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Judaism

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by

Evelyn Hou

on 11 September 2013

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Transcript of Judaism

Judaism
Rosh
Hashanah

Yom
Kippur

Sukkot
End.
Jewish Celebrations
Rosh Hashanah
Yom Kippur
Sukkot

By Francesca, Karin and Evelyn
What:
Most important holiday of the Jewish year
Reparation for a wrong or injury
Yom Kippur means “Day of Atonement”
To atone the sins of the past year
ONLY between man and god (NOT between two people)

When:
Begins: September 13
Ends: September 14
5 days before Sukkot
Where:
Most of the holiday is spent in the synagogue (praying)
In Orthodox synagogues: services begin at around 8 or 9am until about 3pm
People go home for a nap and come back at around 5pm for the afternoon and evening services that end at nightfall
Services end with the blowing of the ‘tekiah gedolah’
Why:
Most important holiday of the Jewish year
How:
No work can be performed on that day
Refrain from eating or drinking (including water)
Complete fasting from the evening of the day before and ending after the nightfall of the day
Customary to wear white, which symbolizes purity and promises the mind that their sins shall be as white as snow
Who:
Those who believe in Judaism
Exceptions:
children under ages 9 and women in childbirth (the time labor begins to three days after) NOT ALLOWED to fast, even if they want to
children older than 9 and women in the third to seventh day after childbirth are permitted to fast, but if they feel the need to break fast they are allowed to do so
Who:
Jewish people

Why:
it is a time to begin introspection, looking back at mistakes
What:
Hebrew meaning = “head of the year” or “first of the year”
Commonly known as the Jewish New Year
When:
Occurs on 1st and 2nd days of Tishri (seventh month of the Jewish year = the time when most important holidays happen)
Where:
Day is spent in the synagogue
How:
No work is permitted
One of the most important parts of this holiday is the sounding of the shofar in the synagogue.
Day is spent in synagogue, liturgy
Special prayerbook called the machzor used for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
Eating apples dipped in honey, a symbol of our wish for a sweet new year.
Tashlikh - cast off sins

Who:
Jewish People
Why:
To commemorate the 40 years where the Israeli were wandering in the desert
Harvest festival
What:
Last of the three pilgrimage festivals (after Shemini Atzeret and Simkhat Torah)
"The Season of our Rejoicing"
To commemorate the 40 years the Israeli were wandering in the desert - live in temporary shelters
When:
15th of Tishri
5th day after Yom Kippur
Seven day holiday
Where:
Dwell in Sukkah - temporary shelters like ancestors
Can be fulfilled by eating a full meal
Best if you stay and sleep there
Building a Sukkah:
3 walls covered with material
Roof made of sekhakh
Sekhakh: material that grew from the ground then cut off
Sekhakh must be placed on last
How:
No work is permitted on first and second day
Live in temporary dwelling place (Sukkah)
Bibliography
"Jewish Holidays: Sukkot." Sukkot. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2013. <http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/holiday5.html>
"Judaism 101: Rosh Hashanah." Judaism 101: Rosh Hashanah. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2013. <http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday2.htm>.
"Judaism 101: Sukkot." Judaism 101: Sukkot. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2013. <http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday5.htm>
"Judaism 101: Yom Kippur." Judaism 101: Yom Kippur. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2013. <http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday4.htm>
"Yom Kippur: History & Overview." Yom Kippur: History & Overview. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2013. <http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/holiday4.html>
Bibliography: Images
http://gosai.com/sites/gosai/files/kt/star-of-david.gif
http://www.myjewishlearning.com/images/legacy/shofar_language_293_files/image002.jpg
http://beautyfromscratch.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/apple-honey.jpg
http://www.sukkot.com/images/mendel-sukkah.jpg
Full transcript