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Some Techniques of Cooperative Learning

EDU/311
by

Melodye Holloway

on 3 October 2013

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Transcript of Some Techniques of Cooperative Learning

Cooperative Learning
Techniques

What is Cooperative Learning?
Cooperative learning is a method of instruction that has students working together in groups, usually with the goal of completing a specific task like essays or presentations. This method can help students develop leadership and social skills and the ability to work with others as a team.
Cooperative Learning Demo
The next video explains the basics of cooperative learning and how a teacher is to give instruction for a cooperative learning lesson.
Three Cooperative Learning Techniques
Jig Saw
Round Robin
The teacher presents a category such as "types of trees" to groups for discussion. In the group, the students each take turns writing down one amphibian on the list. Each group can have the same topic or be given a different one such as "name a product made from wood".
Challenges for Round Robin
Advanced students tend to act superior in a group while aggressive students try to take over a group
lack of participation by some group members
lack of knowledge or content by students on a lower academic level
Benefits of Round Robin
Frances Melodye Holloway
EDU/311
September 30, 2013
Nicholas Blake
Techniques
The next video explains the basics of cooperative learning and how a teacher is to give instruction for a cooperative learning lesson.
Collaborative Group Work

Round Robin
The teacher presents a category such as "names of reptiles" to the groups for discussion. In the group, the students will each take turns writing down a reptile on the list. Each group can have the same topic or be given a different one such as "names of fowl".
Example of Round Robin
Collaborative Group Work
Students are to complete independent assignments, however, they are allowed to discuss with others in their group to receive and give assistance, peer advise, tutoring and editing.
Benefits
students are able to teach others and explain things in their own words
students are allowed to interact as needed in order to complete assignment, this provides students with freedom in the classroom
the quality of work tends to be higher when students collaborate with others
Challenges
Students may use this time to socialize and not complete their assignment
noise levels may get out of control, discussing them first may be needed
collaborative work is particularly beneficial for advanced cooperative learning skills
Assign each student in a team one fourth of a page to read from any text (for example, a science text), or one fourth of a topic to investigate or memorize. Each student completes his or her assignment and then teaches the others or helps to put together a team product by contributing a piece of the puzzle.
Benefits
provides students with an effective way to present content
allows students to become familiar with particular information and to teach others
with larges class sizes, this can be a more efficient than individual/group presentations
Challenges
reading material may be too difficult for some students who are at a lower reading level
if a student does not like another he/she may not listen to what that student is sharing with the group causing them to miss out on information
teacher may have difficulty observing each presentation of content to the rest of the group
students are able to teach others and explain things in their own words
students are allowed to interact as needed in order to complete assignment, this provides students with freedom in the classroom
the quality of work tends to be higher when students collaborate with others
Collaborative Group Work
Round Robin
Benefits of the Round Robin Technique
allows equal responsibility for the discussion/assignment
allows students to engage in social interaction and improve problem solving/team work skills
allows students to share knowledge with others
Round Robin
Challenges of the Round
Robin Technique
reading material may be too difficult for some students who are at a lower reading level
if a student does not like another he/she may not listen to what that student is sharing with the group causing them to miss out on information
teacher may have difficulty observing each presentation of content to the rest of the group
Jig Saw
Differentiated Instruction
Collaborative Group Work
If reading is required, provide students with texts appropriate for students at each reading level. Another way to differentiate instruction would be to allow students to choose their topics.
Round Robin
Jig Saw
If reading is required, provide students with texts appropriate for students at each reading level. Another way to differentiate instruction would be to allow students to choose their topics.
If groups are divided more so by academic level, allow students at a lower level access to a variety of materials such as computers and the internet, and the library including text books, encyclopedias or other books pertaining to the topic.
Creating a diverse group of learners can be beneficial to the students as they can learn from each other.

Things to keep in mind when building a group may include:
personal characteristics
interest and goals
influence
opportunity for interaction
Important Components to
Group Building:
have/suggest group members make eye contact when speaking with one another
when possible, the teacher should constantly be walking around the room to monitor activity
the teacher should be aware of each groups discussion and add input when discussion points are incorrect
after group discussion, the teacher should ask probing questions such as "Joe, what was Timmy's ideas on mammals?"
encourage or steer group discussion if the team has a road block
keep students active in the group by encouraging everyone in the group to participate allowing teams to assign jobs etc.
Ways to Govern Groups:
Burden, P. R., & Byrd, D. M. (2013). Methods for effective teaching: Meeting the needs of all students (6th ed.). Retrieved from University of Phoenix EBook Collection database
The teacher presents a category such as "names of reptiles" to groups for discussion. In the group, the students each take turns writing down one amphibian on the list. Each group can have the same topic or be given a different one such as "names of fowls.
Round Robin
Reference
Full transcript