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Facilitating PLCs 4-day Institute Summer 13

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Donna Braun

on 6 October 2014

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Transcript of Facilitating PLCs 4-day Institute Summer 13

Facilitating Professional Learning Communities Institute
Essential Question: What is a professional learning community and how does it contribute to student achievement?
Day 1
Pick a post card that connects to your experience as an educator.

Be prepared to introduce yourself in one sentence by saying your name and why you picked this card.
Opening - Postcards
Facilitators
Chris Cuthbertson and Donna Braun

Why am I here? and what do I want to learn?
World Cafe
What would it look like, feel like, sound like in your school if everyone considered him or herself a learner?
What would it look like, feel like, sound like in your school if everyone felt that their expertise was valued as much as anyone else’s?
What would it look like, sound like, feel like if everyone felt that working together we can do better than the best one of us alone on her or his best day?
How did the experience work for you as a learner? What was challenging?

How would you use the experience as a leader and facilitator?

Take Away Notes
Debrief:
dance floor to balcony
Comfort, Risk, and Danger Zones
Zones of Safety and Learning
First protocol experience
Microlab
Why did you decide to become an educator? What drew you to this profession?
Why do you stay? What keeps you coming back, year after year?
In terms of our practice, what is the one thing you won't compromise? What will you go to the wall for?
As a learner....

As a facilitator and leader....
Debrief
Building Professional Community in Schools
(Kruse, Seashore Louis, & Bryk)
Three Levels of Text Protocol
As a learner.....

As a leader and facilitator...
Debrief
An Exercise in Understanding Preferences in Group Work
North, South, East and West: Compass Points
Seeing before Meaning
The Power of Observation before Inference
Why try to stay at the bottom rung for longer?
The ladder of inference - Peter Senge
If you move up the ladder, we will ask, "what is your evidence of that?" to help you move back down.
Observation Practice
Apply Observation to Student Work
A focus on assets.
Collaborative Assessment Conference
Home Learning:
Read Shifting Focus from Deficits to Assets
Read SRI Resource and Protocol Book:
Guide for Pre-Conference (pg. 92)
Guide for Using Seven Protocols (86)

Journal Prompt: Reflect on the elements of professional learning communities that you find in your professional practice now. After today, what do you see as the roles of dialogue, reflection, and protocols in building your learning community?
Closing Day 1
Poem: "Lost," by David Wagoner from Collected Poems 1956-1976
Reflection and Inspiration
Lost

Stand still. The trees ahead and bushes beside you
Are not lost. Wherever you are is called Here,
And you must treat it as a powerful stranger,
Must ask permission to know it and be known.
The forest breathes. Listen. It answers,
I have made this place around you.
If you leave it, you may come back again, saying Here.
No two trees are the same to Raven.
No two branches are the same to Wren.
If what a tree or a bush does is lost on you,
You are surely lost. Stand still. The forest knows
Where you are. You must let it find you
Essential Questions: How might the work of professional learning communities empower educators to take ownership of their own professional development? What is the role of dialogue, inquiry, and reflection in building your learning community?
Day 2
What will have happened today if you look back upon it and say you were comfortable all day? What will have happened today if, upon reflection, you find yourself saying you took risks, operated in your risk zone today? What must you do to ensure the latter? How can this group help? Who do you know back home who is waiting for you to take this risk?
Morning Journal
Reflecting back on reflections
Movie titles
Getting to know our community in different ways
Connections

Norms

Three-levels text protocol: Shifting Focus: From Deficits to Assets (Baron)

Pre-conferencing

Tuning Protocol
Home Groups this morning
Walk about with a partner for about 10 minutes; tell your story of a time you had a 'nightmare' of getting or giving feedback. Listen to your partner’s story, and then together tease out the characteristics of effective feedback.
Walkabout
Effective Feedback

Atlas Looking at Data Protocol

Pre-Conferencing in Pairs

Protocols in small groups
Afternoon in Home Groups
Home Learning
Read Willing to Be Disturbed
Draft ideas of how to bring this work back to your learning community
Journal: How will I raise issues of equity and achievement in my learning community? How do you want professional learning communities to influence the culture of your school?
Closing Day 2
http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/derek_sivers_how_to_start_a_movement.html
Inspiration and Reflections
Essential Questions: What are the structural and cultural conditions that insure equity as we learn to adapt our practice to enhance the learning of all students? What actions will you take and what supports do you need to use what you've learned here in your professional learning communities?
Day 3
Opening Moves
Journal: How can changing what you do change what happens around you? How can learning communities help?

