Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

History of Number Systems Scrapbook

No description
by

Brody Harwell

on 14 May 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of History of Number Systems Scrapbook

History of Number Systems Scrapbook
Babylonian Number System
The Babylonian Number System has been around for over 4000 years.
This system was base 60 and used only two symbols: vertical wedge to represent one and a corner wedge to represent ten.
Cuneiform numbers were written using a combination of the two wedges.
There was no symbol for zero, but they did use the concept of zero by leaving a blank space.
Egyptian Number System
The Egyptian Number System was a decimal base system.
The Egyptians used a written numeration that was later changed into hieroglyphic symbols.
There was a special symbol for each power of ten.
The Egyptians did not have an understanding of zero.
Greek Number System
The Greek Number System is all based upon their alphabet.
The Greek alphabet contained 27 different symbols and is a combination of created symbols and borrow symbols.
The 27 symbols were combined together to represent any number up to 1000 and they used a comma after the first row of symbols to create numbers up to 10,000.
The Greek's did not have a concept of zero.
Mayan Number System
The Mayans use a vigesimal system that had a base of 20.
A dot was the symbol that represented numbers one through four and a dash represented five.
Their numbers were written vertically instead of horizontally.
The first five five place values were based on multiples of 20.
The Mayans did have a concept of zero and even created a symbol.
Combination of the vertical and corner wedges
The Babylonian Number System was founded on the clay mathematical tablet called Plimpton 322
Egyptian Hieroglyphic Symbols
The Egyptian Number System has been discovered on this piece of math history called the Rhind papyrus
This is a tablet of the 27 Greek alphabet symbols. They combined these symbols to create numbers up to 10,000.
A Mayan long count calender that provides evidence of the Mayan Number System.
Tablet of the different combinations of the two symbols that the Mayans used and their symbol for zero.
Hindu-Arabic Number System
The Hindu-Arabic Number System is the number system that we use and is widely used across the world.
This system uses ten different digits that can be combined together to represent all numbers.
This system is a base ten decimal system.
This system uses a place value system from right to left.
The Hindu-Arabic System was additive and multiplicative.
References
Hindu-Arabic Numeration System. (2008, January 1). Hindu-Arabic numeration system. Retrieved May 11, 2014, from http://www.basic-mathematics.com/hindu-arabic-numeration-system.html

Holt, L. (n.d.). Egyptian Number System . Number Systems. Retrieved May 11, 2014, from http://www.math.wichita.edu/history/topics/num-sys.html

Mercer, M. (n.d.). Mayan Number System. Number Systems. Retrieved May 11, 2014, from http://www.math.wichita.edu/history/topics/num-sys.html

Sorum, E. (n.d.). Greek Number System. Number Systems. Retrieved May 11, 2014, from http://www.math.wichita.edu/history/topics/num-sys.html

Troutman, J. (n.d.). Babylonian Number System . Number Systems. Retrieved May 11, 2014, from http://www.math.wichita.edu/history/topics/num-sys.html












This is the book
Liber Abaci
written by Fibonacci in 1202. Fibonacci is given credit for bringing the Hindu-Arabic system to the western world.
(Troutman, J. )
(Holt, L. )
(Sorum, E. )
(Mercer, M. )
(Hindu-Arabic Numeration System)
Full transcript