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korean war

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Aiden Urey

on 2 April 2014

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Transcript of korean war

war starts June 25, 1950
before any reinforcement, it was just North against the South
North made first move and attacked South
no former declaration of war
first Northern attacks considered "full scale war"
South military strength affected by Japanese rule
attacks result of election disagreements
North couldn't take over South peacefully
North quickly captured Seoul
South retreated to defend Pusan Perimeter
Monday, February 17, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Causes of the Korean War
Korea: Before The War
Armistice Agreement
The Korean War
1950-1953
By: Samuel Bekele, Ben Davis, and Aiden Urey
signed 7/27/1953 at Panmunjom
signed by General Harrison representing South, General Nam II representing communists
DMZ stands for "Demilitarized Zone"
DMZ line seperates North and South Korea
was initiated after war by armistice agreement
one of the most heavily armed borders in the world, still in effect
have to stop rienforcements of any form
4 officers of other nations to "police" North/South for armistice violations
prisoners to be exchanged at Panmujom (called "Gate to Freedom)
only participated as "police action" - Harry Truman
General Douglas MacArthur in control of South allied forces
MacArthur thought war would be over by Christmas
US in battle because of United Nations
first war that UN
fought
in, ironically to prevent war (collective security)
US also wanted to stop communism spread
US was political rivals with North Korea's allies; helped develop Cold War
MacArthur resorted to sending troops over 38th Parallel & attacking North with air force
both sides collected enemy prisoners
Japan used as base for rienforcements
Chinese forces allied with North Korea
wanted to stop US from preventing anti-communist attacks
MacArthur dismissed previous attack threats, hoped war would end early
first attack October 1950 over Yalu River
size of Chinese army underestimated
China responsible for lots of South Korean and US casualties
MacArthur's decision lead to being replaced by General Ridgway
Extra Extra Read All About It
https://mouonekorea.wordpress.com/2011/10/
Korea Seperates From Japan
high death toll on both sides
560,000 United Nation troops were killed
1.6 million Communist soldiers killed
estimated 3 million civilians killed
sides accused each other of abusing prisoners
property damage about $1 billion for South Korea
South Korea now one of world's largest economies
North Korea still military driven nation; nuclear threat to other countries
Korean War nicknamed "Forgotten War" by US veterans
only 1.8 million served compared to 16 million in WWII
sandwiched in between WWII and Cold War
only said to be policing Korea
marines not thrilled/scared to deploy to Korea
realistically one of the more gruesome wars
1951-1953 nicknamed "Battle for the Hills"
many wars to gain better positioning
fought mainly with infantry due to difficult terrain
temperatures went below 0 degrees
Northern troops disguised by wearing clothes of dead enemies and white in snow
Ridgway still trying to settle peace with North
colony of Japan from 1910-1945
previously known as "Hermit Kingdom"
was a united country
split up after Japanese surrender
North became communist and South became democratic
38th Parallel represented political border
Affects Of The War
Korean War Starts
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/north-korea-celebrates-birthday-first-1833272
http://www.findingdulcinea.com/news/on-this-day/June/Truman-Orders-Troops-Into-Korea.html
US Enters The Battle
"The Forgotten War"
China Attacks South Korea
1951-1953 In The Korean War
seperation caused cultural / political disagreements
North was communist and South was democratic
both wanted to diminish border
both wanted to rule with their form of government
election for controlling government to be held in South by National Assembly
North refused to participate in election
Kim Il-Sung took over throne in North
North Korea wanted absolute control over South Korea
protestors of both countries kept crossing 38th Parallel illegally
Armstrong, Charles K. "Korean War." World Book Advanced. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. <http://www.worldbookonline.com/>.
"Cause and Effects of Korean War." Emagasia. N.p., 2012. Web. 16 Mar. 2014. <http://www.emagasia.com/>.
Cavendish, Richard. "The Korean War Begins: June 25th, 1950." History Today 7 Sept. 2000: 54. History Study Center. Web. 10 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.
Edidin, Peter. "Korea: And Then There Were Two." New York Times Upfront 5 Dec. 2005: n. pag. SIRS Discoverer. Web. 6 Mar. 2014. <http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/>.
"Gate to Freedom." History Study Center. N.p., 11 Aug. 1953. Web. 23 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.
Hickman, Kennedy. "The Korean War: The Forgotten Conflict." About.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2014. <http://militaryhistory.about.com/>.
"Korean War." World History: The Modern Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2014. <http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com/>.
Latimer, Hugh, and Ivison S. Macadam. "The Korean Armistice Agreement." The Annual Register 1954: n. pag. History Study Center. Web. 24 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.
Pitts, Edward Lee. "Remembering the Forgotten War." World Magazine 10 Aug. 2013: n. pag. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 23 Mar. 2014. <http://sks.sirs.com/>.
"United Nations: Report on Korea (1950)." World History: The Modern Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Mar. 2014.
Walker, Gordon. "US Troops Enter Korea." Christian Science Moniter 28 June 1950: n. pag. History Study Center. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.

WORK CITED
http://i2.wp.com/sinonk.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/china_crosses_yalu.jpg?resize=600%2C390
Ben:

<http://militaryhistory.about.com/>.
"Korean War." World History: The Modern Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2014. <http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com/>.
Latimer, Hugh, and Ivison S. Macadam. "The Korean Armistice Agreement." The Annual Register 1954: n. pag. History Study Center. Web. 24 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>. Web. 23 Mar. 2014. <http://sks.sirs.com/>.
"United Nations: Report on Korea (1950)." World History: The Modern Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Mar. 2014.
Walker, Gordon. "US Troops Enter Korea." Christian Science Moniter 28 June 1950: n. pag. History Study Center. Web. 17 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.Armstrong, Charles K. "Korean War." World Book Advanced. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. <http://www.worldbookonline.com/>.<http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/>.
"Gate to Freedom." History Study Center. N.p., 11 Aug. 1953. Web. 23 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.<http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com/>.
Latimer, Hugh, and Ivison S. Macadam. "The Korean Armistice Agreement." The Annual Register 1954: n. pag. History Study Center. Web. 24 Mar. 2014. <http://www.historystudycenter.com/>.
Pitts, Edward Lee. "Remembering the Forgotten War."






Samuel Bekele
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