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Making Ink Out Of Teabags

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Cammylle Beltran

on 11 February 2015

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Transcript of Making Ink Out Of Teabags

I. Abstract
This research is being done to find out if tea bags can be used to create ink. Lipton Yellow Label tea bags contain Orange Pekoe Black Tea. Pekoe tea is a fine grade of tea which includes young tea leaves and buds. Also, Camellia Sinensis is a species of plant whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea. Extracts taken from these tea bags have the potential to be made into an ink.
III. Significance of the Study
This investigatory project will benefit us by producing an alternative of other inks. These other manufactured inks presently come quite expensive prices, but since the materials to be used in our project are common and easy to find, you will be spending less money. Also, no harmful chemicals will be used in making our ink. Therefore, it is non-toxic compared to commercially sold inks which have the tendencies of causing harm to one’s health and to the environment.
Procedure
1. Place the 7 teabags in a ½ cup of boiling water.

2. Create the tea for 6-8 minutes.

3. Remove the teabags from the boiling water. Use the strainer and a fork.

4. While stirring the tea, add a tablespoon of vinegar.

5. Continue to stir it. Add as much cornstarch you need to have your desired consistency.

6. Remove it from the heat and let it cool. When done, store it in a bottle.

V. Methodology
4-7 Teabags
VI. Definition of terms
Ink- a liquid or paste that contains pigments or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or design
Tea- an aromatic beverage commonly prepared by pouring hot or boiling water over cured leaves of the Camellia Sinensis, an evergreen shrub native to Asia
Pekoe tea- a fine grade of tea which includes young tea leaves and buds
Camellia Sinensis- a species of plant whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea
Tea bags- a small, porous sealed bag containing tea leaves and used with water for brewing the beverage called tea, or herbs or spices for brewing herbal teas
Vinegar- is a liquid substance consisting mainly of acetic acid and water, the acetic acid being produced through the fermentation of ethanol by acetic acid bacteria
Cornstarch- the starch of the corn (maize) grain obtained from the endosperm of the corn kernel
Boiling- the rapid vaporization of a liquid, which occurs when a liquid is heated to its boiling point, the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid is equal to the pressure exerted on the liquid by the surrounding environmental pressure.
Stirring- move a spoon or other implement around in (a liquid or other substance) in order to mix it thoroughly.
Hibiscus tea- a herbal tea made as an infusion from crimson or deep magenta-colored calyces (sepals) of the roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) flower.

A. Background of the Study
Writing is a way to communicate with others. It is a form of art used to express one’s thought. Writing promotes your ability to ask and also fosters your ability to explain. Students always take down notes from the lectures of their teachers. And in order to do this, one must get a hold of ink and a piece of paper. That is why the researcher wants to find another substitute for industrial inks. Since most of the inks that are for sale today, are a bit expensive, only a few people use this compared to the people who write electronically. This research endeavors to prove that teabags can be a source of colorant for ink and by adding vinegar and cornstarch, the ink produces a more vibrant and long lasting hue. Writing on paper preserves the splendid ideas of the youth in this generation so that it may be reflected in the years to come.
Making Ink Out Of Teabags
Generally, the researcher wants to know if teabags are an effective colorant for making calligraphy ink. Other than that, we want to know if vinegar and cornstarch can strengthen the color of the ink and if flour can contribute to the desired consistency. There are two hypotheses in this study—first, teabags are effective colorant in producing ink and second, by adding cornstarch and vinegar to the mixture, it will produce more vibrant and long-lasting color.
B. Statement of the Problem
Generally, this investigatory project aims to find out if tea bags can be used to create an ink. Specifically, it aims to answer the following questions:
1. Are tea bags extract use as an ink effective?
2. What are the components of the tea bags that can show that it can be an effective alternative ink? 3. What type of tea is to be used for this study?
4. What additives should be used to strengthen the color of the ink?
5. Does it make any difference in adding vinegar to the mixture?

