PAGE NUMBERS
- in the document's
header space
- your last name
- page number
- on every page
PAGE NUMBERS
- continue the numbers
to include your
Works Cited page
- i.e. don't start over with
page 1 here
ESSAY TEXT
-
all

double spaced
- 12 point font
- simple fonts only:
times new roman,
arial, calibri, palatino,
helvetica, etc.
THESIS STATEMENT
INTRODUCTION
PARAGRAPH
BODY
PARAGRAPH #1
BODY PARAGRAPH #2
BODY
PARAGRAPH #3
CONCLUSION
PARAGRAPH
TOPIC
OPINION
PLAN
what the essay is about
your opinion
about the topic
how
you're going to prove it
your

reasons
(a.k.a. divisions)
why you think so
list your reasons
(a.k.a. divisions)
in the order
you'll discuss them in
BODY PARAGRAPH 1 / TOPIC SENTENCE 1
TOPIC
OPINION
PLAN
same topic as thesis
same opinion
as thesis
only
reason #1
(division #1)
from your thesis statement's plan
BODY PARAGRAPH 2 / TOPIC SENTENCE 2
TOPIC
OPINION
PLAN
same topic as thesis
same opinion
as thesis
only
reason #2
(division #2)
from your thesis statement's plan
BODY PARAGRAPH 3 / TOPIC SENTENCE 3
TOPIC
OPINION
PLAN
same topic as thesis
same opinion
as thesis
only
reason #3
(division #3)
from your thesis statement's plan
CONCLUSION / RESTATE THESIS
TOPIC
OPINION
PLAN
same topic as thesis
same opinion
as thesis
all three reasons
(divisions)
from the thesis in the same order
includes all the same parts, but word them differently
TRANSITIONS CAN SHOW CHANGES
THESIS STATEMENT
+ TOPIC SENTENCES
Your Thesis Statement
is the most important sentence in your essay
Everything must connect to your thesis and agree with it.
Your Topic Sentences
support, echo and in some ways copy your thesis.
The Topic Sentences are the big reasons behind your thesis.
Prove
your Topic Sentences (with quotes and commentary) and you
will prove your Thesis Statement.
MLA FORMAT
Quality essays
have the right "look" to them.
MLA
is a formatting style that most colleges agree to use.
MLA
makes your writing look professional, considerate
and polished.
(a.k.a. Rationale)
Thesis Statement
+ Topic Sentences

Transitions
CLICK ON
A TOPIC

TRANSITIONS
Transitions

let your reader clearly know that you're finished
with one part of your essay, and you're moving on to another part.
Transitions
happen between paragraphs as well as within them.
This transition signals the end
of the Topic Sentence and the
start of the first example quote.
This transition signals the end
of the first example/quote and
the start of the second.
Initially...
Ultimately...
These two transitions also
work together to show the
beginning to the end of a process.
This transition signals the
start of Body Paragraph #2.
"For example" almost
always works to signal
the start of...an example.
This transition signals
the start of the second
quote/example.
TRANSITIONS CAN SHOW CONTRAST
For example...
Conversely...
These two transitions
also
work together to show that the
examples are the opposite of each
other.
This only works
because the Topic
Sentence sets up the opposites:
"the two contrasting settings"
This transition signals
the start of the last
Body Paragraph.
This transition signals
the start of the second
quote/example.
This transition signals
the start of the final
concluding sentence.
TRANSITIONS CAN SHOW THERE'S MORE
For example...
Additionally...
These two transitions
also
work together to show that there
are multiple examples that prove
the Topic Sentence.
of an essay
Intro +
Conclusion

INTRODUCTION
PARAGRAPH
BODY
PARAGRAPH #1
BODY PARAGRAPH #2
BODY
PARAGRAPH #3
CONCLUSION
PARAGRAPH
WORKS CITED
PAGE
OVERVIEW
Here's the infamous Five Paragraph Essay:
Introduction
3 Body Paragraphs
Conclusion
Introduces your topic
Sets up your opinion
Describes your plan to prove it
Proves Reason #1 of your opinion
using quotes and commentary
Proves Reason #2 of your opinion
using quotes and commentary
Proves Reason #3 using quotes and commentary
Reviews what you proved
Explains why that matters in real life
Wraps it up with a big clincher
Lists your sources
Gives credit where credit is due
Protects you from plagiarizing
HOOK
Grabs
your reader's attention
Connects
to your topic somehow
Effective hooks
can be:

-
a very
short story
(anecdote)
- a startling
fact or statistic
(must be cited)
- a
quote
from an expert (must be cited)
- a
connection
to life in general
- not a
question
(almost never)
This hook
makes a connection
between the story and life in general
(i.e. life is like the grinch...)
TRANSITION
The intro paragraph transition
is longer than
other transitions in your essay, but it's the
same idea: you're signaling that the hook is
finished, and you're transitioning to giving
your thesis statement.
(1-4 sentences)
(2-4 sentences)
The intro paragraph

transition
sets up the
thesis statement. One way to do this is to
make sure that your transition brings up
all the ideas of your thesis statement before
you get to it.
This thesis statement includes three big ideas:

the story of the Grinch by Dr. Seuss

elements of fiction

redemption of the human spirit
Follow the colored lines to see
how the transition brings up each
of these big ideas before the thesis.
THESIS STATEMENT
(1 and only 1 sentence)
Last sentence
of the intro paragraph
This is
where you
get to the point
of it all
This is
exactly what your essay must
prove
For more info,
check out the
Thesis Statement
thread of this prezi.
INTRO + CONCLUSION
PARAGRAPHS
Beginnings and endings

are often the most difficult
to write, so consider writing these paragraphs
after
you've written the Body Paragraphs.
The intro and conclusion

are
similar
to each other; they're
like the matching bookends of your essay:
INTRO
hooks your reader's attention
sets up what you'll write about
states your thesis
CONCLUSION
restates your thesis
explains why your opinion matters to real life
ends with clincher / reconnects to hook
RESTATE THESIS
(1 and only 1 sentence)
First sentence
of the conclusion paragraph (usually - there's some flexibility here)
Write it
in slightly
different wording
Include
the
Topic,

Opinion
and all the Reasons of the
Plan.
IMPLICATIONS

(2-4 sentences)
During the course of your essay, you've proven
that your Thesis Statement is correct. Now you
need to
explain why it matters to real life.

Answer:
SO WHAT? WHY SHOULD I CARE?
Answer:
WHY SHOULD YOUR READER CARE?
Answer:
How does it connect to life in general?
CLINCHER /
RECONNECT TO HOOK
The last sentence of your essay needs to leave your reader with something to think about. Two ways to do this are to:
1.

state
your final opinion (evaluation) of the
topic (based on the evidence you presented)
2.

reconnect
to your hook (from the intro)

-
finish the
very short story

-
put the
quote, fact
or
statistic
into a
new perspective

-
make a
similar connection
to life in general

-
this method has a nice
"full circle"
effect
This makes a similar connection
to a life in general (just like the
hook did in the first sentence).
The essay points out that goodness and generosity
matter in real life.
We should care
because this resembles our own lives, and it ought to inspire us.
(a.k.a. Rationale)
(a.k.a. Rationale)
(a.k.a. Rationale)
(a.k.a. Rationale)
(a.k.a. Position)
(a.k.a. Position)
(a.k.a. Position)
(a.k.a. Position)
(a.k.a. Position)
Full transcript