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Galleries and Artspaces

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Gillian Crothers

on 10 October 2013

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Transcript of Galleries and Artspaces

Galleries and Artspaces
Characteristics
of Art Spaces


There are a number of different art museum and gallery types in Australia. They tend to fall in the following categories;


Public Galleries and Museums
“A public art museum is an art museum, gallery or art space that is owned by or on behalf of the public.”
- Public Galleries Association of Victoria

Museums aim to elevate the knowledge of the general public through the arts by collecting, preserving, researching and exhibiting art works. The earliest galleries and museums or ‘Cabinets of Curiosities’ were owned by wealthy families and individuals who allowed their collections to be shown to the public, particularly the upper classes.

In 2002, Museums Australia, the professional body representing museums, defines a 'museum' as an institution which:
“helps people understand the world by using objects and ideas to interpret the past and present and explore the future. A museum preserves and researches collections, and makes objects and information accessible in actual and virtual environments. Museums are established in the public interest as permanent, not-for-profit organisations that contribute long-term value to communities.”
Museums Australia Constitution (2002)

The International Council of Museums defines a museum as:
“a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study and enjoyment.”


Private Museums & Collections
Other spaces in which art is shown include private and corporate collections. Art is shown in hotel foyers, banks, boardrooms and corporate offices. Companies that invest in contemporary art seek artworks do so to project an image of being progressive, dynamic market leaders to attract the best staff and clients.
Commercial Galleries
Commercial galleries are private businesses that operate to make a profit or provide an income for their owners and the artists they represent. Commercial Gallerists act as agents for the artists they represent. They provide exhibition space for their ‘stable’ of artists to promote and sell artworks in addition to holding stock in their back rooms to show potential buyers. They also act as spokes people to represent the commercial interests of their artists by providing information to public galleries and museums that may wish to exhibit or reproduce works by those artists. Examples of commercial galleries in Melbourne are; Sutton Gallery , Utopian Slumps and Port Art.




Artist-run Initiatives (ARIs)
Artist-run Initiatives are art spaces that are run in the style of a co-operative and funded by its members. They are commonly the first place that art school graduates get to show their work. Many ARIs are established by student groups as they move out of formal education and want to maintain relationships and incentives to continue their art practice in a supported way. The artists involved create the rules of the space. Some groups formalise their agreements by becoming Incorporated Associations or Not-for-profits, which allows them to qualify to apply for government grants to support the expenses incurred related to the running of their art spaces.

Examples of artist run spaces are Kings Gallery - King Street, West Space - Bourke Street and No Vacancy in the QV Building.
Virtual or Online Galleries
Virtual or Online Galleries
Opportunities for showing art online have increased greatly in recent years, and the environment is constantly changing. Artists at any level of experience, from any location around the world, can now post their artworks online – this has democratised the exhibition and sales process. Digital artists may use the online environment as their display medium of choice. It is also very easy to establish systems for payment in order to sell artworks. People are becoming used to buying things online and use services such as Pay Pal to exchange goods and services.




Many artists find that to approach a local cafe and ask to hang your works in it is a good way to raise your arts profile. Cafe owners are often quite happy to have works on display in their cafes. Many don’t charge a fee and direct enquiries directly to the artist. Some cafes have very organised systems in place with formal agreements to ensure that the obligations and expectations of each party are clearly set out. A good example of this is at The Old Fire Station Cafe Gallery. An application form can be downloaded from their website for people who would like to display their work.

public museums and galleries, (eg, NGV, ACCA, HEIDI)

private museums and collections, (eg, MONA)
commercial galleries, (eg, Brunswick Street Gallery)

• artist-run initiatives (ARIs) such as Seventh Gallry and;
• alternative spaces such as Dudespace.
The art market is further broken down into two types;

• The
primary market,
when artworks are purchased directly from the artist or their representative

• The
secondary art market
refers to auction houses and art dealers who on-sell artworks that are
already on the market and profits raised from these sales do not go back to the artist.

