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LIKE, totally.

According to the Chicago Manual of Style, "LIKE" is "probably the least understood preposition."
by

Melissa Rose Johnson

on 16 September 2013

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Transcript of LIKE, totally.

Like
Today's use:
Traditional Function:
-as adjectival, not adverbial, so that 'like' is governed by a noun or a noun phrase
Increasingly (but loosely) today in ordinary speech, 'like' displaces as or as if as a conjunction to connect clauses
Teens often see themselves as
star-crossed lovers
like
Romeo and Juliet
-as a preposition,'like' is followed by a noun or pronoun in the objective case
the person in that old portrait looks
like
me
it happened just
like
I said it would happen
should read as
it happened
just as
I said it would happen
you're looking around
like
you've misplaced something
EX 1
Ex 2
should read as
you're looking around
as if
you've misplaced something
Because
as
and
as if
are conjunctions, they are followed by nouns in the nominative case
Do you work too hard,
as I
do?

Although
like
as a conjunction has been considered nonstandard since the 17th century,
today it is common
in dialectal and colloquial usage
He ran
like
he was really scared
Consider
context
and
tone

when deciding whether to impose standard English,


as in the previous examples.


Use and misuse of

"like"
(As defined by the Chicago Manual of Style)
16th Edition
Pg 250
Section 5.181
{ In conclusion...}
Traditional
Modern
or
???
Full transcript