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The Web of Outcasts

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by

Christopher Le

on 30 June 2014

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Transcript of The Web of Outcasts

The Web of Outcasts
Presented by Christopher Le
1984
Brave New World
"The Pedestrian"
Brave New World
"The Company Man"
1984
"The Company Man"
"The Pedestrian"
This project is based on a spider and its spider web because spiders are solitary creatures. Likewise, the outcasts in these pieces of literature are alone either mentally or physically. Each piece of literature on this web has its own outcast, and each outcast is on a single strand of the whole web. Since strands are connected in a web, every outcast is thematically related to another outcast.
The outcast in
1984
is Winston Smith because he refuses to lose his individuality like the other citizens in his society. While everyone else falls to the Party, Winston defiantly tries to rebel against the Party's oppression. After secretly rebelling for months, Winston believes that the Party has no idea about his actions. However, Winston gets caught easily and endures months of brainwashing and torture. Mentally crushed, Winston is released back into society where he is no longer an outcast.



John is the main outcast because he is not accepted everywhere he goes. When he grows up in the Reservation, John's skin marks him as an outsider, preventing him from participating in the tribe's rituals. John travels to the World State where he hopes to belong. Unfortnately, he remains an outcast in this society because the sexual culture clashes with John's traditional values he learned from Shakespeare and from the Reservation.

The outcast in this short story is Phil, the workaholic. He is an outcast with his family because he does not have strong relationships with his family members. His children barely know him, and his wife is bitter that Phil never acted like a true dad in the family. The author of this work uses satire to criticize Phil's unemotional behavior towards his family.
"A company friend said, 'I know how much you will miss him.' And she answered, 'I already have.'

"His 'dearly beloved' eldest... went around the neighborhood researching his father."

"His second child was a girl, but whenever she was alone with her father, in a car driving somewhere, they had nothing to say to each other."

"So when he finally worked himself to death... no one was really suprised."


The outcast is Leonard Mead in his community because he is the only one that is not obsessed with television. He is the only person who loves literature walks at night to enjoy nature. Because of Leonard's different lifestyle, he is a pariah.


Outcasts in the extreme minority will be seen as suspicious and criminal.

An outcast may be an outsider because his moral beliefs may clash with his community's lifestyle.


The major theme that
Brave New World
and "The Company Man" share is the loss of emotional relationships in society. These two pieces of literature have societies that lose the true feelings of emotions in their relationships. The citizens in
Brave New World
have little emotion invested with others. In the society, family and other relationships are taboo. As a result, if someone dies, people do not have sorrow because they have no emotion attached to the person. Interestingly, the family in "The Company Man" experiences the same feelings of no emotion when the father dies as the
Brave New World
citizens . The main difference is that the denizens of the World State are conditioned to feel a lack of emotion because of their culture. In contrast, the family wishes they could feel emotion when the dad dies because family relationships are important in the society. In a way, the outcasts in these stories juxtapose each other. John is a pariah because he wants to experience emotion in his life. On the other hand, the father is an outcast because he did not try to form emotional relationships with his family. John and Phil are similar by that they both are really dedicated in what they do, which causes them to be outcasts. Phil is extremely dedicated to his job, which alienates him from his family. John is dedicated to his moral beliefs, which alienages him from the sexual culture in the World State.

In utopian societies, there will always be an outcast who thinks differently and wants to change the community.

Science has the power to control human's emotions and freedoms.



People value relationships less when they have other priorities.

