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Copy of Camera Movements

Lesson plan 106: Cinematography 2: Camera Movements and Camera Angles
by

David Ernsberger

on 20 September 2010

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Transcript of Copy of Camera Movements

This is a TRIPOD There are two major parts
to the tripod: The Head
And the Legs
(There are three; tri=3)




There are two types of
tripod heads: FRICTION HEADS FLUID HEADS We will use (if they're not broken)
friction head tripods. All tripods have a
QUICK RELEASE PLATE. This attaches to the bottom
of the camera to help it come
off the tripod easier. On the tripod, you must know the location of
THREE THINGS: The Pan Lock: Here is the pan lock as
a lever instead of the handle. Here is the pan lock on the handle.
You twist it to loosen, and move it
left and right to pan. On our tripods, the
tilt lock is the same handle.
Twist to loosen, and move it
up and down to tilt. Here is the tilt lock as a lever. The DUTCH TILT lock
will look the same, but do
something weird... These flip-out latches
loosen and tighten
the tripod legs for
two levels of
height adjustment. You can raise the head of the tripod with this lever. When you walk away from the tripod,
LOCK IT DOWN!!! The Tilt
Lock: or... REMEMBER the camera represents a viewer watching the action! Therefore, “normal” shots are taken at around EYE LEVEL (this will be lower or higher depending on whether the talent is standing or sitting) The term camera angle means slightly different things to different people but it always refers to the way a shot is composed. Some people use it to include all camera shot types; others use it to specifically mean the angle between the camera and the subject. This is what we are doing. Obviously, all these things can be combined with each other AND (most importantly) with the camera movements. Cinematography 2
Camera Movements &
Camera Angles
(and the tripod) We will refer back to this graphic as a reference. Eye-Level - A fairly neutral shot; the camera is positioned as though it is a human actually observing a scene, so that the actors' heads are on a level with the focus. The camera will be placed approximately five to six feet from the ground (lower if sitting). "Citizen Kane," the most influential
film in American cinema, pushed the
boundaries of cinematography while
maintaining roots in established film rules. THE EYE-LEVEL SHOT Eye-Level - A fairly neutral shot; the camera is positioned as though it is a human actually observing a scene, so that the actors' heads are on a level with the focus. The camera will be placed approximately five to six feet from the ground (lower if sitting). THE EYE-LEVEL SHOT The Eye-Level shots put the viewer
right in the action because that's how a viewer would see it. First the "neutral" or "normal"
or "eye-level" view High Angle High Angle – camera is ABOVE eye level; A high angle shows the subject from above. The camera is angled down towards the subject. This has the effect of diminishing the subject, making them appear less powerful, less significant or even submissive. Although the dramatic lighting and camera angles did not win an Oscar in 1941, to this day, film critics, lovers, and teachers use "Citizen Kane" cinematography as examples of groundbreaking shots and techinques. Here are Orson Welles and Gregg Toland framing a shot. Again, camera up high, aiming down. This is a JIB.
We use it to
achieve
High Angle
shots... ...to get those high angle shots like in football, for example. The Zip-Cam. The only thing higher than
the High Angle shot is the
Bird's Eye; and that's... Eye-Level
STANDING Eye-Level
CROUCHING HIGH ANGLE HIGH ANGLE HIGH ANGLE ...or use a ladder... Where the camera's up high. Where everything's really, really small and the camera's really, really high. Ok, well, maybe not this high.
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