Connections

Reflections

Agenda
Home Groups in the Morning
Realms of Influence and Concern
Being Pro-Active about Dilemmas in Bringing the Work Back
Write all your
Concerns
in bringing the work back.

Group process how to move concerns to
Influence
.
Moving from Concern to Influence
Home Learning
Read:
Collegiality as a Professional Virtue (Sergiovanni)
What's So Special About Protocols (Allen & Blythe)
SRI Resource and Protocol Book Pocket Guide to Probing Questions (pgs 89-91).

Bring this work back to your school and practice your facilitation!
Prepare to share a success in bringing this work back
Prepare to share a dilemma in bringing this work back by using the questions on pg 41 of the SRI book to prepare of focus question for feedback.

Journal: What is the connection between a powerful learning community and raising achievement for all students?
Closing

Working Together
a poem by David Whyte

“We shape our self to fit this world

and by the world are shaped again.

The visible and the invisible working together

in common cause, to produce the miraculous.

I am thinking of the way the intangible air

passed at speed round a shaped wing easily holds our weight.

So may we, in this life trust to those elements

we have yet to see or imagine,

and look for the true shape of our own self

by forming it well to the great intangibles about us.”
Inspiration and Reflections
Individual Guided Writing,
then move to group planning and feedback
Bringing the Work Back
What do you know about the people with whom you will be working in your learning community - your relationships with them, their relationships with each another?





How do you imagine this learning community will serve you, its other members, your students, and the larger school community?
What difficulties might you face in bring this work back to my school and learning community? How will you turn those around?




Where’s the support for this work?
Imagine a particularly productive learning community meeting: What are you doing? What kinds of interactions, sharing of work, and reflective dialogue are occurring?
What does your learning community need to get to this vision from where they are now?




What do you believe are the most important things you need to do as a facilitator to help them grow toward a highly effective learning community?
Work with your school team to put your plan on chart paper.

Illustrate your plan for bringing this work back to your learning community.

Focus on describing your goals for the year and/or to accomplish by the time we meet again.

Describe what will the first few meetings will look like.
Articulate Your Plan
Post your plan
Walk around the room silently reading other group's plans
Use the olive stickies to give warm feedback
Use the blue stickies to give cool feedback and probing questions
Try to give everyone one of each.
Critical Feedback Gallery Walk
After Gallery Walk: meet with your group, review your feedback, and discuss any additions/changes you may make.
Thinking about how collegiality is defined in the Collegiality as a Professional Virtue text, how have you successfully fostered adult dialogue that has resulted in increased collegiality focused on success for all students?

Now think about the What is so Special about Protocols excerpt, how have the protocols helped you do this? How would it have gone differently if you didn’t use protocols?

Day 4
Extra Resources and Material
School Reform Initiative Website for Protocols:
www.schoolreforminitiative.org/
Center for Leadership and Educational Equity Website to sign up for LLN Critical Friends Groups: http://leadershipandequity.org
Connections, Reflections, Norms, Agenda
Opening
Prepare a success in using protocols/growing your learning community

In triads, do three 6 min. rounds of the following:
Presenter shares success (2 min)
Clarifying questions (1 min)
Group reflects on why successful (presenter is silent, uses chart paper to summarize) (3 min)

At end, each group shares the categories or commonalities of their successes on their chart paper
Success Analysis
Articulate plan for your learning community for rest of year.

Include goal(s), timeline and who will be responsible.

Be ready to share the plan individually with a small group (capture on paper)
Planning for the rest of the year
In Triads
- what is a belief you hold dear about this work and your plan? Where do you see this in your work, where could it be more?
- Share with group for feedback
Gap Analysis
Get back together with whoever you planned with and go over feedback.