A public gallery or art museum:

• is an institution that is
owned by, or on behalf of the public
• is a properly and
legally constituted arts facility
• is
professionally and permanently staffed

• is a
not-for-profit organisation
and
who reinvests profits from commercial activities back into its operational costs
• meets a
clear and identified need within its community
• receives the
majority of its funding
for administrative and operational purposes from
government, or
from a public body such as a university
In some countries the word
‘museum’
distinguishes a collecting institution from a gallery that only displays art- works, but in Australia the two words are
frequently interchanged.
The Sofitel Melbourne collects artworks and presents a series of temporary exhibitions of design, craft, photography, painting and drawing that change on a regular basis throughout the year.

Larger corporate collections (such as the Deutche Bank Collection) are curated and managed by art consultants or collection managers. Artworks in corporate collections are frequently drawn upon by museums to be included in public exhibitions.


Artworks can also be leased by organisations such as Artbank. Artbank is a government entity that purchases artworks which it then leases to public or private businesses.
Corporate and private collectors may have purchased art directly from a commercial gallery or an artist-run space. Other places where they may have purchased art include auction houses or art dealers.
Increasingly commercial galleries also develop an online presence to promote their artists and often have excellent information such as biographies and essays in addition to images. They also act as agents on behalf of their artists to people and organisations to commission artworks.
Their artists may be supported by grants, such as those offered by the Australia Council, Arts Victoria or prestigious awards such as the Samstag International Visual Arts Scholarship.

Commercial galleries generate income by taking a percentage of the sales. This commission varies from gallery to gallery and tends to be between 15 to 40 per cent. Some commercial galleries charge artists a fee to hire the gallery exhibition space and expect the artist to arrange for someone to mind the gallery while it is open. A good commercial gallery will strive to ensure that their artists are marketed well and that their work comes to the attention of larger collecting institutions and significant commissions.
Commercial galleries do not receive public funding for their day-to-day activities.
Sometimes the intention of avant-garde or cutting edge artists is to simply create a space to display their work and they do not expect buyers. This allows the artist’s complete control of the work they make as it is not influenced by the needs of a commercial market. Many artists who work within this model are critical of the art market and how it determines the value of some art over other art. Sometimes work is ephemeral or of a transitory nature. These spaces give artists direct control over the means and conditions of presenting their work to the public. Exhibition programs are usually determined collectively, with the group of artists running the gallery assessing proposals. Often the exhibiting artist staffs the gallery while their show is open.
Professional Roles within the Museum
Staff members at Heide Museum of Modern Art work very closely together to fulfil the various functions of a public art museum – to acquire, care for and conserve works of art, to develop varied exhibitions from the collection and other sources, to present education and public programs, to develop and care for the garden and heritage buildings, to market and promote all its programs, and to attract funding and sponsorship and develop partnerships to support all these activities.
Although each staff member is assigned different responsibilities, museum work is collaborative and their roles often overlap. For example, a public programs co-ordinator may work collaboratively with a curator, in consultation with a marketing manager, to create a feature event in conjunction with an exhibition opening. Similarly, different staff members are involved in the preservation of artworks: the collection manager and curators are responsible for safe handling and storage practices, while visitor services officers monitor the daily security of artworks on display.
Professional roles at Heide can be grouped into three areas:
• Programming (collection, exhibition, education and public programs), and
• Marketing and development;
• Financial, commercial and operational (including gardeners). 
The following list key duties of a selection of Heide staff: 
Director
• Providing vision, direction and strategy for Heide in accordance with the Corporate Business Plan, to ensure the growth of the museum’s profile locally, nationally and internationally
• Leading the organisation in consultation with the Board; serving as liaison between the Board and staff
• Overseeing exhibitions, events and programs
• Cultivating and providing stewardship of major donors, corporate contributors and grant bodies
• Performing curatorial duties with museum curators
• Supervising the administration of museum budgets
• Supervising Heide personnel
• Attending working sessions with community groups, various fundraising events, exhibition openings, 
conferences and other professional activities, as Heide’s foremost representative. 
Curators
• Researching and interpreting artworks for collection, exhibition and publication
• Conceptualising, planning, managing and presenting exhibitions
• Writing texts on exhibitions, artworks and artists, from labels to wall texts to interpretive essays
• Delivering floor talks and occasional lectures
• Managing the production of exhibition catalogues
• Contributing to the development of exhibition program and collection policies
• Handling artworks in accordance with appropriate conservation practices and working collaboratively with 
the Registrar and Collection Manager
• Liaising with the Marketing Manager and Education and Public Programs staff to promote exhibitions. 
Collection Manager
• Supervising storage conditions for the collection
• Managing preventative conservation
• Coordinating records and documentation regarding the Collection
• Administering new acquisitions
• Administering outward loans of the Collection to other institutions for exhibitions
• Accompanying touring exhibitions or outward loans of the Collection and assisting with the installation and 
demounting of the exhibition in the host venue

