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CSQT

A method or formula for answering questions that helps you remember key information needed for an excellent response.
by

Amy Rosato

on 11 December 2014

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Transcript of CSQT

CSQT
The
claim
is the answer to the question. Often you can use part of the question to formulate your claim.
C-
Claim
Your
claim
is what you will try to prove through your answer. In a one paragraph answer, the
claim
is your topic sentence. In a longer essay, the
claim
is your thesis sentence. A thesis is what you intend to prove through your essay.
Making a
Claim
Set-up
– Introduce the quote to be used.
S-
Set up the quote
The
set-up
simply provides a transition from your claim to your quote. It often IS NOT a complete sentence, but rather a transitional phrase.
Making a
set-up
The
quote
is the textual reference that supports your claim.
Q-
Quote
Choose a
quote
that supports your claim.
Be sure your readers can tell who wrote the quote.
Include the author’s name in your set-up sentence: According to Smith, “
Quote
.” OR
Include the author’s name in parenthesis after the
quote
. For example: “
Quote
,” (Smith).
Making a
quote
Explain how the Quote proves your Claim. Often the
tie-in
is two or more sentences. First explain the
quote
and then it’s connection to the
Claim
T-
Tie-In
The
tie-in
is the most important part of your answer. It provides your reader with the explanation for your
claim
.
Be sure that the
quote
you pick actually supports your answer
EXPLAIN the meaning of the
quote
(you may have to explain how it fits in the story, etc., or other info to help the reader)
Finally, explicitly explain how the
quote
fits the
claim!
Making a
tie-in
Example of CSQT:
What type of conflicts are present in the story “Dark They Were and Golden-Eyed” ?

Answer:
One type of conflict present in the story is character versus society.
On page 453 it states

“‘You’ve got to work with me. If we stay here, we’ll all change. The air. Don’t you smell it? Something in the air. A Martian virus, maybe; some seed, or a pollen. Listen to me!” They stared at him.” (Bradbury 453).
This quote shows a character versus society conflict because Mr. Bittering is begging the people to help him build a rocket, yet they are ignoring him. He is alone in his concerns and it is him against the whole town.

Is a method/formula for answering questions that helps you remember key information needed for an excellent response.
Full transcript