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Luisa Dominguez

on 26 March 2015

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Transcript of Timeline

Historical Events
Bilingual Education Act of 1968
The Bilingual Education Act, Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1968 (or BEA) was the first piece of United States federal legislation that recognized the needs of Limited English Speaking Ability (LESA) students. The BEA was a significant piece of legislation that both reflected attitudes towards diversity and education in the country.
Mexico in the 1930's
Title IX
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance.

The Title IX regulation describes the conduct that violates Title IX. Examples of the types of discrimination that are covered under Title IX include sexual harassment, the failure to provide equal opportunity in athletics, and discrimination based on pregnancy. To enforce Title IX, the U.S. Department of Education maintains an Office for Civil Rights, with headquarters in Washington, DC and 12 offices across the United States.

No Pass No Play
More opportunities open up for women

No Pass
No Play
Title IX
Impact on the Generation
Students that cannot speak English as a first language are now being taken care of
Multicultral based assessments start to bloom
More opportunities open up for those coming from around the world

Things such as:
special titles
A Better and comforting place to live
This impacted: my sister
My older sister, who is the 1st born (January 14, 1987).
Raised by my mother who at the time only knew how to speak spanish.
This lead my sister to only knowing spanish as her 1st language.
Thanks to the BEA of 1968.
She was able to take bilingual classes in her early years of education.
Has now graduated as a Sam Houston Bear Kat!
Rebecca Ramirez
Class of 2014: SHSU: Criminal Justice

The governments that ruled Mexico from 1921 to 1933 are known as the Northern Dynasty.
This regime sought to establish order while developing the economy and increasing the internal market by land reform and higher wages.
There was bitter opposition during this period from the clergy, landowners, foreign investors and ambitious generals within their own ranks.
land reforms
of Calles and Portes Gil
expanded the internal market
created peace
in rural areas. Obregon brought
organized labor
into the government and
improved wages
Economic productivity rose
mining resumed
and the northern
city of Monterrey became a center for steel production.
Calles established friendly relations with the United States, however efforts to control the oil industry remained a serious concern
these reforms, large pockets of
discontent remained
in Mexico in the 1930's.
Combined with
the great depression that began in 1929
, the Mexican economic recovery came to a halt.
The government and its labor allies had become
Impact on Generation
It's a tradition for the boys (10-13 yrs old) to be working
The girls had to either help around with the animals on their farms or sell produce so their families could have something to eat.
School was not an option, but why?
Due to the Depression:
Even if they tried,
Due to their location:
Only transportation at the time, walking.
No schools at all or none near by
It would be dangerous (weather, animals, or criminals)
Tough Time
This impacted: my Grandpa and Mom
My grandpa was raised in a ranch called La Cabecera, Mexico.
He did not get the opportunity to go to school.
he began to work on his parents farm at the age of 13 and took part of the farming business ever since
he had kids of his own (11 children, 8 girls & 3 boys; this is including my mom)
My grandpa to this day, still does not know how to read or write but is great at math.
My mom attended school when she was 7 years old.
Every sibling of hers started school at 1st grade (there was no such think as pre-kinder or kindergarden).
It took her nearly 1 hour and 30 min. to get to school, walking.
She attended Leona Vicario (primaria; grades 1st-6th) and Miguel Hidalgo Secundaria (grades 7th-9th).
There was another school she was supposed to attend to, to finish to get her diploma but her father (my grandpa) didn't allow it
Then my mom and her siblings began to help my grandpa with the farm afterwards.
Grandpa, born September 1930 and is now 76 years old
Rebecca Hernandez, born September 6, 1964
Impact on Generation
This impacted: Me!
It all began when I was 8 years old (2003)
The No Pass No Play rule stipulates that Texas public school students who participate in extracurricular activities must achieve a passing grade (70% or higher, 60% or higher for Pre-AP or AP courses) each six-week grading period in order to qualify to continue participating in extracurricular activities such as athletics, band, and orchestra. If students receive at least one failing grade on their report card during a given six-week grading period, that student is forbidden or ineligible to participate in extracurricular activities until the failing grade or grades have been improved to passing levels.
Impact on Generation
Students became motivated for school
We a see a great amount of success
increase in dedication and value on their assignments
Students begin to hold themselves accountable
This impacted: My brother
My brother, who is the youngest (June 18, 2000)
Always had a huge interest in sports.
Worst quality, actually getting his work done in class.
He couldn't grasp the importance of education
, he began to join school teams, made a change for himself, just so he could continue doing what he likes best.
Plino Jr. Ramirez; My little track star
age: 13 years
attends: Washington Jr. High
proffesional leagues
Women are being respected a lot more
In school
the work place
Their ideas and thoughts are taken into consideration
No longer the outcasts
taught myself how to skate, swim, and ride a bike.
became inspired by others (like my sister)
Played in my very first soccer, basketball, vollyball and track team when I got to Jr. High (brought what was self taught to every tryout)
Then Highschool came along (2009-2013)
Played baskestball freshmen year
Moved to soccer and played on varsity sophmore-senior year
Playing sports is my life!
Full transcript