©Heide MoMA 2011 Educational use only Page 24 of 51

HEIDE EDUCATION
• Observing the condition of the Collection and sourcing appropriate conservation treatment for damaged or deteriorated artworks
• At Heide, the collection manager also coordinates the installation and de-installation of artworks for each exhibition
• Organising an installation team to hang and display artworks
• Completing comprehensive documentation including condition reporting
• Coordinating display equipment, carpentry and paintings as required 
Registrar
• Coordinating records and documentation for incoming and outgoing loans of artworks for temporary exhibitions, including writing legal contracts, preparing insurance cover, organising the packing, crating and freight of artworks and undertaking other relevant safety precautions
• Supervising handling and movement of artworks. Condition reporting artworks on arrival at Heide
• Ensuring that all artworks, when on display or in storage, are cared for appropriately and environmental 
factors such as light, pollutants, humidity and temperature changes do not affect the artworks’ condition 
Public Programs Coordinator
• Initiating, organising and delivering a variety of programs directed towards a diverse range of audiences who attend the museum with an aim to increase appreciation and understanding of Heide and its exhibitions, collection, history and site
• Developing exhibition and architecture tours, artist talks, guest lectures, forums and garden events
• Managing and training of Heide’s Volunteer Guides 
Education Coordinator
• Registered and qualified arts specialist teacher
• Promoting Heide as an education resource for art
• Conducting tours of exhibitions for primary, secondary and tertiary students as well as specialist education 
groups
• Working with the curators and marketing manager to develop talks and public symposiums that 
complement the exhibition program
• Liaising with schools and university departments to provide teachers/students with access to information 
about the exhibitions
• Creating Education Resources related to Heide and the exhibition program
• Organising professional development sessions for teachers.
• Organising the school holidays activities 
Marketing & Communications Manager
• Implementing marketing to promote the museum as a significant cultural destination
• Facilitating the distribution of media releases and liaising with journalists, reporters and photographers
• Coordinating exhibition openings and events
• Development of marketing materials such as the Heide Calender, Heide Magazine, posters, signage and 
related exhibition collateral
• Liaising with designers and media buyers to implement a co-ordinated advertising campaign
• Developing and maintaining Heide’s website and electronic communications
• Managing the annual marketing budget 
Development Manager
• Responsibility over the two areas that make up Heide Development – Foundation and Partnerships
• Developing and implementing fundraising campaigns targeting both individual private donors and 
philanthropic trusts
• Liaising with Marketing and Curatorial departments to develop campaigns targeting specific areas of the 
Museum, including expanding the Collection, funding exhibition programs and sustaining Heide’s unique 
gardens
• Compiling and tracking grant applications to government agencies and philanthropic organisations

