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Contributions of Rani Lakshmi Bai

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Jaygovindhan N

on 10 July 2013

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Transcript of Contributions of Rani Lakshmi Bai

Contributions Of Rani Lakshmi Bhai In India's Freedom Struggle In The 'Revolt Of 1857'
Introduction of revolt in 1857
On May 10, 1857 the Indian Rebellion started in Meerut. This began after rumours that the new bullet casings for the Lee Enfield rifles were coated with pork and beef fat; British commanders insisted on their use and started to discipline anyone who disobeyed. During this rebellion sepoys killed many British soldiers and officers of the East India Company. Unrest began to spread throughout India. During this chaotic time, the British were forced to focus their attentions elsewhere, and Lakshmi Bhai was essentially left to rule Jhansi alone.

Rani Lakshmi Bai's Life
Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi was born on 19 november, 1828in the holy town of Varanasi into a Brahmin family. She was named Manikarnika and was nicknamed Manu. Her father was Moropant Tambe and her mother Bhagirathi Bai. Her parents came from Maharashtra. Her mother died when she was four. Her father worked for a court Peshwa of Bithoor district who brought Manikarnika up like his own daughter. The Peshwa called her "Chhabili", which means "playful". She was educated at home. She was more independent in her childhood than others of her age; her studies included archery, horsemanship, and self-defence. the queen of the Maratha-ruled princely state of Jhansi, situated in the north-central part of India. She was one of the leading figures of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and for Indian nationalists a symbol of resistance to the rule of the British East India Company in the subcontinent.
During this time, she was able to lead her troops swiftly and efficiently to quell skirmishes breaking out in Jhansi. Through this leadership Lakshmi Bai was able to keep Jhansi relatively calm and peaceful in the midst of the Empire's unrest. For example, she conducted the haldi-kumkum ceremony with great pomp and ceremony before all the women of Jhansi to provide assurance to her subjects and to convince them that Jhansi was under no threat of an attack. Up to this point, she had been hesitant to rebel against the British, and there is still some controversy over her role in the massacre of the British HEIC officials and their wives and children on the 8th June 1857 at Jokhan Bagh. Her hesitation finally ended when British troops arrived under Sir Hugh Rose and laid siege to Jhansi on 23 March 1858. She rallied her troops around her and fought fiercely. An army of 20,000, headed by the rebel leader Tatya Tope, was sent to relieve Jhansi and to take Lakshmi Bai to freedom.
Her father, Moropant Tambey, was captured and hanged a few days after the fall of Jhansi. Her adopted son, Damodar Rao (formerly known as Anand Rao), fled with his mother's aides. Rao was later given a pension by the British Raj and cared for, although he never received his inheritance. Damodar Rao settled down in the city of Indore (Madhya Pradesh). He spent most of his life trying convincing the British to restore some of his rights. He and his descendants took on the last name Jhansi wale. He died on May 28, 1906, at the age of 58.
During The Time Of Revolt
However, on the 17th of June 1858, while battling in full warrior regalia against the 8th King's Royal Irish Hussars in Kotah-ki Serai near the Phool Bagh area of Gwalior, she died in the battle of Kalpi when a British officer assasinated her. It was her last wish that British men should not touch her while dying. So she was carried to a nearby small hut where her body was burnt. Her tomb still remains there. . The British captured Gwalior three days later. In the British report of the battle, General Hugh Rose commented that the Rani, "remarkable for her beauty, cleverness and perseverance", had been "the most dangerous of all the rebel leaders". However, the lack of a corpse to be convincingly identified as that of Lakshmi bhai convinced Captain Rheese that she had not actually perished in the battle for Gwalior, stating publicly that:"the Queen of Jhansi is alive!".It is believed her funeral was arranged on the same day near the spot where she was wounded.
Rani was memorialized in bronze statues at both Jhansi and Gwalior, both of which portray her on horseback.

Sources
1.) http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_did_Rani_Lakshmi_Bai_contribute_in_1857_revolt_to_India

2.) http://www.iloveindia.com/indian-heroes/rani-laxmibai.html

3.) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rani_Lakshmibai‎

4.) simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rani_Lakshmibai‎

5.) www.indolink.com/kidz/laxmiBai.html‎

6.) www.youtube.com/channel/HCAkKf8A42N7k‎
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