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Symbols in Hamlet

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by

Sparky Ib

on 19 March 2013

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Transcript of Symbols in Hamlet

By Miguel Bergonia & Quincy in Bowen Symbols in Hamlet Symbols in Hamlet Disease Yorick's Skull Ears Poison Ophelia's Flowers Violet Rosemary Fennel Columbine Rue Daisy Faithfulness & Loyalty
"I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died." (IV.v.207) Remembrance & Faithfulness
Laertes receives rosemary from Ophelia
"There's rosemary, thats for remembrance. Pray, you, love, remember." (IV.v.199) Quickly wilts after it is plucked
Flattery, Male Adultery, Foolishness
Given to Claudius Emblem of Deceived Lovers
Foolishness
Claudius also receives a columbine from Ophelia A very bitter herb
Adultery, transgression and suffering of women
Given to Gertrude while Ophelia keeps one for herself
"There's rue for you, and here's some for me; we call it herb of grace o' Sundays. You must wear your rue with a difference." (IV.v.205)
It binds them, but in different ways Innocence, Loyal Love
Dissembling Disease
Yorick's Skull
Ears
Poison
Ophelia's Flowers "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark" (I.iv.67)
Reign of Claudius Death, Afterlife and Equalization
"Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well Horatio - a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy." (V.i.190) Human weakness for deception
"Tis given out that, sleeping in my orchard, a serpent stung me. So the whole ear of Denmark is by a forged process of my death rankly abused." (I.v.42) Lies that can be fed to people (used by Claudius)
"Sleeping within my orchard, my custom always of the afternoon, upon my secure hour thy uncle stole, with juice of cursed hebona in a vial, and in the porches of my ears did pour the leprous distilment..." (I.v.66) In Act 4, Scene 5 Ophelia has become insane
Flowers:
Violets
Rosemary
Funnel
Columbine
Rue
Daisy
Full transcript