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Spark Session

A tool for innovative thinking.
by

Anna Parker

on 28 April 2010

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Transcript of Spark Session

At the end of this session we'll have at least 10 phenomenal, innovative ideas that matter to our consumer.

Let's get started. Our collective success hinges on knowing what matters to consumers. There are things that matter right now.
This is what's hot in popular culture; expressed as trends. And then there's what will matter tomorrow. Understanding all three is the core of strategic innovation. Here, we'll show you our thinking. There are some things that matter all the time.
We think of these as Human Truths. Now what? In a world out of control, we control what we can. Demanding transparency.
The next era of hand-holding. We've ushered in the start of a pervasive democracy, in which we want to be involved in every decision, no matter how minor its effect on us.

Take banking. It went from being one of the most trusted sectors (third behind technology and biotechin 2008), to the bottom of the list in only two years.

Expect hyper-local banks and service to crop up and prosper. But we'll soon tire of the responsibility and information overload that accompanies a pervasive democracy.

Which areas of our life will we continue to demand control of, and which will we end up relinquishing?

Could meal planning become completely delegated to your local grocer? In a world out of control,
we control what we can. We've ushered in the start of a pervasive democracy, in which we want to be involved in every decision, no matter how minor its effect on us.

Take banking. It went from being one of the most trusted sectors (third behind technology and biotechin 2008), to the bottom of the list in only two years.

Expect hyper-local banks and service to crop up and prosper. Demanding transparency.
But we'll soon tire of the responsibility and information overload that accompanies a pervasive democracy.

Which areas of our life will we continue to demand control of, and which will we end up relinquishing?

Could meal planning become completely delegated to your local grocer? The next era of hand-holding.
Full transcript