©Heide MoMA 2011 Educational use only Page 25 of 51

HEIDE EDUCATION
• Developing a list of prospective donors to expand the Museum’s donor circle
• Coordinating Foundation and Partnership events
• Negotiating and monitoring Heide’s Annual and Exhibition partners, including developing proposals, 
negotiating final agreements and delivering partner benefits 
Visitor Services Manager
• Manage front of house operations and visitor services staff including admissions, ticketing, membership, event hire and retail sales
• Manage Museum safety, security, risk assessment and occupational health and safety processes and procedures
• Manage Volunteer Program including recruitment, training, monitor and review Visitor Services Volunteers, Volunteer Guides, Education Volunteers and Interns
• Manage membership program to promote benefits that position membership as an attractive means by which to support the Museum and increase member loyalty
• Manage on-site event hire, administer filming and photography copyright agreements, oversee bookings, operational logistics and liaise with onsite caterer 
Heide Store Manager
• Managing in-store visual merchandising
• Monthly purchasing of stock based around current exhibitions and Heide categories
• Tracking and monitoring weekly retail sales targets
• Liaising and negotiating product with suppliers
• Attending bi-annual Gift Fairs and conventions
• Product development and building on the Heide range of exclusive merchandise
• Managing annual stock take 
Business, Finance & Human Resources Manager
• Drive the review and update of the Risk Management Framework and Key Strategic Risks as part of the annual and long-term strategic planning processes
• Manage all aspects of financial reporting including the preparation and distribution of monthly and annual financial reports
• Liaise with the Audit & Risk Management Committee on annual audits, emerging risks and financial and legal compliance
• Champion Sustainability as a core objective of the Museum and identify opportunities for improvement in all aspects of sustainability (environment, culture & community, governance & communications, people and finance)
• Provide advice on HR management, policy development and implementation
• Maintain Heide's HR policy and staff employment contracts and oversee their effective implementation 
and revision as required
• Manage Heide’s information technology needs and manage the Museum’s external IT consultants 
Facilities Manager
• Manage and implement service contracts
• Ensure building requirement are met and ensure compliance to Occupational Health and Safety 
standards, essential service and relevant legislation
• Develop and undertake building and maintenance projects on site
• Manage utility’s consumption and implement savings in relation to reduced energy and cost efficiency 
Head Gardener
• Coordinate all aspects of the strategic planning related to the development of Heide’s heritage gardens
• Develop and deliver high quality programming that engages the public with the Heide II Kitchen Garden, 
Heide I Vegetable Garden, the Wild Garden and the Park generally
• As resident Caretaker, be first point of contact for Emergency Services and Security in any after-hours 
emergency situations

Professional Roles within the Museum
Staff members at galleries and museums work very closely together to fullfil the various functions of a public art museum – to acquire, care for and conserve works of art, to develop varied exhibitions from the collection and other sources, to present education and public programs, to develop and care for the garden and heritage buildings, to market and promote all its programs, and to attract funding and sponsorship and develop partnerships to support all these activities.

Although each staff member is assigned different responsibilities, museum work is collaborative and their roles often overlap. For example, a public programs co-ordinator may work collaboratively with a curator, in consultation with a marketing manager, to create a feature event in conjunction with an exhibition opening. Similarly, different staff members are involved in the preservation of artworks: the collection manager and curators are responsible for safe handling and storage practices, while visitor services officers monitor the daily security of artworks on display.
Professional roles at Heide can be grouped into three areas:
• Programming (collection, exhibition, education and public programs), and
• Marketing and development;
• Financial, commercial and operational (including gardeners). 
The following list key duties of a selection of Heide staff: 
Director
• Providing vision, direction and strategy for Heide in accordance with the Corporate Business Plan, to ensure the growth of the museum’s profile locally, nationally and internationally
• Leading the organisation in consultation with the Board; serving as liaison between the Board and staff
• Overseeing exhibitions, events and programs
• Cultivating and providing stewardship of major donors, corporate contributors and grant bodies
• Performing curatorial duties with museum curators
• Supervising the administration of museum budgets
• Supervising Heide personnel
• Attending working sessions with community groups, various fundraising events, exhibition openings, 
conferences and other professional activities, as Heide’s foremost representative. 
Curators
• Researching and interpreting artworks for collection, exhibition and publication
• Conceptualising, planning, managing and presenting exhibitions
• Writing texts on exhibitions, artworks and artists, from labels to wall texts to interpretive essays
• Delivering floor talks and occasional lectures
• Managing the production of exhibition catalogues
• Contributing to the development of exhibition program and collection policies
• Handling artworks in accordance with appropriate conservation practices and working collaboratively with 
the Registrar and Collection Manager
• Liaising with the Marketing Manager and Education and Public Programs staff to promote exhibitions. 
Collection Manager
• Supervising storage conditions for the collection
• Managing preventative conservation
• Coordinating records and documentation regarding the Collection
• Administering new acquisitions
• Administering outward loans of the Collection to other institutions for exhibitions
• Accompanying touring exhibitions or outward loans of the Collection and assisting with the installation and 
demounting of the exhibition in the host venue

