Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls

No description
by

Agnes M.

on 4 March 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls

the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls
Poem
the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls
are unbeautiful and have comfortable minds
(also, with the church’s protestant blessings
daughters, unscented shapeless spirited)
they believe in Christ and Longfellow,both dead,
are invariably interested in so many things-
at the present writing one still finds
delighted fingers knitting for the is it Poles?
perhaps. While permanent faces coyly bandy
scandal or Mrs. N. and Professor D.
...the Cambridge ladies do not care, about
Cambridge is sometimes in its box of
sky lavender and cornerless, the
moon rattles like a fragment of angry candy

Form/Structure
Form/Structure cont..
Use of parentheses to add in an Idea
Long sentences that sometimes end in the middle of the line
The last line does not end in a period, implying that he had more to say on the topic, not a definite ending

Rhyme/Meter
Use of parentheses to add in an Idea
Long sentences that sometimes end in the middle of the line
the last line does not end in a period, implying that he had more to say on the topic, not a definite ending

Rhyme Schme: ABCDDCBAEFGGFE

Literary Techniques/Sound Devices
“...the Cambridge ladies” comes back to the the beginning
Written as a type of satirical approach to the women of Cambridge
“Mrs. N. and Professor D.” playful and simple sounding but carries a lot meaning
Easy to read, like a short story or a conversation. The language is meant to be relatable to the readers.
It sounds a lot more innocent and carefree then it actually is.
Alliteration: “shapeless spirited”
Allusion: Longfellow (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), renown American literary figure and Jesus Christ, religious figure


Transition words/phrases: “...the Cambridge ladies do not care”
Key lines: “the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls are unbeautiful and have comfortable minds”
Grammar: no use of capital letters at the beginning of a line
Cummings mocks the ladies who are depicted as indifferent to the world around them


Symbols/Allusions
“furnished souls” they have all the possessions that they need, they fill themselves with earthly wants versus thoughts or spiritual fulfillment.
“in its box of sky lavender and cornerless, the moon rattles like a fragment of angry candy” the society ladies live in an isolated and artificial world
“comfortable mind” they live in their own world where they do not have have to worry about anything.
“Delighted fingers knitting for is it the Poles?’ they are doing charity work but they don’t even know who they are really doing
Assumed reference to their knitting for wartime relief purposes
“(also, with the Church’s protestant blessings daughters, unscented shapeless spirited)” He is adding in how the church ladies go about as holy women but in reality there is not that much to them and their spirits are bland.
Tone
Tone(s):mock-serious, critical, haughty, Ironic and ridiculing
Uses precise diction and literary devices to create a critical approach towards ladies nature
Creates Images of the Ladies' activities and points out how meaninglessness they are

Theme
A Satirical look on how the people of Cambridge think of themselves and how they really look versus how they actually appear
People pretending to be deeper than they actually are
Ironic since the author is from the Cambridge area, and is well-distinguished

Relate it back to the poem
The author wrote this poem to point out the emptiness of the Cambridge Society with humor
The poem deals with a big topic matter but in a way that makes light on the matter
He uses examples, imagery and metaphors to get his points across
Basically in the poem he is saying that although these women act like good, important and charitable ladies, in reality they are shallow. They have no thoughts in their minds beyond what is immediately about them or is idle gossip and any charity they do is not done out of the goodness of their hearts but because they want to show others how charitable they are.
In modern terms, he is calling them “airheads”

Poet Biography

E.E Cummings (1894-1962)
Edward Estlin Cummings was born on October 14, 1894 in Boston Massachusetts. Cumings expressed a passion for literature and poetry at an early age, but decided to pursue a collegiate level education in poetry at the renown Harvard. There he went on to receive both a bachelor and master’s degree from the university. While at Harvard he was a member of the Harvard Poetry society and co-wrote a collection of poems called the Eight Harvard Poets. Post Harvard, Cummings volunteered in France during World War I and afterwards was eventually drafted into the army. He returned to the country, and married Elaine Thayer, but divorced her in 1924. Cummings wrote based on his experiences in France, and received major recognition for his collection of poems Tulips and Chimneys. Though he died in 1962, E.E Cummings is remembered for his poetic legacy and unique writing style
Edward Estlin Cummings
Full transcript