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David Hume

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by

Roberto Baltieri

on 28 February 2014

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Transcript of David Hume

DAVID
H U M E

Hume's
fork

What about a lecture at the University of
Oxford
?

relations of ideas
mathematical & logical knowledge
matters of fact
knowledge acquired through experience or experiment
Hume divides knowledge into two kinds
Cultural life at his day: a taste of

baroque
?

Life,Works,Ideas
"a triangle has three angles"
statements like this are absolutely certain, but tell nothing about reality
"the sun rises in the
east"
statements like this describe
the real world, but are not certain
(
on
knowledge
)
"That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise."
Matters of facts are statements about facts. The opposite of a fact is another (possible) fact.
"In algebra ...it makes no difference to the certainty of the demonstrations and the truth of the propositions whether or not there are objects corresponding to the symbols employed."
(F. Copleston,
A History of Philosophy
, Image, 1959, vol. V, p. 274.)
Hume does not "intend to deny that we may feel certain that the sun will rise tomorrow ...It may be
highly

probable
that the sun will rise tomorrow,
but
it is
not certain
if we mean by a certain proposition one which is logically necessary and the opposite of which is contradictory and impossible."
(F. Copleston,
A History of Philosophy
, Image, 1959, vol. V, p. 276.)
Full transcript