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The Allusion of Cleopatra in Romeo & Juliet

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Destinee Toscano

on 18 March 2014

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Transcript of The Allusion of Cleopatra in Romeo & Juliet

The Allusion of Cleopatra in
Romeo & Juliet

Significance of Allusion
Annotated Bibliography
Katelyn, Simpson. N.p., 29 08 2012. Web. 14 Mar 2014.
Lexie A., . N.p.. Web. 14 Mar 2014.
N.p.. Web. 14 Mar 2014. <http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_104.html>.
Act 2 Scene 4 lines 38-44
Mercutio to Romeo
"Without his roe, like a dried herring: O flesh,
flesh, how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers
that Petrarch flowed in. Laura to his lady was a
kitchen-wench; marry, she had a better love to
be-rhyme her; Dido a dowdy;
Cleopatra
a gipsy;
Helen and Hero hildings and harlots; Thisbe a grey
eye or so, but not to the purpose.
Background Information
Cleopatra
Born around 69 B.C
Queen of Egypt
Married to Mark Anthony
The last ruler of the Macedonian dynasty
Killed herself by forcing a poisonous snake to bite her.
most commonly known for beauty and sexual affairs.
He looks skinny, like a dried herring without its eggs, and he hasn’t got his girl.
O flesh, flesh, you’ve turned pale and weak like a fish. Now he’s ready for
Petrarch’s
Mercutio teases Romeo by alluding to the poet Petrarch and six mythical and historical women who inspired love poetry. Petrarch’s poetry. Compared to Romeo’s girl, Laura was a kitchen slave
.
Surely she has a better love to make rhymes for her.
Dido was shabbily dressed
.
Cleopatra was a gypsy girl
. Helen and Hero were sluts and harlots.
Thisbe might have had a blue eye or two, but that doesn’t matter. Signor Romeo, bonjour. There’s a French greeting that matches your drooping French-style pants. You faked us out pretty good last night.
Translated into Modern English
They thought Romeo left early to "be with Juliet"
[
You faked us out pretty good last night
]
They compare Romeo to someone who can make poems and songs about her better than he does for Juliet.
[
Compared to Romeo’s girl, Laura was a kitchen slave. Surely she has a better love to make rhymes for her.
]
They use Cleopatra as an example of a harlot.
They also use Cleopatra to show Romeos' desperation for love.
Cleopatra is also used as a comparison to Rosaline.
By: Destinee Toscano, Laura Lomeli, Kelsie Solorzano, Hugo Vargas
English 9, Period 7
Parker
Full transcript