©Heide MoMA 2011 Educational use only Page 24 of 51

HEIDE EDUCATION
• Observing the condition of the Collection and sourcing appropriate conservation treatment for damaged or deteriorated artworks
• At Heide, the collection manager also coordinates the installation and de-installation of artworks for each exhibition
• Organising an installation team to hang and display artworks
• Completing comprehensive documentation including condition reporting
• Coordinating display equipment, carpentry and paintings as required 
Registrar
• Coordinating records and documentation for incoming and outgoing loans of artworks for temporary exhibitions, including writing legal contracts, preparing insurance cover, organising the packing, crating and freight of artworks and undertaking other relevant safety precautions
• Supervising handling and movement of artworks. Condition reporting artworks on arrival at Heide
• Ensuring that all artworks, when on display or in storage, are cared for appropriately and environmental 
factors such as light, pollutants, humidity and temperature changes do not affect the artworks’ condition 
Public Programs Coordinator
• Initiating, organising and delivering a variety of programs directed towards a diverse range of audiences who attend the museum with an aim to increase appreciation and understanding of Heide and its exhibitions, collection, history and site
• Developing exhibition and architecture tours, artist talks, guest lectures, forums and garden events
• Managing and training of Heide’s Volunteer Guides 
Education Coordinator
• Registered and qualified arts specialist teacher
• Promoting Heide as an education resource for art
• Conducting tours of exhibitions for primary, secondary and tertiary students as well as specialist education 
groups
• Working with the curators and marketing manager to develop talks and public symposiums that 
complement the exhibition program
• Liaising with schools and university departments to provide teachers/students with access to information 
about the exhibitions
• Creating Education Resources related to Heide and the exhibition program
• Organising professional development sessions for teachers.
• Organising the school holidays activities 
Marketing & Communications Manager
• Implementing marketing to promote the museum as a significant cultural destination
• Facilitating the distribution of media releases and liaising with journalists, reporters and photographers
• Coordinating exhibition openings and events
• Development of marketing materials such as the Heide Calender, Heide Magazine, posters, signage and 
related exhibition collateral
• Liaising with designers and media buyers to implement a co-ordinated advertising campaign
• Developing and maintaining Heide’s website and electronic communications
• Managing the annual marketing budget 
Development Manager
• Responsibility over the two areas that make up Heide Development – Foundation and Partnerships
• Developing and implementing fundraising campaigns targeting both individual private donors and 
philanthropic trusts
• Liaising with Marketing and Curatorial departments to develop campaigns targeting specific areas of the 
Museum, including expanding the Collection, funding exhibition programs and sustaining Heide’s unique 
gardens
• Compiling and tracking grant applications to government agencies and philanthropic organisations

©Heide MoMA 2011 Educational use only Page 25 of 51

HEIDE EDUCATION
• Developing a list of prospective donors to expand the Museum’s donor circle
• Coordinating Foundation and Partnership events
• Negotiating and monitoring Heide’s Annual and Exhibition partners, including developing proposals, 
negotiating final agreements and delivering partner benefits 
Visitor Services Manager
• Manage front of house operations and visitor services staff including admissions, ticketing, membership, event hire and retail sales
• Manage Museum safety, security, risk assessment and occupational health and safety processes and procedures
• Manage Volunteer Program including recruitment, training, monitor and review Visitor Services Volunteers, Volunteer Guides, Education Volunteers and Interns
• Manage membership program to promote benefits that position membership as an attractive means by which to support the Museum and increase member loyalty
• Manage on-site event hire, administer filming and photography copyright agreements, oversee bookings, operational logistics and liaise with onsite caterer 
Heide Store Manager
• Managing in-store visual merchandising
• Monthly purchasing of stock based around current exhibitions and Heide categories
• Tracking and monitoring weekly retail sales targets
• Liaising and negotiating product with suppliers
• Attending bi-annual Gift Fairs and conventions
• Product development and building on the Heide range of exclusive merchandise
• Managing annual stock take 
Business, Finance & Human Resources Manager
• Drive the review and update of the Risk Management Framework and Key Strategic Risks as part of the annual and long-term strategic planning processes
• Manage all aspects of financial reporting including the preparation and distribution of monthly and annual financial reports
• Liaise with the Audit & Risk Management Committee on annual audits, emerging risks and financial and legal compliance
• Champion Sustainability as a core objective of the Museum and identify opportunities for improvement in all aspects of sustainability (environment, culture & community, governance & communications, people and finance)
• Provide advice on HR management, policy development and implementation
• Maintain Heide's HR policy and staff employment contracts and oversee their effective implementation 
and revision as required
• Manage Heide’s information technology needs and manage the Museum’s external IT consultants 
Facilities Manager
• Manage and implement service contracts
• Ensure building requirement are met and ensure compliance to Occupational Health and Safety 
standards, essential service and relevant legislation
• Develop and undertake building and maintenance projects on site
• Manage utility’s consumption and implement savings in relation to reduced energy and cost efficiency 
Head Gardener
• Coordinate all aspects of the strategic planning related to the development of Heide’s heritage gardens
• Develop and deliver high quality programming that engages the public with the Heide II Kitchen Garden, 
Heide I Vegetable Garden, the Wild Garden and the Park generally
• As resident Caretaker, be first point of contact for Emergency Services and Security in any after-hours 
emergency situations

