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Argumentative essays

Structure of essay and formulating thesis and topic sentences
by

Lydia Chen

on 14 August 2010

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Transcript of Argumentative essays

Argumentative essays Formulating thesis statements and topic sentences
Structure of an
argumentative essay Introduction • Begin your essay with an interesting yet relevant start
• Thesis statement
Supporting Paragraphs (3-4) Start each paragraph with a topic sentence • Stick to ONE POINT for each paragraph & give evidence •Always link your point back to your main argument at the end of each paragraph (Transition sentence) Conclusion Synthesize all your points OR
• Reinforce your main argument
More about Introduction 1. Introduce the problem and give background information necessary for the argument and the thesis. 2.You can start with:
•A startling situation or statistic
•Intriguing question
•Powerful description
What is a thesis statement? • it is a complete sentence that clearly and concisely
informs the reader of your stand in the first paragraph • —it should cover only what you will
discuss in your paper and should be
supported with specific evidence. •is short and clear. •argues the point/position not summarize information/ facts. •is an assertion (claim/ declaration)
not a statement of fact/observation. • takes a stand, not announcing a subject •is specific, not vague Example of a thesis: Title: Television has caused increased violent behaviour in teens. Discuss. Thesis (1): Television shows do contribute to the increasing violence in teens but it is not the only factor that affects this trend. Thesis (2): While it is true that television may be to blame for increased violence, it would be unfair to consider television as the sole factor. REMEMBER! It is not a fact/ observation:
Television shows are increasingly violent.
It is not an announcement:
The thesis of this paper is that television
is a potential cause of violent behaviour.
It is not vague:
Television may or may not be blamed for violent behaviour
as we must consider the advantages and disadvantages of television.
ALSO... The thesis statement usually appears at the end of the first paragraph of a paper. Your topic may change as you write, so you may need to revise your thesis statement to reflect exactly what you have discussed in the paper.

Example: Identify the thesis statement
Many women in the entire world have abortions. Women believe there are many reasons to abort such as fear of having or raising a child, rape, or not having enough money. But whatever the situation, there is never an acceptable reason to get an abortion. Some important reasons why women should not abort have to do with human values, religious values, and values of conscience.
After writing the thesis statement… • Briefly and clearly mention 3 main arguments •This is what you will elaborate on in your essay Supporting Paragraphs Each paragraph should
employ the
P-E-E principle! POINT EXAMPLE EXPLANATION The topic sentence (point) is usually the first sentence of the paragraph, which gives the readers an idea of the content of the paragraph. It clearly states the first man point. Give specific examples to support your main point! Include explanations about how your examples
support the topic sentence. Moving from one paragraph to another... Use transition words to introduce the next point. You can use: First, Furthermore, Another, Besides, Although, Consequently, Additionally, Next, In addition to, Instead of, Rather than, Similarly, Therefore, On the other hand, However, Finally Example: Identify the main topic sentence, example and explanation in the paragraph. Finally, the third and most important reason why women should not abort is related to her conscience. When a woman has an abortion, she will always think about the baby she might have had. She will always believe about the future that could have happened with her baby which will always remind her that she killed it. Since she has had an abortion, she will never have a good life, and her conscience will remind her of what she had done. A woman who has an abortion can’t forget about what she has done, these thoughts will always be with her, and the results can be disastrous.

Conclusion A good conclusion should:
1.Stress the importance of the thesis statement
2.Give the essay a sense of completeness
3.Leave a final impression on the reader
Suggested ways to write your conclusion:
•Synthesize, instead of just summarizing all your points
•Reinforce your main argument or stand
TRY IT!
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