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WORLDVIEWS IN RESEARCH

may 2012 event
by

nancy keranen

on 14 October 2013

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Transcript of WORLDVIEWS IN RESEARCH

WORLDVIEWS
IN
RESEARCH

Ontologies
Epistemologies
Axiologies
Methodologies
Rhetorics
Post-Positivism
Constructivism
Advocacy / Participatory
Pragmatism
a personally held “view” that creates a mental model of the world
which helps you interpret / make sense of what you experience
In research, a worldview provides a foundation for your inquiry.
You need to be aware of your worldview in order to
design, carry out, and interpret your research.
Keep in mind that these are always evolving and there are no fixed standards, but they can be classified into primarily four worldviews:
Ontology
(what is the nature of reality?)
Epistemology
(what is the nature of knowledge?)
Axiology (what is the role of values?)
Methodology
(what is the process of research?)
Rhetoric (What kind of language/discourse is used)
Post-postitivsm:

SINGULAR REALITY
(researchers reject or confirm a hypothesis)
Constructivisim:

MULTIPLE REALITIES
(researchers present participants’ different interpretations)
Advocacy / Participatory:
POLITICAL REALITY
(Data, method, and findings
are negotiated with participants)
Pragmatism:
SINGULAR & MULTIPLE REALITIES
(researchers test hypotheses and
provide multiple perspectives)
Post-postitivism:
DISTANCE AND IMPARTIALITY
(researchers “objectively” collect data using a variety of instruments)
Constructivism:
CLOSENESS

(researchers visit participants in their enviroments to collect data)
Advocacy / participatory:
COLLABORATION

(researchers actively involve participants as collaborators in the research process)
Pragmatism:
PRACTICALITY
(researchers collect data by “what works” to address research question)
Post-positivism
:
UNBIASED
(researchers refer to concepts such as reliability and validity as related to instruments and results)
Constructivism:
BIASED
(researchers reveal their biases, interpretations and assumptions)
Advocacy / participatory:
BIASED AND NEGOTIATED
(reseachers negotiate with participants about their interpretations)
Pragmatism:
MULTIPLE STANCES
(researchers include both biased and unbiased perspectives)
Post-positivism:
DEDUCTIVE
(researchers test an a priori theory)
Constructivism:
INDUCTIVE

(researchers start with participants views and build up to patterns, theories and generalizations)
Advocacy/participatory:
PARTICIPATORY
(researchers involve participants in all stages of the research and engage in cyclical reviews of the results)
Pragmatism:
COMBINING
(Researchers collect both quantitative and qualitative data and mix them as needed)
Post-Postivism:
FORMAL STYLE
(researchers use agreed-on definitions of variables)
Constructivism:
INFORMAL STYLE
(
researchers write in a literary, informal style)
Advocacy / participatory:
ADVOCACY AND CHANGE
(researchers use language that will help bring about change or advocate for participants, e.g., emotional appeals)
Pragmatism:

FORMAL OR INFORMAL
(researchers may employ both formal and informal styles of writing)
Context
Past Experience
Distance
Perspectve
causes
probably
determine effects
experimental
reductionistic - discrete testable sets
i.e. variables
theory driven - tested, supported or refuted
standards of validity & reliability
more quantitative than qualitative
as individuals seek to understand their worlds they construct subjective meanings for their experiences.
complexity of views rather than narrowing views to a few categories or ideas
constructed through interaction, culture, history, social negotiation
bias is acknowledged
theory development
focus on marginalization and power structures
action agenda for reform to help change lives, institutions
collaborative

theoretical and philosophical stances, e.g feminist, racial, critical, queer, disability perspectives
the problem drives the research rather than the method(s)
applications and solutions (what works)
not committed to one philosophical stance
choices are based on needs (researcher and researched)
'truth' is relative
contextualized
(mixed-methods research)
Full transcript