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Grade 5 Social Studies Unit Plan

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by

Michelle Impey

on 15 November 2015

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Transcript of Grade 5 Social Studies Unit Plan

Big Ideas
1. Interactions between people have consequences that can be positive for some people and negative for others

2. When studying interrelationships between groups of people, it is important to be aware that each group has its own perspective on those interrelationships.
Prior Knowledge: Grade 3
-Time period after 1780 on the affects of the European settlements the different aspects of Aboriginal life
-Proper use of maps: practice interpreting and labelling map of Canada
Overall Expectations
A1. Application: Analyse some key short- and long-term consequences of interactions among and between First Nations and European explorers and settlers in New France prior to 1713
A3. Understanding Context: Describe significant features and interactions of and interactions between some of the main communities in Canada prior to 1713, with a particular focus on First Nations and New France
Lesson One: Introducing New France
Specific Expectation:

A3.6: Describe some significant differences among First Nations and between selected First Nations and European settlements in early Canada, and identify some of the reasons for these differences.

Minds On:
“The French Explorers - Samuel de Champlain” (3:30-5:00)
Grade 5: Heritage and Identity - First Nations and Europeans in New France and Early Canada
Framing Questions
1. Why might the same event have a different impact on different people
2. What causes conflict?
3. Do all conflicts have a resolution?
4. Why is it important to cooperate with others?
5. How are treaties defined by the involved parties geographical locations?
Jonilyn Johnson, Jackie Genge, Michelle Impey
Concepts of Disciplinary Thinking
Cause and Consequence - determining the factors that affect or lead to an issue or event
Continuinity and Change - determine what has stayed the same or changed over a period of time
Significance - determine the importance of issues and events
Interrelationships - explore connections between natural and human systems and how they impact one another
Hands On:
A mapping activity where students will make an estimation of the territory New France covers on a map of North America
Why did you separate the map this way?


Consolidation:
Brief detailing about what territory of North America was part of New France by showing the accurate location on a map.
Lesson Two: Interaction Between First Nations and European Explorers
Specific Expectations:

A3.3 Describe the main motives for Europeans' exploration in early Canada and for the establishment of permanent settlements.
A3.5 Describe significant aspects of the interactions between First Nations and European explorers and settlers during this period.
A3.6 Descirbe some significant differences among First Nations and betwene selected First Nations and European settlements in early Canada
Minds On:
Whole class discussion and venn diagram creation.

Hands On:
Role-play activity. Students will be divided into groups of First Nations (Algonquin, Iroquois) and European explorers with reference to trade, beliefs, knowledge, skills, technology, conflicts, etc.

Consolidation:
Exit ticket involving the sharing of one point students have learned from each of the groups they were not a part of, as well as three points from their own group discussion.
Lesson Three: How First Nations and Europeans Impacted One Another
Specific Expectations:

A1.1 Describe some of the positive and negative consequences of contact between First Nations and Europeans in New France.
A1.2 Analyse aspects of early contact between First Nations and Europeans in New France to determine the ways in which different parties benefited.
Minds On:
Review exit ticket responses and how they connect to the positive and negative consequences of contact.

Hands On:
In groups of 5, students will do research on: diseases, fur trade, knowledge of land, medicine, weapons and technologies and competition for resources in relation to the interactions between First Nations and European explorers. Research will be represented in T-chart form by each group member.

Consolidation:
The class will break off into groups of 6 for a jigsaw ativity to discuss their T-charts.
Lesson Four: Current Issues
Specific Expectation:
A1.3 Explain some of the ways in which interactions between and among First Nations and Europeans in New France are connected to issues in present day Canada.
Minds On:
Students will participate in the creation of their own newspaper headlines.

Hands On:
Teacher will provide articles relating to current issues affecting Aboriginal people in Canada OR students can do research from online news or print articles relating to: inadequate healthcare, unsafe drinking water, poor education system, inadequate housing, abuse of land rights for the students to analyse.

Consolidation:
"Ask It" basket: write two to three questions on a piece of paper about any misunderstanding that the students currently have about the material that has been covered in this unit to date.
Lesson Five: Dear Diary, The First Contact
Specific Expectations:

A1.1 Describe some of the positive and negative consequences of contact between First Nations and Europeans in New France.
A1.2 Analyse aspects of early contact between First Nations and Europeans in New France to determine the ways in which different parties benefited.
Minds On:
Snowball activity. Student's will think of answers to one of two questions: How will this new technology influence my daily routine? OR How can these new materials/resources influence life in Europe?

Hands On:
Students will write a journal entry from the perspective of a First Nation person coming into contact with the European settlers as well as from the perspective of a European settler during the first contact with a First Nations community.

Consolidation:
Group share of a portion of their journal entry.
Lesson Six: Culminating Task
Specific Expectation:

A1.3 Explain some of the ways in which interactions between and among First Nations and Europeans in New France are connected to issues in present day Canada.
A3.5 Describe significant aspects of the interactions between First Nations and European explorers and settlements during this period.
Minds On:
Time for a "Quick Six" activity. Fold a piece of paper into six sections and write down your answers to pre-selected questions/categories.

Hands On:
Split the class in half (A and B), and then split those groups into two groups (A1 and A2, B1 and B2) for the debate. Two of the groups (A1 and B1) will represent the First Nations and the other two groups (A2 and B2) will represent the European settlers. Arguments should present claims about resources, land, treaties, etc.

Consolidation:
Debate wrap up. Whole class discussion about strongest points and weakest points.
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