Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Timeline

No description
by

Deborah Lorelei

on 22 November 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Timeline

Art of Protest in Civil Rights Movement(1960's) & Black Arts Movement(1960's - 1976):
- Spoken Word/Poetry
- Music/Anthems
- Photojournalism

Amiri Baraka
Last Poets
- Made up by 3 performer - opened up to more
- Poetry as storytelling later applied in music
- Re-using & sampling Artist's works
Anthems
Freedom Songs
Otherwise known as Civil Rights Anthems. Songs sung collectively at rallies, speeches, and protests
Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me 'Round
Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing
I Love Everybody
We Shall Overcome

Empowerment Through Expression: The Creative Approach to Movement
- "father of the Black Arts Movement"
- music as a collective history
- The music was their history.
- Music was a safe space


Sampling
Throughout history, Anthems have been one of the most effective ways to unite a group of people and make collective claims on authority.
Power of Numbers
Orators would use Anthems and "Call and Response" in order to rally the crowd and allow followers to take part in an interactive speech
We Shall Overcome
Photo-Journalism
- Chronicles the Civil Rights and Black Arts Movements

Said to be the "theme song" of the Civil Rights Movement
Renowned gospel-derived melody
Made claims against:
Segregation
Civil and Voting Rights
Racial Inequality
Influential Photographers
Significance
- Bill Hudson
- Bob Adelman
- Bruce Davidson
- Charles Moore
- Dan Budnik
Walter Gadsen
Martin Luther King Jr.
Poetry in the Civil Rights Movement
- Recorded history
- Inspired activists to fight on
- Gave voice to fears for movement
- Langston Hughes
- Margaret Block
- Maya Angelou
Black Arts Movement
- Important to today's art culture
- Brings Social Movements to the Living Rooms of the Masses
- Adopts Claims of Those They Follow
- Provides a Voice for Organizations
- Propagates Familiar Faces and Propels their Influence
-Chronicles the struggle of the times
-Social Movement in itself
Adopts Claims
- Amiri Baraka
- Highly criticized
Implications
- Key to the Success of numerous campaigns
- Exposed Atrocities
- Creates Historical Records
Emmet
Laura
Nate
Sarah

Purpose
Unified followers
Made claims
Expressed sorrow
Uplifted Movement Supporters
Created a voice
Inspired collective movement
Civil Rights Music
- In popular music
today:
Nas - Project Roach
Martin Luther King:
"One could not help but be moved
beyond traditional church songs, which
brought to mind the long history of
the Negro's sufferring."

Full transcript