Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

APE book presentation.
by

Kelsi Parmenter

on 4 September 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

Presentation by Kelsi Parmenter Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris There are several times that the main character, David, feels as if he doesn't belong in the certain situation he is in. This feeling started with him at a very young age, and continued to follow him throughout out his life. David has to overcome obstacles that most people don't even think about happening in someones life. A few examples of those obstacles are his speech impairment (he can't pronounce the letter "s" correctly), being homosexual in a time that homosexuality wasn't accepted at all, and living in a country not speaking their language. Central Theme: Feeling like you don't fit into society This feeling of "not fitting in" is a very common theme in society today. Everyone has felt a little out of their element at one point or another in their life. A prime example of this is high school. In high school everything done or said is seen by your peers and instantly judged, or at least it feels that way to the students. The same happens with David, whenever he tries to speak French to people speaking it fluently he feels stupid and like he doesn't belong. How does this relate to society? The two other works that I'm connecting this book to are the play Wicked and the book "Beastly". Connection to other works The play Wicked demonstrates the theme of not fitting in very well. The main character has to overcome a huge setback; she was born with green skin. One can only imagine how hard it would be to try to make friends as a kid looking so different from all of the other children. David goes through the same kind of issue with both his speech and his sexuality. Wicked The book "Beastly" by Alex Flinn is a modern-day spin off of the Disney classic Beauty and the Beast. While the plot is changed, the major themes remain the same which includes not fitting into society. David and "the Beast" both feel as if society doesn't want them and nothing they do will make them fit in like the rest of the world. "Beastly" "Plurals presented a considerable problem, but I worked around them as best I could; 'rivers,' for example, became either 'a river or two' or 'many a river.' Possessives were a similar headache, and it was easier to say nothing then to announce that the left-hand and right-hand glove of Janet had fallen to the floor. After all the compliments I had received about on my improved vocabulary, it seemed prudent to lie low and keep my mouth shut. I didn't want anyone thinking I was trying to be a pet of the teacher" (Sedaris 11-12). Passage that supports the theme: Sedaris' tone on this subject is very apathetic. When describing what he went through just to have a normal conversation he isn't looking for pity or even asking anyone to feel sorry for him, he is just telling the facts. He never says that it was sad for him to have to plan out everything he would say, or that he had to work harder than any of the other kids, he is simply stating what was going through his head and to him it was completely normal. Tone The details that Sedaris provides in this passage greatly helps the reader understand the point he is trying to get across. By including details such as how he got around saying the plural form of words, like rivers, the readers can fully recognize how David tried to hide his speech impairment from society. Details This passage shows a lot about how Sedaris views society. Not only does Sedaris feel that society wouldn't accept someone with something wrong with them, such as a speech impairment, but he also thinks that by David improving his vocabulary the other kids will think he is trying to suck up to the teacher. These two comments about society exemplify a lot about Sedaris as a person. Social Commentary I would recommend this book to and high school kid, girl or boy. The way that Sedaris presents how he sees society is very interesting and eye-opening. Even though there are many controversial topics mentioned, he spins his opinion in an entertaining and informative way that both genders will enjoy. Recommendation
Full transcript