Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Human Body

No description
by

Kimberly Holiday

on 12 November 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Human Body

The Human Body
Skeletal
sources:
Bones
Tendons & Ligaments
Long Bone

Short Bone
Flat Bone
Irregular
long bones are longer than they are wide • muscles use long bone like levers to move the limbs
short bones nearly equal in length and width • enable movement in multiple directions
protect soft organs • provide broad surface for muscle attachment
elaborate shapes that do not allow these bones to fit into other catagories
Metacarpals

Phalanges

Radius
Ulna
(forearm)
(fingers)
Humerus
(upper arm)
Metatarsals

Phalanges

(foots)
(leg)
(thigh)
Tibia
Fibula
Femur
Carpal Bones
Tarsal Bones

(hip bone)
Ribs

(shoulder blade)
Scapula
Os Coxae
Cranial Bones
Vertabrae
Coccyx
Ball and Socket
Pivot
Hinge
Saddle
Gliding
Conyloid
Joints
Fibrous
Cartilaginous
Synovial
Adjacent bones bound by collagen fibers extending from the matrix of one into the matrix of the other
Adjacent bones bound by cartilage
Adjacent bones covered with hyaline articular cartilage separated by lubricating synovial fluid and enclosed in a fiberous joint capsule
(Synovial Joint) • hemispherical head of one joint fits into a cuplike depression of another
Examples: shoulder and hip joints
(Synovial Joint) • oval convex surface of one bone
articulates with an elliptical depression of another
Examples: radiocarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints
(Synovial Joint) • slightly concave or convex bone surfaces that slide across each other
Examples: intercarpal, intertarsal, sternoclavicular joints; joints between the articular processes of the vertebrae
Cartilage
a connective tissue with a rubbery matrix, cells contained in lacunae and has no blood vessles
covers the articular srufaces of many bones
supports organs such as the ear and larynx
(Synovial Joint) • one bone has a convex surface that fits into a concave depression of the other • Like a door hinge, only moves in one plane
Examples: elbow, knee, interphalangeal (finger and toe) joints
(Synovial Joint) • One bone has a projection that fits into a ringlike ligament of another • Allows the bones to rotate one top of one another
Examples: top 3 vertebrae in the spine and the radioulnar joint in the elbow
(Synovial Joint) • Both bones are concave on one side and convex on the other • Allows for movement in two directions
The only saddle joint is the trapeziometacarpal which is located at the base of the thumb
Bone to Bone
Muscle to Bone
Willis McGahee
Example of a Tendon
(muscle to bone)
Example of a Ligament
(bone to bone)
Cardiovascular
Heart
Blood Vessels
If Valentine's Day cards were anatomically correct...
Pulmonary Veins
Superior vena cava
Inferior
vena cava
oygen poor blood returns to the heart from the upper body
Oxygen poor blood returns to the heart from the lower body
Collects oxygen poor blood from the supieror and inferior then forces it to the right ventricle
controls blood flow between the right atrium and right ventricle.
Collects oxygen poor blood from right atrium and forces it through the pulminary valve.
controls blood flow between right ventricle and pulmonary arteries.
carries blood from the heart to the lungs where it will be oxygenated
carries oxygen-rich blood from the lungs back to the heart
collects oxygen rich blood and forces it through the mitral valve
controls blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle.
(LARGEST AND STRONGEST) chamber in the heart
pushes blood out through the aortic valve and into the body
controls blood flow from the left ventricle to the aorta
LARGEST ARTERY
carries oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle to the rest of the body
Arteries
Veins
Capillaries
Carry oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body
Carry oxygen deficient blood from the body back to the heart
Deliver oxygenated blood to the body tissue
Blood
Plasma
Red Blood Cells
White Blood Cells
Platelets
(Erythrocytes)
Pick up oxygen from the lungs and deliver it to the body
Pick up carbon dioxide from others cells and unload it in the lungs
(Leukocytes)
a clear extracellular fluid that makes up the liquid in the blood
Aid in the immune system
Defend the body from pathogens and cancer cells
Platelets are not cells but small fragments of megakaryocute cytoplasm
Major functions:
promote blood clotting
dissolved old blood clots
Respiratory
When tendons and ligaments are ruptured, they no longer hold the joint together properly and it is free to bend in unnatural ways. Willis McGahee suffered a knee injury while playing football in college, tearing his anterior and posterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments. He made a full recovery from the disturbing event.
Respiration has three meaings:
1. ventilation of the lungs (breathing)
2. the echange of gases between air and blood and between blood and tissue fluid
3. the use of oxygen in celluar metabloism
TheNose
The Pharynx
The Laryx
Upper Respiratory Tract
Lower Respiratory Tract
The Trachea & Bronchial Tree
The Lungs
Warms, cleanses, and humidifies inhaled air
Senses odors and tastes
Serves as a resonating chamber to amplify the voice
Basic Functions:
Basic Functions:
Also known as the "Windpipe"
Rigid tube about 4.5. in. long and 1 in wide
Supported by 16-20 C-shaped rings of cartilage that reinforce the trachea and keep it from collapsing when you inhale.
Nasopharynx (passage for air)
Oropharynx (passage for air, food, & drink)
Laryngopharynx (passage for air, food, & drink)
Inhaled air turns 90* downward, filtering large dust particles that cannot make the turn
Space between the soft palate and the root of the tongue
The bottom end of the Pharynx between the esophagus and the Oropharynx
Animal Style...
Keeps food and drink out of the airway (the epiglottis and the glottis seal to block the windpipe)
Producing sound
Epiglottis
Glottis
A forest of Bronchial Trees
ha ha
hah
cause trees
Primary Bronchi
Secondary Bronchi
Tertiary Bronchi
a highly branched system of air tubes extending from the primary bronchus to about 65 thousand terinal bronchioles
Lobular Bronchiole
Terminal Bronchioles
Respiratory Bronchioles
Alveolar Duct
Alveolar Sacs
Alveoli
• In frogs and other amphibians, the lung is a simple sac lined with blood vessels (like 1 alveoli). This is sufficient to meet their oxygen need. Humans, however, need a more complex lung. Rather than having 1 sac, human lungs are spongy masses composed of 150 million little sacs.
• Tiny blood vessels called capillaries wrap around the alveoli and exchange carbon dioxide for oxygen
Right Lung
Left Lung
Superior
Lobe
Superior
Lobe
Inferior
Lobe
Inferior
Lobe
Middle
Lobe
• a somewhat conical organ witha broad, concave base resting on the diaphragm and a blunt peak called the apex.
Digesetive
1.
4.
2.
3.

• processes food
• extracts nutrients from it
• eliminates the residue

Ingestion
The selective intake of food
Digestion
The mechanical and chemical breakdown of food into a form the body can use
Absorption
Uptake of nutrients into the epithelial cells of the digestive tract and then into the blood or lymph
Defacation
The elimination of undigested residue
through a four step process...
The digestive system
The Mouth through the Esophagus
The Stomach
The Liver, Gallbladder, and Pancreas
Chemical Digestion and Absorption
The Small Intestine
The Large Intestine

(Scuba Land)
The functions of the mouth, or oral cavity, include ingestion, taste, mastication (chewing), the beginning of chemical digestion, deglutition (swallowing).
The esophagus is a muscular tube that moves swallowed food down to the stomach.
Full transcript