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Greek Fire

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by

Owen Klassen

on 16 January 2015

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Transcript of Greek Fire

petroleum (propane butane), naphtha, burning pitch, sulfur, resin, quicklime and bitumen
IF the fuel can burn on water,
THEN it could potentially be an ingredient
BECAUSE it shares properties with greek fire
Variables:
Geography
Reaction to water
Flammability
Rarity
Extraction
Refinement
Greek Fire
By the Hottest Oven, Owen Klassen
Why I am a Pyromaniac
What I Didn't Know
(and yes, there is such a thing)
What is Fire?
How Should Fire React To Water?
What Is "Negative X"?
How plausible are these Ingredients?
Sulfur
Bitumen
Quicklime
Resin
Burning Pitch
Naphtha
Propane, Butane
What I thought made sense
Variables:
Fuel
Heat
Oxygen
How should fire react to water?
IF we put water on fire
THEN the fire should be put out
BECAUSE...
Variables:
Water
Fire
Fuel
(Oxygen)
What is Fire?
IF
there's enough energy,
THEN
we should get an exothermic reaction
BECAUSE
energy is being released as heat, which could make something catch fire
How should fire react to water?
What is fire?
SIP 1, January 13th (ish)
IF you could find the right fuel,
THEN fire might be able to burn on/in/around water
BECAUSE magic. (I had no better answer at the time)
Variables:
How I make it
Moisture in air
Quality of materials used
What is negative X? (and more to the point, how does it work?)
What the internet told me
What is fire?
"Fire is the rapid oxidization of a material in an exothermic chemical process of combustion"
Oxidation: loss of electrons and increase in oxidation state
Chemical reaction
How should fire react to water?
Class-D fire
Fire burning magnesium, potassium, titanium, and zirconium are aggravated by water
Most accounts say greek fire
came out
on fire. It wasn't ignited or aggravated by water
How does negative X work?
Instant ice pack -> Ammonium Nitrate (NH4CO3
Salt (NaCl) (/Ammonium Cloride (NH4Cl))
Zinc (Zn)
Cl (salt)+ NH4CO3 -> NO2(g) (Nitorgen dioxide) + H2O(aq)
Water breaks down Ammonium Nitrate (NH4CO3) in an autocatalytic effect. Then the melted Ammonium Nitrate oxidizes the zinc
Zn (s) + NH4NO3 (s)-> N2 (g) + ZnO (s) + (H2O) (g)
Zinc burns green
Background information
Theophanes to Kallinikos
Application
Undeniable proof that I didn't make this up
https://www.google.ca/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=UTF-8#q=autocatalytic
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_triangle
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exothermic_process
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combustion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redox
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_fire
http://www.greece.org/romiosini/greek_fire.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquefied_petroleum_gas
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_oxide
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefighting
http://www.unitednuclear.com/negx.htm
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Start-Fire-with-Water/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flame
http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic/redox/oxidnstates.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_(physics)
http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic/redox/oxidnstates.html

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Start-Fire-with-Water/
Experiment
Start video at 1:10
Physics + Chemistry
Full transcript