Materials:
1/2 cup of boiling water
1 tablespoon of vinegar
1 teaspoon of cornstarch
Stainer
Vial
Fork
Spoon
II. Introduction
IX. Recommendations
For further investigations, we recommend:
using black tea for a darker outcome of the ink; or
you may leave the tea bags soaked in water overnight
VII. Result and Discussion
Our Investigatory Project has proven our hypothesis that tea can be made into ink. Our ink can be now used by putting it in a cartridge and then put it in a calligraphy pen or quill pen.
Compared to commercialized ink, our ink is much cheaper and economical. We can also use expired tea to make it. Although it’s lighter in color compared to other inks, it is still visible and has better health effects than commercialized inks.

One of the materials used in this project, vinegar, makes the ink more visible because it has acetic acid – an aqueous solution that is important reagent and industrial chemical, mainly used in the production of cellulose acetate. Cellulose acetate is used as film base in photography and a film base is a transparent substance which acts as a support medium for the photosensitive emulsion that lies on the top of it, it accounts the thickness of any given film stock.

The addition of vinegar and cornstarch in making an ink can result into a thicker consistency and consistent color which is better for the usage of ink. Our observations proved that adding vinegar to the mixture can be made because without vinegar, there would be no consistency on the mixture and it will be less seen.

VIII. Conclusion
Teabags extract can be used in making ink
Teabags contain brewed tea leaves to create an extract.
Any type of tea, even expired tea, can be used in order to create ink. However, the color of the ink may vary depending on the type of tea used.
Vinegar can strengthen the color of the product.
Cornstarch effectively contributes to achieving the right consistency of the ink.
The process, boiling and straining are efficient in taking the extract out of the teabags.
The addition of vinegar and cornstarch in making an ink can result into a thicker consistency and consistent color which is better for the usage of ink. Our observations proved that adding vinegar to the mixture can be made because without vinegar, there would be no consistency on the mixture and it will be less seen.

There are many kinds of ink. In our experiment,
we used tea as the main component of our ink. Cornstarch is an efficient additive to have the right consistency of the product. Also, vinegar is efficient, though there is no obvious change in color when the vinegar is added or not, it was seen that it gave the ink a consistent color wether wet or dry. We therefore conclude that one can create an improvised ink using the extract from teabags and tea. This will be very convenient and affordable because the ingredients to be used are commonly found around the house. Also, the said processes, boiling and straining, are efficient and can be easily done.
Comparison
Commercial Ink
Tea Ink
contains hazardous
chemicals
toxic
natural
convenient
expensive
affordable
non-toxic
used
in
writing

X. References
A. Internet
• http://www.studymode.com/essays/Permanent-Ink-From-Tea-Bags-Extracts-1920104.html
• http://www.studymode.com/essays/Ink-Out-Of-Teabags-46026204.html
• http://www.slideshare.net/Geberlyn/ink-made-from-teabags
• http://www.slideshare.net/Charlotte122899/investigatory-project?related=1

IV. Study of the Related Literature
• http://www.studymode.com/essays/Permanent-Ink-From-Tea-Bags-Extracts-1920104.html

This research is being done to find out the potency of the extract of the leaves from the plant Camellis Sinensis as an ink. Nowadays, ink is a pigment in a liquid or paste form used as colorants and dyes. Also, they are becoming more and more expensive because of their increasing purposes. Our research aims to produce this ink as a cheaper alternative compared to commercial ones. As compared to the ink we are aiming to create, commercially produced inks are toxic and hazardous to a person’s health once there is an inappropriate contact with it.

• http://www.studymode.com/essays/Ink-Out-Of-Teabags-46026204.html

The history and usage of ink can be traced back to the 18th century B.C., with the utilization of natural plant dyes, animal and mineral inks based on such materials. Ink is a pigment in a liquid form or paste form used as colorants and dyes. Ink provides much of the color on paper in the modern world and has many uses in different cultures around the globe. Also, they are becoming more and more expensive because of their increasing purposes. Although ink is universally available today, you can make your own ink out of teabags to experience the way people used to do it. .


Submitted By:
LEADER: Nicole Cammylle A.Beltran
Members: Rachel Hannah C. dela Cruz
Jan Danielle C. Fernandez
Alexa Gywn R. Lapitan
Aliya Cassandra L. Llanos
Riana Fraces M. Manalo
Submitted To: Ms. Myleen R. Caguindagan
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