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THINK DIFFERENTLY

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Joseph Thomas

on 22 January 2014

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Transcript of THINK DIFFERENTLY

1. "THINK DIFFERENTLY"
2. Blue Ocean Strategy -intro
DEMAND IS CREATED
In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profit and rapid.

Analysis of the most appropriate factor explaining the success is the strategic move - the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market creating business offering.

The key is making the right strategic moves ... a product of strategy ... a product of managerial action.
NEW RULES
Never use competition as a benchmark
create a leap in value for both buyer and company itself. = Value Innovation
pursues differentiation and low cost simultaneously

MANAGING UP - RAVING FAN -
4 P'S FROM THE 1960'S
PRODUCT TO EXPERIENCE
PLACE TO EVERYPLACE
PRICE TO EXCHANGE
PROMOTION TO EVANGELISM
Four Action Framework
Conclusion
H. SIMON
Nobel Prize 1978
BOUNDED RATIONALITY
DSS - Decision Support System
Harvard Business Review 2004
BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY
How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant
by W. Chan Kim and Renee' Mauborgne

The characters of a Blue Ocean are:
1. Creates new market space
2. Negates the competitors
3. Aims for the untapped market space
4. Differentiated products
(Through innovation)
Not by competing in overcrowded industries.
Conclusions
The Intelligence Community is not normally self-reflective and usually avoids deep selfexamination,
but recognition and acceptance of the seriousness of its problems by all levels
of the community is a necessary prerequisite for true change, including significant
modifications to current organizational cultures and ethos. Agreemen t on the basic diagnosis
must, therefore, precede detailed propositions about effective remedies. I suggest that the
following six premises, first articulated in the “Analytic Pathologies” briefing, summarize the
most important conclusions to be drawn from the preceding discussion of the current
enfeebled state of the Intelligence Community.
1. The dysfunctional practices and processes that have evolved within the culture of
intelligence analysis go well beyond the classic impediments highlighted by Richards
Heuer in The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis.16 A more effective analytic paradigm
must be built that incorporates the best analytic methods from modern cognitive science and
employs useful and easily usable supporting tools to overcome these impediments and
prevent them from combining into systemic pathologies.
13 “Evidenced-based” analysis is essentially inductive; “hypothesis-based” is deductive; they should be
seen as complementary approaches, not competitors for ownership of the analytic process.
14 For an exception, see John Bodnar, Warning Analysis for the Information Age: Rethinking the
Intelligence Process. In fact, both the Joint Military Intelligence College (JMIC) and the Center for th

AVOID GROUPTHINK
AVOID BAD DECISIONS
READ - THINK - PRAY
INNOVATION
BARRIERS TO IMITATION
Cirque, du Soleil, Home Depo, Federal Express, Southwest Airlines, and CNN
THE FIRST FOLLOWER IS A LEADER
AVOID --- GROUPTHINK
1. Self appointed mindguards
2. Illusion of unanimity
3. Self-censorship
4. Direct pressure on dissenters
5. Stereotyped views of the out group
6.Belief in inherent morality
7. Collective rationalization
8. Illusion of invulnerability
Irving Janis 1972
2. More corrosively, the individual impediments form interrelated, tightly-linked,
amplifying networks that result in extremely dysfunctional analytic pathologies and
pervasive failure. A thorough reconceptualization of the overall analysis process itself is
needed. The new approach would incorporate a better connected, more interactive, and
more collaborative series of networks of intelligence producers and users. In addition, it must
be designed to detect and correct errors within routine procedures, instead of leaving them
to be found by post-dissemination review.
3. The new problems and circumstances call for fundamentally different approaches
in both collection and analysis, as well as in the processing and dissemination
practices and procedures that support them. It is clear that serious problems in the
existing organizational structure of the Intelligence Community are reflected in poor
prioritization, direction, and coordination of critical collection and analysis activities.
However, many problems that are more fundamental and deep-seated exist inside the
organizational “boxes” and within the component elements of the intelligence agencies
themselves. Fixing these—dysfunctional processes, ineffective methods, and ingrained
cultures—is not solely a matter of increased authorities, tighter budgetary control, or better
management. A strategic vision that addresses the systemic pathologies, leadership that
understands how key functions ought to be improved, and a sustained long-term
commitment to rebuilding professional expertise and ethos will be essential.
4. Accurate diagnosis of the root causes of problems “inside the boxes” is required;
otherwise remedies will be merely “band-aids.” For example, the analytic problems occur

The Paradox of Strategy

DATA:
RED - 86% line extensions
62% total revenue / 39% profit
BLUE - 14% new market
38% total Revenue / 61% profits

Study of 150 Blue Ocean creations in over 30 industries
Cirque example of best of both circus and theater with duced costs !
A rejection of the trade off between low cost and differentiation requires a fundamental shift in the mind set and corporate culture.
Large volume low price intimidates would be imitators to compete with the Walmarts

Cognitive barriers

Conscious vs unconscious strategy and execution

3 in one
The value, profit and people proposition have to be aligned by reconstructing the industry and economic environment to pursue differentiation and low cost!
PERCEPTION
IS
REALITY
Sailors use to only seeing great ships move under wind power were very fearful when icebergs due to the current was moving in the opposite direction.
Cognitive Bias
Re framing THE DATA OR SITUATION MAY help overcome a known cognitive bias .
Cognitive Dissonance
- the presence of incongruent relations among cognitions [thoughts & understanding] the frequently results in excessive mental stress and discomfort.
- or if they perform and contradictory action or reaction.

