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Isle Royale

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by

Barbie Ronald

on 3 May 2010

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Transcript of Isle Royale



Otters:
The river otter is the longest of our weasels. Its length is about 3 to 4 feet. River otters have webbed toes water-resistant fur suite. Otters sometimes paddle but most of the time they swim like an eel. River Otters are brown with silver on the belly. Otters are about twice a s long as a weasel and five times heavy as a mink. Isle royale is a very popular spot for river otters because there are not a lot of people on the island and if there are people on the island they are most likely researchers.
Water Animals of Isle Royale
Mink:
Mink are also part of the weasel family. They are smaller then their cousin the river otter. They have long bodies with short tails and cute little ears. They have ark brown fur. And weigh between 1 ½ and 3 ½, only 10% of the weight of their cousins the otters. Mink can be mistaken for baby otters.

Beavers:
Beavers are North Americas biggest rodent. They have large bodies, with short legs, small eyes and ears and big front teeth. They have brown fur that looks black. Beavers are heavier than otters. Weighing between 30 and 60lbs. Their head and body are about 3feet long. Also the thing that people remember the most about beavers are probably their tails. Which ranges from 9inches to 10inches.

http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/SpeciesOfConcern/Mammals/RiverOtter.htm
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