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Difference between Health Education and Health Promotion

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Chubby Cheeko

on 12 October 2012

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Transcript of Difference between Health Education and Health Promotion

HEALTH EDUCATION > Modification of Health Behaviors.
> Profession of educating people about health. Functions of communication in nursing: GROUP 2 Difference between Health Education
and
Health Promotion HEALTH EDUCATION
WHO – comprising of consciously constructed opportunities for learning involving some form of communication designed to improve health literacy, including improving knowledge, and developing life skills which are conducive to individual and community health. HEALTH EDUCATION
Downie, Fyfe, and Tannahill > communication activity aimed at enhancing positive health and preventing ill-health in individuals and groups through influencing the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of those with power and of the community at large. HEALTH EDUCATION

> The 2000 Joint Committee on Health Education and Promotion Terminology
> any combination of planned learning experiences based on sound theories that provides individual, group, or community the opportunity to acquire information and the skills needed to make quality health decisions. HEALTH EDUCATION→

Green and Kreuter
> any planned combination of learning experiences designed to predispose, enable, and reinforce voluntary behavior conducive to health in individual, group, or communities. HEALTH PROMOTION

* American Journal of Health Promotion
(“first and best known”) - The science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health HEALTH PROMOTION

WHO - the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health. HEALTH PROMOTION

Green and Kreuter
– any planned combination of educational, political, regulatory, and organizational support for actions and conditions of living conducive to the health of individuals, group, and communities. HEALTH PROMOTION

The 2000 Joint Committee on Health Education and Promotion Terminology

> any planned combination of educational, political, environmental, regulatory, or organizational mechanisms that support actions and conditions of living conducive to the health of individuals, group, and communities. HEALTH PROMOTION

Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion
> the process of enabling people to increase control over, and to improve their health HEALTH EDUCATION

> Systematic, planned application, which qualifies it as a science. HEALTH PROMOTION

> Systematic, planned application, which qualifies it as a science. HEALTH EDUCATION

> The delivery of Health Education involves a set of techniques rather than just one. HEALTH PROMOTION

> *It entails methods beyond mere education. HEALTH EDUCATION

> It encompass a wider range of functions, including community mobilization, networking, and advocacy which are now embodied in the term Health Promotion. HEALTH PROMOTION

Fundamental Factors:
> Quality of individual’s genetic potentials.
> Quality of environment which person lives.
> Person’s intellectual development in matters concerned with health. HEALTH EDUCATION

> *Draws attention to voluntary behavioral actions. HEALTH PROMOTION

> It does not endorse voluntary change in behavior but utilizes measures that compel an individual’s behavior change. HEALTH EDUCATION

> It encompass a wider range of functions, including community mobilization, networking, and advocacy which are now embodied in the term Health Promotion. HEALTH EDUCATION

Primary purpose > is to influence antecedents of behavior so that healthy behaviors develop in a voluntary fashion. HEALTH PROMOTION

*Primary purpose > enable people to gain greater control over the the determinants of their health and developing healthy public policy that addresses the prerequisites of health. HEALTH PROMOTION

Mechanism of Health Promotion:

 
> Self-care
> Mutual aid
> Healthy Environment HEALTH EDUCATION

Performed at several levels:
> One-on-one
> Group of people
> Organizational level
> Community level Criticism of Health Education
and
Emergence of Health Promotion Myths About Health Education > Health Education is primarily a program of instruction. > Health Education is concerned with disease entities. > Health Education is primarily a study of human anatomy and physiology. > It is important for people to memorize a body of health facts if they are to become healthier. Myths About Health Education Myths About Health Education Myths About Health Education

>Health Education is an opportunity for the health educator to tell people how to live healthfully. Myths About Health Education Basic Considerations
to
Health Promotion and Education 1. The Settings for
Health Promotion
and
Health Education
> Schools

> Worksites

> Health care organizations

> Health departments

> Voluntary health agencies

> Community settings Comparison of Settings Setting Primary Mission Who is Served School Education Children/adolescents Worksite Produce goods and services; Make a profit (if applicable) Consumers of products and services Hospitals Treat illness and
trauma Patients Community primary care setting Prevent, detect, and treat illness and trauma Patients Health Department Chronic and infectious disease prevention and control Public Voluntary health agencies Prevention and control targeted disease/condition Public 2. Factors related to
Health Promotion and Education Communication > The basic elements of human interactions that allow people to establish, maintain, and improve contacts with others. > To gather information

> To exert influence. Use communication technique when helping clients to change attitudes, beliefs and actions:
a.To provide comfort
b.To promote relations
c.To establish identity Characteristics of communication > Credibility

> Clarity

> Brevity

> Simplicity

> Timing and relevance

> Adaptability and flexibility

> Intonation Factors influencing communication Development – the environment provided by parents during childhood affects the ability to communicate.

Perception – a personal view of events.

Values – standards that influence behavior, what a person considers important in life and, therefore, influence expression of thoughts and ideas.

Emotions – a person’s subjective feeling about events. They influence the ability to successfully receive a message.

Sociocultural background – communication style is highly dependent on cultural factors.

Gender – men and women have different communication styles.

Knowledge – a common language is important when communicating across different knowledge levels.

Roles and relationship

Environment – people tend to communicate more effectively in a comfortable environment. Methods of effective
nursing communication: > Listen attentively
> Convey acceptance
> Ask related questions
> Paraphrase
> Focus
> State observation
> Offer information
> Silence
> Be assertive
> Summarize Barriers to effective communication: > Giving an opinion
> Giving false reassurance
> Being defensive
> Showing approval or disapproval
> Stereotyping
> Asking why
> Hanging the topic inappropriately Communication Health education occurs in a variety of places, these include: School Health Education Themes

1. Education and health are interrelated.

2. The biggest threats to health are “social morbidities.”

3. A more comprehensive, integrated approach is needed.

4. Health promotion and education efforts should be centered in and around school.

5. Prevention efforts are cost-effective; the social and economic costs of inaction are too high and still escalating. Healthy School Environment

> The physical and aesthetic surroundings and the psychosocial climate and culture of the school.

> The psychological environment includes the physical, emotional, and social conditions that affect the well-being of students and staff. Worksite Health Education Programs

> Physical activity and fitness

> Nutrition and weight control

> Stress reduction

> Worker safety and health

> Blood pressure and/or cholesterol education and control

> Alcohol, smoking and drugs Health Care Settings

> In the hospital, direct patient education is part of ongoing patient care and is typically delivered by nurses and physicians

> Group health education on such topics as diabetes and prenatal care are also provided. Community / Primary care settings

> Direct health services are offered by the local health departments.

> Planning, Consultation, vital statistics, laboratory services, regulation, and coordination functions occur at the state as well as the local levels.

> Health educators work in family planning, nutrition, dental health, tobacco control, chronic disease, AIDS, immunizations, and communicable diseases, Objectives for Educational and Community-Based Programs by Settings Setting Objectives School Increase to at least 75% the proportion of the nation's elementary and secondary schools that provide planned and sequential kindergarten through twelfth-grade quality school health education. Worksite Increase to at least 50% the proportion of postsecondary institutions with institution-wide health promotion programs for students, faculty and staff. Health care provider Increase to at least 90% the proportion of hospitals, and health maintenance organizations, that provide patient education programs, and to at least 90% the proportion of community hospitals that offer community health promotion programs addressing the priority health needs of their communities. Community Increase to at least 50% the proportion of counties that have established culturally and linguistically appropriate community health promotion programs for racial and ethnic minority populations. Setting Objective Culture Environment
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