Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Writing Research Questions

Explains types of questions & what an essential question looks like for research
by

C Morton

on 13 February 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Writing Research Questions

Writing Research Questions
Who, What, When, & Where questions can usually be answered with short answers & are not considered research questions. They help with gathering background information and supporting details.
Basic Short Answer Questions
JOURNAL ENTRY #2: For your chosen research topic, write a question for each type of these questions.

Who _________________?
What _______________?
When __________________?
Where ________________?
EXAMPLES:
What is the Moog Synthesizer?
When & where was it developed?
Who uses it?
When is it used?
Examples: Why was the Moog Synthesizer such a huge success from the very beginning?
Why did some musicians refuse to accept this technology?
From where did Moog get his ideas for the development of the synthesizer?
RESEARCH questions deal with the HOW and WHY of topics:
-BIG IDEAS
-CHANGES OVER TIME
-DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW
-ETHICAL ISSUES
-EXPERIMENTS to support a research question
Think about:
1- Places important to your topic
2- Things or artifacts important to your topic
3- People important to your topic
4- Events important to your topic
What do you know about your topic?
Get to know your topic. Brainstorm what you already know about it. Keep these in mind:
1- Are monarch butterfly populations increasing or decreasing, and what affect is this having on the environment?
2- Does the brand of drums used by a percussionist impact their performance? Why are some brands considered better than others?
What a good
research question
could look like:
Examples:
Who was most influential in ending
the Great Depression and why?

What points of view were held
by the Egyptian people regarding
King Tut after his death?
If you use "who" or "what"
questions, you must
combine them
with other thinking skills.

Examples:
Why are some people concerned with animal rights?

What impact did the available transportation options have on families who lived during the lifetime of Laura Ingalls Wilder?

JOURNAL: Write one "HOW" question and one "WHY" question for your topic in your journal.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS are the big picture, big idea, or main idea questions. They are often considered "open-ended" and take longer to answer than other questions.
Now create a KWL chart like the one below on the next empty page of your journal.
Next time we will continue!
Full transcript