After years of not showing affectionate behavior, people will lose respect and love.
VS
A similar theme that
Brave New World
and
1984
share is that advancements in technology can lead to the destruction of human individuality. The Party in
1984
uses advanced technology to watch every citizen's actions. If people ever try to express their freedoms, the Party marks them and will torture and brainwash them until they love the Party and Big Brother. Winston, the outcast, tries to defy his society and its technology, but the technology catches him and he is forced to love the Party. Technology in
Brave New World
essentially controls every aspect of the citizens. Soma, a new drug, controls people's emotions. With technology, people are designated a caste before they are born. These advancements severely hinder people's freedoms because they have no social mobility. The outcast in
Brave New World
, John, witnesses how the technology destroys people's individuality and chooses to leave. John and Winston are similar because they both want to feel true emotion. The Party tries to subdue its people's emotions to prevent rebellions and because it gives the Party power. Winston wants to feel emotion to rebel againt the Party and to feel like a real human again. John wants true emotion because of his love of Shakespeare. Shakespeare's works are full of emotion, so John cannot visualize a world without feelings.
Any activity not mainstream is considered suspicious and criminal is the theme that occurs in
1984
and "The Pedestrian." In
1984
, Winston's society lost most of its individuality and emotion. As a result, any action that shows identity and feelings is considered a crime. For example, thoughtcrime demonstrates identity, so it is illegal. Likewise, in "The Pedestrian," life is based on the television. Because of that fact, individuality and literature are lost since no one cares about those aspects anymore. With eyes glued to the television screen, people only care about what show is coming next. The main characters are outcasts because of this theme. Winston rebels against the Party, so he commits many crimes by thinking for himself. Therefore, the Party considers him a criminal and tries to brainwash him to be a regular citizen. Leonard is the only person who appreciates nature and literature in his town. Because of his lifestyle, a police officer considers Leonard to be villain since he does not follow the crowd. Leonard and Winston are similar because they both rebel against their oppressive societies. Leonard rebels by walking, and Winston rebels with thoughtcrime and other criminal activity.
A common theme between "The Pedestrian" and "The Company Man" is the lost of individualism from different forces. Phil in "The Company Man" becomes obsessed with his work. As a result, he loses a part of himself since he does not take the time to build a relationship with the rest of his family. He turns into another gray suit who spends most of his time at work. Therefore, he is an outcast in his family. Leonard in "The Pedestrian" witnesses the citizens in his community lose their identities from only watching television. He refuses to join the majority, so he continues to possess his individuality. His uniqueness causes him to be an outcast.
People who experience less human relationships lose part of their identity. This is a common theme between "The Pedestrian" and
Brave New World
. The average citizen in "The Pedestrian" spends most of his time in front of his television. As a result, the denizen experiences less human contact and relationships, which causes him to lose a part of his uniqueness. If everyone stares at the television, no one is different from another person. Likewise, the citizens in
Brave New World
have no relationships with others because of their culture. Therefore, the denizens lose their distinctiveness because mostly everyone performs the same activities as the next person. Since no one reads literature and has hobbies, nothing differentiates the people in this society. Leonard witnesses this theme when his community stops enjoying nature and stays inside to watch television. Therefore, Leonard becomes an outsider because he is the only person who walks to enjoy nature. Similarly, John observes people in the World State never experiencing true emotion beside happiness. Every person in that society only takes soma and engages in sexual activity for fun. John refuses to become a mindless zombie like them, so he becomes an outcast and tries to live in solitude. John and Leonard are similar because they both voluntarily become outcasts in their societies.
"The Company Man" and
1984
share the theme of losing identity from pressure. Phil in "The Company Man" works constantly because of his pressure upon himself to be promoted to the president position. As a result, he stays in his office to work overtime. Therefore, he becomes a shell of himself, and he loses his personality and his family. Eventually Phil becomes an outcast to his family because he turns into a zombie who only lives to work. In
1984
, the people have lost their individuality because the Party enforces its oppressive beliefs upon the citizens. The Party tortures and brainwashes the rebellious citizens until they lose their uniqueness. At first, Winston is an outcast because he tries to fight for his freedoms. However, the Party catches him and successfully converts him to a mindless follower like the rest of his society. Winston and Phil are similar because the pressure overwhelms both of them. The Party forces Winston to submit to Big Brother, while work stress eventually kills Phil.
Outcasts will fight for their personal freedoms in oppressive societies. This theme is portrayed in the four pieces of literature. Winston in
1984
realizes that the tyrannical Party has been denying its citizens' individual thoughts. He refuses to allow himself to be a feeble, brainwashed follower like the others, so he secretly rebels to obtain his personal rights. John in
Brave New World
understands that the people in the World State society do not express true emotions, resulting in less individuality. Instead of depending on a drug, soma, for elation, John believes the citizens should be dependent on nature, literature, or hobbies for joy. John witnesses that horror and chooses to leave the society to be an outcast, so he can continue to express his individuality. Leonard in "The Pedestrian" recognizes that his society also has lost its identity from only focusing on television. Since Leonard continues to enjoy nature and to read and to write literature, he refrains from losing his personality. Phil in "The Company Man" is a little different from the other outcasts. He is an outcast because he has already succumbed to the pressure at his work. His work is an oppressive environment because of all the competition. Everyone wants to be promoted, so everyone tries to work harder to impress the boss. Phil thinks that if he works harder, he can earn his freedom and his family with a promotion. However, he has already lost his identity as a father and a husband to his family, causing him to be a pariah. This theme connects all the outcasts of these different stories together since outcasts will always desire their personal rights and freedoms.


"'We also predestine and condition. We decant our babies as socialized human beings, as Alphas or Epsilons, as future sewage workers or future '"

"'The lower the caste,' said Mr. Foster, 'the shorter the oxygen." The first organ affected was the brain. '"

"'...there's always soma to give you a holiday from the facts. And there's always soma to calm your anger, to reconcile you to your enemies, to make you patient and long-suffering. '"

"'What you need,' the Savage went on, 'is something with tears for a change. Nothing costs enough here.'"


Thematic Ideas
The outcast can try to rebel from society but eventually the larger community will overwhelm the outcast.

Outcasts will seek the truth in a society filled with lies.

Outcasts will fight for their individuality in bland, uniform communities.
Text Evidence
"But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother."

"He had still, he reflected, not learned the ultimate secret. He understood HOW; he did not understand WHY."

"Their embrace had been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the Party. It was a political act."
The Outcast:
Text Evidence

"The street was silent and long and empty, with only his shadow moving like the shadow of a hawk in mid-country."

"Magazines and books didn't sell any more. Everything went on in the tomb-like houses at night now, he thought, continuing his fancy. The tombs, ill-lit by television light, where the people sat like the dead, the grey or multi-coloured lights touching their faces, but never really touching them."

"'And you have a viewing screen in your house to see with?
'No.'
'No?' There was a crackling quiet that in itself was an accusation."

"'Nobody wanted me,' said Leonard Mead with a smile."
Thematic Ideas
The Outcast
Thematic Ideas
Text Evidence
The Outcast
Thematic Ideas
Text Evidence
Thematic Similarities
Thematic Similarities
Thematic Similarities
Thematic Similarities
Thematic Similarities
Thematic Similarities
Thematic Connections With Four Pieces of Literature
The Outcast
Introduction
Full transcript