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Newton's Laws of Motion (comic)

Newton's Three Laws of Motion in comic strip form
by

Bernadette Tabith

on 16 December 2013

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Transcript of Newton's Laws of Motion (comic)

photo credit Nasa / Goddard Space Flight Center / Reto Stöckli
Newton's Three Laws of Motion
Newton's First Law
An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force. An object in motion continues in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. Otherwise known as:
inertia
Newton's Second Law
Acceleration is produced when a force acts on a mass. The greater the mass the greater the amount of force needed . It can also be expressed in an equation:
Force = Mass x Acceleration
Newton's Third Law
For every action there is an equal and opposite re-action.
Leo doesn't like Seymour so he tries to push him away. But Leo isn't applying an unbalanced force to overcome inertia. In frame three Leo finally reaches equilibrium and applies more force, finally successfully pushing Seymour away from him. And Seymour will continue at a constant velocity.
After being pushed by Leo, Seymour crashes into a penguin named Gerald. Since Gerald has less mass than Seymour and Seymour is applying a great force on Gerald, Gerald goes flying into a nearby tree. Seymour, seeing the dilemma, promptly turns around and whistles away.
Gerald's collision with the tree causes an unbalanced force from the tree. So, the tree is pushing back on Gerald with a stronger force in the opposite direction. Again, the great force from the tree and the small mass of Gerald allows Gerald to accelerate at a faster rate into the sky. Finally coming to splat on a fence.
THE END
Presented by,
Krystin Gates
Full transcript