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Assessment Photo Album

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by

Theresa Carver

on 23 June 2014

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Transcript of Assessment Photo Album

Sixth Grade Reading and Writing Assessment
"The True Story of the Three Little Pigs"
Learning Objectives
What will students be able to do:

* Explore the key idea of two sides of a story

* Will read a parody

* Will identify cause-and-effect relationships

* create their own version of a parody

* evaluate their own version of a parody
Missouri Grade-Level-Expectations
Reading Standards
R.2.A.1.2 Recoginze text features of fiction, poerty, and drama
R.3.C1.6.C Identify and explain cuase and effect
Writing Standards
W.3.A Create narrative and descriptive writing
Learning Goals
What will students learn?

The students will learn:

* That there two sides to every story

* To analyze and read a parody

* To identify a cause-and-effect relationship

* To create their own retelling of "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs"
Theresa Carver
EDUC 6731C-1 Assessment of Student Learning
Assessment Photo Album
Appropriate Assessments

Assessment #1: Prior Knowledge using a K-W-L Graphic Organizer

Assessment #2: Read original version of "The Three Little Pigs" by Bernadette Watts. Then read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" by Jon Scieszka

Assessment #3: Cause-and-effect graphic organizer to show understanding of the two stories

Assessment #4: Guided practice to model text to text connections

Assessment #5: Performance Task: Independent practice for students to show their comprehension of text to text connections will be rewriting ans illustrating their own version of "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs"
Diagnostic and Formative Assessment
Diagnostic Assessments include reading and writing inventory for self-assessment. Independent Reading Inventory, a cloze test, and writing prompt with an attached Rubric. A K-W-L Chart will be used to gain their prior knowledge of the folk tales.



Formative Assessment
As a formative assessment students will complete a quickwrite with teacher writing prompt to answer. A practice and apply assessment of answer literary analysis and reading skills questions throughout the story to gain feedback and misunderstanding of the story concepts. Other types of formative assessments will include thumbs up, thumbs down, ticket-out-the-door, summary question index cards. A chapter selection test will be the final formative assessment for this teaching unit.
Pencil and Paper Assessment
True and False Questions
Complete true or false
1. According to the wolf, what causes people to think of him as big and bad at blowing houses down?
A. True B. False

2. The wolf says that the main problem with the story of three little pigs is that he has not told his side of the story.
A. True B. False
Fill-in-the-blank
Will be used a study guide or a pretest
Short Answer Questions
1. According to the wolf, what caused the first pig's door to fall in?
2. Explain how the pigs in this story are like the pigs in the original story of "The Three Little Pigs".
Pencil-and-Paper Assessment:
Multiple choice question examples.
1. The wolf goes to the third little pig's house because he....
a. is still hungry after eating the first two pigs
b. is angry at the first two little pigs for their rudness
c. still needs a cup of sugar for his cake
d. still has another house to blow down

Essay question:
1. Write about the meaning of taking responsibility for your own actions. Do you think the wolf took responsibility for his actions? Why or Why not?
2. You are the Third Little Pig. Write to tell your side of the story.
Peformance Task:
The True Story of Three Little Pigs book-
Students will complete a book of their own story version and literary elements. Students will create a new version of the story "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" following the original plot closely but present a new perspective and events. Student standards and criteria for success will evaluated by identifying literary elements, characters, details, story events in sequential order. Students will be evaluated using a rubric to assess the students final project, peer editing, and student-teacher conference.
Rubric for the performance task
Story Writing: Retelling of \"The Three Little Pigs\"
________________________________________
Teacher Name: Mrs. Carver


Student Name: ________________________________________
CATEGORY 4 Exceeds
(Yes and …) 3 Meets
(Yes) 2 Improvement
(Yes, but….) 1 Needs Improvement
(Yes, but…)

Organization The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions. The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used. The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear. Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.
Focus on Assigned Topic The entire story is related to the assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic. Most of the story is related to the assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic. Some of the story is related to the assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic. No attempt has been made to relate the story to the assigned topic.
Spelling and Punctuation There are no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. Character and place names that the author invented are spelled consistently throughout. There is one spelling or punctuation error in the final draft. There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft. The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors.
Creativity The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader\\\'s enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader\\\'s enjoyment. The author has used his imagination. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination. There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination.
Illustrations Original illustrations are detailed, attractive, creative and relate to the text on the page. Original illustrations are somewhat detailed, attractive, and relate to the text on the page. Original illustrations relate to the text on the page. Illustrations are not present OR they are not original.
Relates to the Original Story The final draft of the story is readable, clean, neat and attractive. It is free of erasures and crossed-out words. It looks like the author took great pride in it. The final draft of the story is readable, neat and attractive. It may have one or two erasures, but they are not distracting. It looks like the author took some pride in it. The final draft of the story is readable and some of the pages are attractive. It looks like parts of it might have been done in a hurry. The final draft is not neat or attractive. It looks like the student just wanted to get it done and didn\\\'t care what it looked like.
Dialogue There is an appropriate amount of dialogue to bring the characters to life and it is always clear which character is speaking. There is too much dialogue in this story, but it is always clear which character is speaking. There is not quite enough dialogue in this story, but it is always clear which character is speaking. It is not clear which character is speaking.
Relates to Original Stroy All aspects of the story were included. All aspects of the story were somewhat included. All aspects of the story were barley included. No aspects of the story were included.

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