The media can create this with 2 contradictory messages and the individual more likely will chose that which causes less mental stress although the information is not correct and is not the best choice for the person.
- a pattern of deviation in judgement, whereby inferences about other people and situations may be drawn in an illogical fashion. A subjective social reality is created from their perception of not the objective input.
Patient Safety
Communicate this as a constant principle not a priority

Communicate concern: verbal & non verbal


Patient Satisfaction
Engage the person

Empathizing with their concern

Educate using clear concise language and checking for understanding

Enlist the patient as a partner and focus of the care
The Wind vs The Current
What is Said vs The Corporate Culture
Cognitive Bias
Culture
Communication
Expectations
Meet or exceed


The key questions Tipping Point Leaders should answer are: What factors or acts exercise a disproportionately positive influence on breaking the status quo, on getting the maximum bang out of each buck of resources, on motivating employees to aggressively move forward with change, and on knocking down political roadblocks that often trip up even the best strategies?

By focusing on points of disproportionate influence, tipping point leaders are able to break the performance/cost trade-off and topple the four hurdles that block a leap in performance fast and at low cost.

The four hurdles are:
1. the cognitive hurdle that blinds employees from seeing that radical change is necessary;
2. the resource hurdle that is endemic in firms today;
3. the motivational hurdle that discourages and demoralizes staff; and
4. the political hurdle of internal and external resistance to change.

Fair Process: Managing in the Knowledge Economy
Unlike the traditional factors of production–land, labor, and capital–knowledge is a resource that can’t be forced out of people. But creating and sharing knowledge is essential to fostering innovation, and it is the key challenge of the knowledge-based economy.
To create a climate in which employees volunteer their creativity and expertise, managers need to look beyond the traditional tools at their disposal.




They need to build trust. The authors studied the links among trust, idea sharing, and corporate performance for more than a decade. They explored why managers of local subsidiaries so often fail to share information with executives at headquarters, and they studied the dynamics of idea sharing in product development teams, joint ventures, supplier partnerships, and corporate transformations. They offer an explanation for why people resist change even when it would benefit them directly. In every case, the decisive factor is what the authors call fair process–fairness in the way that a company makes and executes decisions. The elements of fair process are simple: Engage people in decisions that directly affect them, explain why decisions are made the way they are, and clarify what will be expected of them after the changes are made.

The dysfunctional practices and processes that have evolved within the culture of intelligence analysis go well beyond the classic impediments highlighted by Richards Heuer in The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis.16 A more effective analytic paradigm must be built that incorporates the best analytic methods from modern cognitive science and employs useful and easily usable supporting tools to overcome these impediments and prevent them from combining into systemic pathologies.

LEADERSHIP
How can you lead with your hands tied? How can you generate a leap in performance when everything seems stacked against you? Think limited resources, a demoralized staff, politics, and an organization wedded to the status quo. The answer rests in applying what we call Tipping Point Leadership.

The theory of tipping points, which has its roots in epidemiology, hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can happen quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Key to unlocking an epidemic movement is concentration, not diffusion.

Tipping point leadership builds on the reality that in any organization there are factors that exercise a disproportionate influence on performance.
TIPPING POINT
Hence, contrary to conventional wisdom, meeting a massive challenge is not about putting forth an equally massive response where gains in performance are achieved by proportional investments in time and resources.
Rather it is about conserving resources and cutting time by focusing on identifying and then leveraging the factors of disproportionate influence in an organization.
WIND - WHAT WE SAY
CURRENT - = CULTURE
Six Principles of BOS
The Six Principles of
Blue Ocean Strategy
Formulation principles Risk factor each principle attenuates
Reconstruct market boundaries
↓ Search risk
Focus on the big picture, not the numbers

↓ Planning risk
Reach beyond existing demand

↓ Scale risk
Get the strategic sequence right

↓ Business model risk
Execution principles Risk factor each principle attenuates
Overcome key organizational hurdles
↓ Organizational risk
Build execution into strategy
↓ Management risk

SAFER SURGEY:
CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Evidence-based Findings and ROI

On average, Safer Healthcare's Crew Resource Management programs pay for themselves within 8-10 months. Our integrated Lean Crew Resource Management in healthcare programs and risk mitigation services have helped clients increase productivity and profitability.

Below are some of the results realized:
•78% reduction of surgical counts errors
•99% reduction of wrong site surgeries
•83% increase in employee satisfaction and patient safety awareness
•67% decrease in surgical infections
•48% decrease in waste of disposable goods in the operating room
•89% reduction in nursing turnover
•63% increase in operating room turnaround times
You can not solve a problem with the same thinking that created the problem. A. Einstein
CAN YOU FIND THE PATTERN FOR SUCCESS
RECONSTRUCT
DIFFERENTIATION
LOW COST
&
ALIGNMENT
-VALUE
-PEOPLE
-PROFIT


1. Better before cheaper—in other words, compete on differentiators other than price.

2. Revenue before cost—that is, prioritize increasing revenue over reducing costs.

3. There are no other rules—so change anything you must to follow Rules 1 and 2.

1. Better before cheaper—in other words, compete on differentiators other than price.
2. Revenue before cost—that is, prioritize increasing revenue over reducing costs.
3. There are no other rules—so change anything you must to follow Rules 1 and 2.
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