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UNIT 55. Prepositions in Relative Clauses

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by

Ramil Hajiyev

on 25 February 2015

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Transcript of UNIT 55. Prepositions in Relative Clauses

Noun + of which
>
Whose + noun
UNIT 55. Prepositions in Relative Clauses
of which
and
of whose
Where should I put
preposition
with '
WHOSE
' ???
In Formal
Noun + of which

is often preferred to

Whose + noun
when we talk about
things
.
A great deal of obedience, whose implementation can be postponed by youth these days, directs people to the success without gaining experience.
A great deal of obedience, implementation of which can be postponed by youth these days, directs people to the success without gaining experience.
Other possible forms...
A great deal of obedience, implementation of which can be postponed by youth these days, directs people to the success without gaining experience.
A great deal of obedience directs people to the success without gaining experience, implementation of which can be postponed by youth these days
after
all
both
each
many
most
neither
none
part
some
a number (1.2.3)
SUPERLATIVES
of which
of whose
but not usually
which or whose
For instance,
Little girl throws her dolls away, none of which she plays calmly.
The manager fired waiters, most of whose clothes were not tidy.
She listens music in Deutsch and English, both of which she understands easily.
of which > that/which...of
In
formal
contexts,
of which
can be used instead of
that
or
which...of
in relative clauses.
be aware of...
* before whose?
at the end of the clause?
Formal
Less Formal
(more natural)
In formal,
mainly written
, English
Whose
can come
after
a
preposition
in a relative clause.
It is more natural to put the
preposition at the end of

the clause in less formal
contexts and in spoken English.

European Union is in discussion with Russia,
on whose
land was occupied by Armenia.
European Union is in discussion with Russia,
whose
land was occupied by Armenia
on
.
Where should I put
preposition
with '
WHICH
' and '
WHOM
' ???
When a preposition is needed with the relative pronouns
which
and
whom
we usually put it before the relative pronoun in formal style.
The party,
at which
we sang Karaoke, was wonderful in a word.
Whom > Who
That & No relative pronoun with pronouns
The Jeyranbatan reservoir,
in which
spawn is inevitable, is not harmful for drink.
Prep
with
which
and
whom
Qafqaz University co-workers,
among whom
I worked, know how to work collaboratively.
FORMAL
After a preposition we usually use
whom
rather than
who
in formal style.
Parents should pull in children's horn,
to whom
they are accountable.
Prep in Less formal
In less Formal English we usually put the preposition
later
in the relative clause
rather than
at the
beginning
The PM
that
was told
to
us was Silvio Berlusconi.
we prefer
who
or
that
rather than
whom
Two-word verbs in Relative clause
If the verb in the relative clause is a two-word verb, we don't usually put the preposition before the relative pronoun.
come across
fill in
look after

The dangerous river which villagers carry on washing clothes nearby is extremely cold in winter.
Three-word verbs in Relative clause
With three-word verbs, we only put the
preposition before
the relative pronoun in a very formal and literary style and so many people avoid this pattern.
My grandpa is one of a kind
with whom
nobody can get along well.
Thank you all
The academic study that/ which I am proud of is my masterpiece.
use of which there
Full transcript