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Copy of figurative language

Goes over figuartive language
by

Michelle Slobodzian

on 28 September 2015

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Transcript of Copy of figurative language

Figurative Language is the use of words or phrases in a manner where the literal meaning of the words is not true or does not make sense, but implies a non-literal meaning which does make sense or that could be true.
Figurative Language
Simile

A simile uses the words “like” or “as”
to compare one object or idea with another different object to suggest they are alike.
Example of Simile language

She has a face like a pitbull.
or
She was as cold as a polar bear with no fur.
or
My love is like a red, red rose.
or
Your noise is like music to my ears.
Metaphor
Comparing two objects that are not alike without using "like" or "as."
Example
My heart's a stereo.
or
You are what you eat.
Personification
Where human characteristics are given to an object.
Examples of Personification
The door hit me.
or
The trees lifted up their branches to the sun.
or
My money jumped out of my wallet.
Alliteration
The repetition of the same initial letter, sound, or group of sounds in a series of words.
Alliteration examples
:

She sells seashells by the seashore.
or

The Blue bug, bit the big black bear, and the big black bear bleed blue black blood
or
Garry’s giraffe gobbled gooseberry’s greedily, getting good at grabbing goodies
Onomatopoeia
The use of a word to describe or imitate a natural sound or the sound
made by an object or an action.
Onomatopoeia Examples:
Pop
snap
crackle
bang
splat
Hyperbole

An exaggeration
This video shows a long alliteration
Hyperbole examples

He has tons of money.

Her brain is the size of a pea.

I have told you a million times.

I was going to die if I had to spend one more night in Ms. Slobodzian's class.
Imagery
The formation of mental images, figures, or likenesses of things to paint a mental picture in your mind.
Symbols
Something used for or regarded as representing something else; a material object representing something, often something immaterial; emblem, token, or sign.
My Mother ate an apple and my Father ate a pear.

My MOTH-er ATE an AP-ple, AND my FATH-er ATE a PEAR.
Meter & Rhyme
Poetic measure; arrangement of words in regularly measured, patterned, or rhythmic lines or verses.
VOICE
Expression in spoken or written words, or by other means.
- It is in your tone (happy, sad, angry, excited)
- It is in the wording you choose
Full transcript