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Message to Grassroots speech analysis

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by

Jorge Rodriguez

on 12 February 2011

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Transcript of Message to Grassroots speech analysis

Malcolm X
Message to Grassroots "How can you justify being nonviolent in Mississippi and Alabama, when your churches are being bombed, and your little girls are being murdered, and at the same time you’re going to violent with Hitler, and Tojo, and somebody else that you don’t even know?" "If violence is wrong in America, violence is wrong abroad. If it’s wrong to be violent defending black women and black children and black babies and black men, then it’s wrong for America to draft us and make us violent abroad in defense of her." "Revolution is based on land. Land is the basis of all independence. Land is the basis of freedom, justice, and equality." "To understand this, you have to go back to what [the] young brother here referred to as the house Negro and the field Negro —— back during slavery." "If the master’s house caught on fire, the house Negro would fight harder to put the blaze out than the master would. If the master got sick, the house Negro would say, "What’s the matter, boss, we sick?" We sick! He identified himself with his master more than his master identified with himself." "Just as the slavemaster of that day used Tom, the house Negro, to keep the field Negroes in check, the same old slavemaster today has Negroes who are nothing but modern Uncle Toms, 20th century Uncle Toms, to keep you and me in check, keep us under control, keep us passive and peaceful and nonviolent." "This is the way it is with the white man in America. He’s a wolf and you’re sheep." "Wilkins attacked King, accused King and the CORE [Congress Of Racial Equality] of starting trouble everywhere and then making the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] get them out of jail and spend a lot of money; and then they accused King and CORE of raising all the money and not paying it back. This happened; I’ve got it in documented evidence in the newspaper." "We’re going to march on Washington, march on the Senate, march on the White House, march on the Congress, and tie it up, bring it to a halt; don’t let the government proceed. They even said they was [sic] going out to the airport and lay down on the runway and don’t let no airplanes land. I’m telling you what they said. That was revolution. That was revolution. That was the black revolution." "It’s just like when you’ve got some coffee that’s too black, which means it’s too strong. What you do? You integrate it with cream; you make it weak. If you pour too much cream in, you won’t even know you ever had coffee. It used to be hot, it becomes cool. It used to be strong, it becomes weak. It used to wake you up, now it’ll put you to sleep. This is what they did with the march on Washington." It was October 10, 1963 when the legendary civil rights leader Malcolm X gave his speech titled "Message to Grassroots". In it, he criticized some well-known leaders of the movement, stating that the march on washington was "infiltrated". One thing that you have to know about Malcolm X is that his goals differed from Martin Luther King Jr. and the other civil rights crusaders. Martin Luther King wanted intergration, Malcolm was fighting for separation. Martin Luther King wanted to obtain rights peacefully, Malcolm wanted independence by any means neccesary. Pathos Imagery Logos Irony Ethos Allusion Metaphor Compare/Contrast Evidence/Data Analogy Analysis by Jorge Rodriguez Appeals
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