Decide on additions/modifications to plan.
Incorporating Feedback
Reflections, Final Evaluation, Postcards, and Hummingbird:
Dirt the Movie - 46:40-48:15
http://www.hulu.com/dirt-the-movie

Closing
At ease, no tension, have a good grip on our environment, know how to navigate occasional rough spots with ease. Also a place to retreat to from the Danger Zone.
The Comfort Zone:
Involves adapting to new circumstances, the most fertile ground for learning, willing to take risks, to not know everything or anything but willing to learn, considering options and ideas. The place of greatest learning
The Risk Zone:
An area full of defenses, fears, red lights, desire for escape. Not a good place to operate because it takes too much energy and time to accomplish anything.
The Danger Zone:
Danger
Risk
Comfort
Zones of Safety Exercise
Facilitator: Chris Cuthbertson
Home Groups

Facilitator: Donna Braun
Looking at Student Work Protocols
The Final Word Text-Based Protocol
Mindset excerpts (Dwek)
"Turning to One Another"- Margaret Wheatley

There is no power greater than a community discovering what it cares about.

Ask: 'What's possible?' not 'What's wrong?' Keep asking.
Notice what you care about. Assume that many others share your dreams.
Be brave enough to start a conversation that matters. Talk to people you know. Talk to people you don't know. Talk to people you never talk to.
Be intrigued by the differences you hear. Expect to be surprised. Treasure curiosity more than certainty.
Invite in everybody who cares to work on what's possible. Acknowledge that everyone is an expert about something. Know that creative solutions come from new connections.
Remember, you don't fear people whose story you know. Real listening always brings people closer together.
Trust that meaningful conversations can change your world.
Rely on human goodness.
Stay together.
Additional Resources
Consultancies
Delivered and facilitated by Center for Leadership and Educational Equity, with support from NYC Leadership Academy.The contents of this paper were developed under a Race to the Top grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.
http://www.globalonenessproject.org/library/films/ubuntu
Val Marchetti
Olivia Smith
Pam Fissette
Karen Lamarre
Allison Calderone
Aimee Amodie
Jeff LaPierre
Wobberson Torchon
Tricia Bowler
Bree Schebel
Caroline Maggiacomo
AnnaMarie Urrutia
Claudia Jackvony
Natalie Jutras
Troy Silvia
Heather Longo
Rashan Gomes
Jennifer Roe
Developing Probing Questions
Context: My class is submitting work that is of a poorer quality than I had hoped and expected. We had spent two weeks learning about and practicing persuasive essays. I gave them the directions for the writing assessment and attached the school-wide writing rubric. Based on the work they submitted, I don’t think that students even looked at the rubric. How can I improve the writing effectiveness of students in my Junior Composition class?
Given examples
Less Probing:
Could you have students use the rubric to assess their own papers?
More Probing:
How can you help students to develop a more critical eye towards their own work?
In what ways does the rubric assist students in improving their work? In what ways might it hold them back?
Courage of Conversation
Text Rendering

"Turning to One Another"- Margaret Wheatley

There is no power greater than a community discovering what it cares about.

Ask: 'What's possible?' not 'What's wrong?' Keep asking.
Notice what you care about. Assume that many others share your dreams.
Be brave enough to start a conversation that matters. Talk to people you know. Talk to people you don't know. Talk to people you never talk to.
Be intrigued by the differences you hear. Expect to be surprised. Treasure curiosity more than certainty.
Invite in everybody who cares to work on what's possible. Acknowledge that everyone is an expert about something. Know that creative solutions come from new connections.
Remember, you don't fear people whose story you know. Real listening always brings people closer together.
Trust that meaningful conversations can change your world.
Rely on human goodness.
Stay together.
CLARIFYING
(for you to give
better feedback)
PROBING
(for the presenter to think deeply to solve own problem)
SUGGESTIONS
(what you would do in the same situation)
1.
Jen M.
Kim C.
Heather L.

2.
Val M.
Kerri W.
Jen R.

3.
Bree S.
Aimee A.
Rahsaan G.

4.
Olivia S.
Jeff L.
Tricia B.+ F.
















5.
Pam F.
Katie G.
Caroline M.

6.
Josh L.
Natalie J.
Stephanie Y.

7.
Anna-Marie U.
Lucille F.
Domenic D.










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