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Lang/Lit: Making Connections

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Paul Hanson

on 15 May 2017

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Transcript of Lang/Lit: Making Connections

Lang/Lit: Making Connections (Coursework)
Overview
This task requires that you:
engage in independent study
compare literary and non-literary texts
focus on a shared theme or linguistic of literary feature such as:
phonetics, phonology and prosodics
lexis and semantics
grammar, including morphology
pragmatics
discourse.
Exemplar Titles
A comparison of openings in a novel and an autobiography.
An exploration of real and fictional events.
Representations of particular themes in literary and non-literary sources.
What is a character? An exploration of the idea of character in literature and in other texts.
How does storytelling work in different modes?
An exploration of the use of non-literary genres within literary texts.
An exploration of speech features in literature and in real-world communication.
An exploration of new language in literature and non-literary contexts.
Your Submission
The investigation must be between 2,500-3,000 words in length.

The breakdown:
aims and introduction (750 words)
review (300-500 words)
analysis (1,250 words)
conclusions (200-500)
appendix (not included in word count)
references (not included in word count)

Aims and Introduction
This section needs to demonstrate:
the focus and aim of your research
justification of your choice of literary and non-literary texts
that you have read the texts fully
Research
In this section you need to show that you have:
read secondary sources:
understood the ideas and theories
Analysis
This is the main section and it needs to:
analyse both texts, either separately or together
have subsections for the different language analysis highlighted in the 'aims and introduction'
be well-written
Conclusions
The final section must:
summarise your key points of what you have uncovered
show how analysing each text has helped you understand the other
Appendix and References
Appendix: extracts and any data.
List of sources used in the research, using the Harvard System
Recap
The investigation must be between 2,500-3,000 words in length.

The breakdown:
aims and introduction (750 words)
review (300-500 words)
analysis (1,250 words)
conclusions (200-500)
appendix (not included in word count)
references (not included in word count)
Assessment Objectives
AO1: Apply concepts and methods from integrated linguistic and literary study as appropriate, using associated terminology and coherent written expression. (15 marks max.)
AO2: Analyse ways in which meanings are shaped in texts. (15 marks max.)
AO3: Demonstrate understanding of the significance and influence of the contexts in which texts are produced and received. (10 marks max.)
AO4: Explore connections across texts, informed by linguistic and literary concepts and methods. (10 marks max.)
AO1
For a Band 5 top mark of 15 you must:
offer a thorough and perceptive account of source material
use relevant methodology productively
guide their readers through the writing

What does this mean?
show you know the texts really well
use terminology, theory and research
write clearly and with good organisation

AO2

For a Band 5 top mark of 15 you must:
produce a thorough, open-minded and perceptive analysis
recognise that meanings are not fixed, but negotiated
cover both sources well

What does this mean?
try to analyse really perceptively, deeply
show how meaning is arrived at
write the same amount for both sources
AO3
For a Band 5 top mark of 10 you must:
show perceptive understanding of the relationship between texts and their contexts
cover different dimensions of context as appropriate, for example:
time
place
ideology
mode
genre
purpose
audience
AO4
For a Band 5 top mark of 10 you must:
write perceptively about how the study of each of their chosen texts has illuminated the other
conclude their study by critiquing and reflecting on the rationale for their comparison

What does this mean?
write sections that show similarities (e.g. word choice, use of rhetoric, ideas...)
write a conclusion that summarises what you've learned and/or how your thesis has been proven
Your Interests
Which literary genres do you enjoy the most?
Which concepts have interested you?
Which non-literary texts interested you in the Paris anthology?
What kinds of experiences do you personally have of language use that might offer ideas for non-literary material?
Focus
You can investigate:
either a theme
or specific linguistic strategies

Which interests you the most?

Let's generate some ideas and draw up a shortlist.
Selecting Your Literary Text
You need to select a literary text that you have read entirely and one that really engages you because you are going to spend a long time with it.

Which texts spring to mind right now?

It can be a text you haven't read but really want to.

If there's a particular theme or genre you're interested in, how might you begin researching possible texts?
Mapping Out Ideas: Themes
Dystopic futures
Practice
Let's go through this process together.

Title: A comparison of the way reality TV is represented in written texts.

Extract from 'A Moment of War' by Laurie Lee
'Rumble in the Jungle' by Charlie Brooker
The Handmaid's Tale
Religious fundamentalism
Fertility
Chauvinsim and feminism
Female friendship
The importance of language
Mapping Out Ideas: Themes
Idea One
Your Chosen Text
Idea Two
Idea Three
Idea Four
Idea Six
Idea Five
Mapping Out Ideas: Literary Features
Characterisation/point of view: unnamed narrator/ first person restricted.
The Handmaid's Tale
Events: going to the Commander's house, the ceremony, the Salvaging, the birth, her 'escape'.
Structure: mainly chronological, with analepsis.
Space and place: the Red Centre, the Commaner's house, the garden, the room, Jezebel's, the Wall.
Mapping Out Ideas: Linguistic Devices
Speech and thought
The Handmaid's Tale
Figurative
Lexical
Rhetorical
Allusions
Mapping Out Ideas: Literary Features
Characterisation/viewpoint
Your Chosen Text
Events
Structure
Space and place
Mapping Out Ideas
Idea One
Your Chosen Text
Idea Two
Idea Three
Idea Four
Idea Six
Idea Five
Mapping Out Ideas: Themes
Dystopic futures
The Handmaid's Tale
Religious fundamentalism
Fertility
Chauvinsim and feminism
Female friendship
The importance of language
Mapping Out Ideas: Literary Features
Characterisation/point of view: unnamed narrator/ first person restricted.
The Handmaid's Tale
Events: going to the Commander's house, the ceremony, the Salvaging, the birth, her 'escape'.
Structure: mainly chronological, with analepsis.
Space and place: the Red Centre, the Commaner's house, the garden, the room, Jezebel's, the Wall.
Mapping Out Ideas: Linguistic Devices
Speech and thought
The Handmaid's Tale
Figurative
Lexical
Rhetorical
Allusions
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