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Understanding homophones

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on 10 December 2015

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Transcript of Understanding homophones

Understanding homophones and apostrophes (for omission and possession)
Understanding there, they're and their
Their means ‘belonging to them’:
I went round to
their
house to watch the X factor.
I think
their
house is haunted.

They’re is used instead of ‘they are’:
They’re
going to the Stoke game.
I think
they’re
lovely dogs.

There is used when making a statement
:
There
are eleven players on a football team.
Or when writing about place:
Put the shopping bag down
there
.

practice and practise
Find the error
Homophones in sentences
1. The teacher told them to leave........................... books on the desk.
2. I’m always............................. on time.
3. ................................ going to the Stoke match at three.
4. I would love................................... go to the gym tomorrow.
5. There are.............................. of us going on the School trip.
6. Bill arrived late................................. .
7. I went to Netball ............................. and really enjoyed it.
8. I got to............................. playing the piano last night.
9. The car didn’t move, it was .............................
10. I purchased some ................................... for my pencil case.


The word ‘practice’ is a noun, it refers to an act itself, not who is doing it. On the other hand, ‘practise’ is a verb meaning 'do something repeatedly to improve one skill'.

To summarise, practise is a verb (doing word) and practice a noun (thing).
Practice (the noun)
The doctor hopes to build up a good practice.
What a hard theory to put into practice.
Are you coming to football practice this evening?

Practise (the verb)
She practises the violin every day.
I need to practise my English.
They are practising for the Olympic Games.
 

Find the error and
re-write it correctly
Understanding apostrophes for omission and possession
Apostrophes for possession
Apostrophes can be used to show ownership or belonging.
*Add ’s to a singular noun to make it a possessive noun.
e.g. I like Kate’s shoes.
I want Mrs Farr’s coat.

Add just the apostrophe to the end of plural nouns that end in –s.
e.g.
These are my sisters’ dolls.
(The dolls belong to my sisters)

They are my friends’ pencils.
(The pencils belong to my friends)

If the word is a plural, e.g. Children, women, the apostrophe comes before the ‘s’
e.g.
The children’s playground was closed.
e.g.
The women’s room was full.

You can use the apostrophe after the ‘s’ or, include an apostrophe and additional ‘s’ if the word
already ends in ‘s’.
Miss Billings’s bag is gorgeous. OR Miss Billings’ bag is gorgeous.


Apostrophes for contraction/omission
E.g. Does not– doesn’t
Are not– aren't

What are the contracted forms (omissions) of these words?
Do not
They will
Have not
I am
Would not

An apostrophe for omission/contraction is used to show that letters are missing when two words have been put together.
Apostrophes for contraction/omission

What are the contracted forms (omissions) of these words?
do not
they will
have not
I am
would not
What are the contracted forms (omissions) of these words? do not - don't
they will - they'll
have not - haven't
I am - I'm
would not - wouldn't
1. The teacher told them to leave THEIR books on the desk.
2. I’m always THERE on time.
3. THEY'RE going to the Stoke match at three.
4. I would love go TO the gym tomorrow.
5. There are TWO of us going on the School trip.
6. Bill arrived late TOO .
7. I went to Netball PRACTICE and really enjoyed it.
8. I got to PRACTISE playing the piano last night.
9. The car didn’t move, it was STATIONARY
10. I purchased some STATIONERY for my pencil case.
Homophone answers
Full transcript