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A servant two masters - Characters

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Laura Bauckham

on 22 September 2014

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Transcript of A servant two masters - Characters

A servant two masters - Characters
In this presentation I will be talking about each of the nine characters in this play: Pantalone, Beatrice, Truffledino, Smeraldina, Florindo, Silvio, Clarice, Dr Lombardi and Brighella. This will be focused on their stock character, their characteristics, their movement and their relationships.
Pantalone
Beatrice
Truffledino
smeraldina

florindo
silvio
Clarice
Dr Lombardi
Brighella
Brighella is the only character whose stereotype has not been translated to the play. In this play, Brighella can be played in several different ways, all of which are open to interpretation. Most commonly, he's portrayed as the 'jolly, enterprising servant' or something of a Jack Falstaff-esque character.
The other characters have all been taken from the stock characters of commedia dell'arte: He's a masterful liar, and can make up a spur-of-the moment lie for any situation. He is an inveterate schemer, and he is good at what he does. If his plans failed, it was almost always out of luck on behalf of the other characters. When he's a servant, he will either serve his master devotedly or look for every opportunity to ruin and take advantage of him as he happens to see fit—whatever will gain the greatest advantage for himself and himself alone. He is fond of money, but spends it rapidly, and tends to be especially fond of the drink. To quote Duchartre again: "Brighella believes in no one but the hangman, he respects nothing and loves nothing but his own pleasure." In fact, he has few good qualities save for his ability to entertain the audience.

His character is usually from uptown Milano or Bergamo, and in the original Italian would often speak with the local accent. He could be very witty and fond of wordplay. He is also an accomplished singer, dancer and musician, and sometimes would play the guitar on stage.
Servant, usually to Pantalone, but also frequently Il Capitano or Il Dottore. Second zanni if Brighella is in the company. A central figure in Goldoni's Commedia-based plays written in the first half of the eighteenth century. Always carries his batocchio. It is a phallic symbol, but without menace- which is also true of its use as a weapon, usually against Pantalone, though often the tables are turned and it is Arlecchino who finds himself on the receiving end. Never pathetic, always knows: he is never the loser. Never just does something. For example, if, in the heat of the moment, his slapstick gets left on the ground, he somersaults to pick it up again. His paradox is that of having a dull mind in an agile body. (Rudlin, 76-79) In both The Servant of Two Masters and The King Stag, playwrights Goldoni and Gozzi use Truffaldino as their main servant. Though in Servant, Truffaldino has a much more pivotal role in the play by being the central character and cause most of confusion within Goldoni's play.
He is a bachelor or a widower. When he does marry he is immediately cuckolded. Often father to one of the Lovers. From Bologna, home city of Italy's oldest University, not that he ever went to it. Speciallises in everything, and can talk a load of old boloney about it. He is belly, not intellect- centered. Il Dottore is inclined, like Pantalone, to be stingy, but in his case it is because he doesn't have any money. (Rudlin, 99,101) There is not a example of Dottore in Gozzi's The King Stag, but he does play an very important part in Goldoni's The Servant of Two Masters. Il Dottore is the father of Silvio, who is the intended husband of Clarice, Pantalone's daughter.
In The Servant of Two Masters the Lovers are Beatrice and Florindo & Clarice and Silvio, and in The King Stag they are King Deramo and Angela & Leander and Clarissa. In both shows the Loves are uses in their traditional stock devices.
The Lovers (of whom four-two would-be pairs- are usually needed for a full scenario) are called innamorati. High status, but brought low by the hopelessness of their infatuation. Young, attractive. They relate exclusively to themselves- they are in love with themselves being in love. The last person they actually relate to int he course of the action is often the beloved. Characteristics are fidelity, jealousy, and fickleness. They are vain, petulant, spoilt, full of doubt and have very little patience. Their attention span is short like young children's. They are primarily in love with themselves, secondarily in love with love, and only consequentially in love with the beloved.
In The Servant of Two Masters the Lovers are Beatrice and Florindo & Clarice and Silvio, and in The King Stag they are King Deramo and Angela & Leander and Clarissa. In both shows the Loves are uses in their traditional stock devices.
The Lovers (of whom four-two would-be pairs- are usually needed for a full scenario) are called innamorati. High status, but brought low by the hopelessness of their infatuation. Young, attractive. They relate exclusively to themselves- they are in love with themselves being in love. The last person they actually relate to int he course of the action is often the beloved. Characteristics are fidelity, jealousy, and fickleness. They are vain, petulant, spoilt, full of doubt and have very little patience. Their attention span is short like young children's. They are primarily in love with themselves, secondarily in love with love, and only consequentially in love with the beloved.
Florindo has characteristics of both the captain and the lover - stock characters. He inflates and deflates like the lover at moments of high tension and also loves the attention to be on him. He also has macho qualities and he likes to be in control which is more captain-like. So he acts like a tough guy but in reality he's really quite pathetic.
She is Harlequin's mistress, a comic servant playing the tricky slave type. She is dressed in a ragged and patched dress, appropriate to a hired servant. she would wear a motley, similar to her counterpart Truffledino. She was also known to wear heavy makeup around her eyes.
She was often the only functional intellect on the stage. She is often known to be a flirtatious and impudent (disrespectful) character, but without losing her judgment.
Beatrice and Florindo represent an interesting
counterpoint to Silvio and Clarice. They are likewise focused on their relationship, yet they display more depth of character. Goldoni gives both characters larger roles as well as numerous monologues. In these scenes and speeches, both are able to express their depth of feeling for each other, which extends far beyond the love-you/hate-you game playing of Silvio and Clarice. As commedia evolved, new characters developed to meet the changing needs of the form. For female actors who achieved a certain level of respect, it was particularly important to develop characters befitting their reputations. Furthermore, the commedia performances heroic lovers to help anchor the insanity. Beatrice and Florindo’s characters represent more...


Pantaloon - Is a tradesmen, so very keen to make money
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