Alternative Art Spaces
There is a fee to exhibit in this space but an advantage to the artist is that they are not required to gallery sit while their work is on display. A cafe may also attract more customers who may not usually go to an art gallery but might like to purchase original works of art. Some offices also allow artists to hang work to brighten up the working environment. Another space to show artwork is at an art lending library. Footscray Community Arts centre invites artists to donate works that local members of the community can loan, as they would a book, artwork to display in their home and experience living with art.
Some artists choose to make their artwork freely available to all by painting murals, paste-ups and other arts interventions in the public domain. Melbourne’s laneways have become a tourism attraction for people visiting Melbourne. The City of Melbourne has developed a Graffiti Management Plan to determine which street arti is legitimate and which is undesirable. Citylights is a program supported by the Council to promote ‘good’ street art and capitalise on tourism and the capacity of street art to create a vibrant, colourful and interesting urban environment. Artists keep painting over street art, creating a changing streetscape of images. Codes of ethics apply to artists as to what is acceptable to paint over and what isn’t. In 1984 visiting international artist Keith Haring painted a mural on the side of the Collingwood Technical College which has remained untouched by vandals or street artists. Since the City of Melbourne introduced a permit system for street art, tagging has become a problem for ‘legitimate’ street artists.
Commercial galleries are finding that their customer databases are increasing as people from all over the world have access to their collections and the artists they represent. Gallery Directors provide other information, such as CVs, artist biographies, critical essays and low-res examples of their artists work.
Large museums have ‘virtual galleries’, in their collections have been digitised so visitors and researchers may view artworks online, many in great detail, allowing for close inspection of artworks, that show how how artworks have aged, such as cracks in old paint. Many galleries provide podcasts and vodcasts of exhibitions and related artist interviews and public programs. There is an increasing number of ‘virtual museums’, which encourage viewers to peruse a collection of images and information resources – paintings, drawings, photographs, diagrams, graphs, recordings, video segments, newspaper articles, and transcripts of interviews, numerical databases and a host of other items that together create a new kind of ‘exhibition’ space for a collection.

For the purposes of the VCE Studio Arts Study Design an online gallery must be a curated selection of new media artworks, which can be viewed online.

Roles and processes in the presentation of artworks
Public Gallery Case Study - ACCA
MONA
Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart, Tasmania
MONA, or the Museaum of old and new art
is a private museum owned by David Walsh.
Walsh is a tasmanian who made his fortune
through gambling. The museum is sometimes described as a 'subversive Disneyland' and is a reflection of Walsh's own personal taste. It contains artworks which are both contemporary and historical. The atworks range from large scale video instalation pieces to egyptian releics from 200 bc. The gallery itself is layed out over 3 levels and has been literally blasted out of the cliff face. The interior is a mixture of both an industrial aesthetic and a natural rock finish. The gallery spaces are also sometimes unconventional, and very much designed to house the unusual work within.
The main things you need to know from this presentation:

1) What are the types of galleries and exhibition spaces?
2) How they are funded?
3) What is their aim?
4) How they market themselves?
5) Describe a gallery in detail - including layout and floor plans, owner of the gallery, funding and marketing of that gallery.
6) Give examples of the types of galleries you have visited or know of - include some examples of ari's and online galleries.


SUMMARY
Colville St Gallery - Hobart.

This is an example of a commercial Gallery that you have visited this year. The artist who was showing work at the time was Paul Snell - a Launceston based artist who works mainly in digital prints.

http://www.colvillegallery.com.au
Full transcript