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Argumentation

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by

Pamela Case

on 29 January 2014

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Transcript of Argumentation

Argumentation
The Art of
Persuasive Writing

What is Argumentation?
What are we going to learn?
A Proper Introduction
Concluding Your Argument
A Solid Support Paragraph
Argumentation is when you argue with someone to persuade them to agree with your position or point of view on a topic.
We are going to learn about organizing an argument and the persuasive techniques we can use to really be effective at writing one.
The introduction of an argument is very important because:
The body paragraphs of your persuasive essay support and back up your claim made in the Introductory paragraph.
Your conclusion should sum up and reemphasize the main points of your argument. Then give your audience a final thought about it or something to do about it.
It gets the audience's attention!
Tells the audience what the argument is and what position you are taking.
How do I get the
audience's attention?
You want to start the introduction with something interesting. Here are some options:
personal anecdote/story
an example, real or hypothetical
a quotation from someone well-known
shocking statistics
in writing, create a striking scene or image
What is my thesis statement?
In Argumentation, your thesis statement is your
Claim
!
Remember, your
Claim
is a position or point of view that is backed up by evidence.
Your
Claim
is the focus of your whole argument!
Claim
You begin your argument by
stating your claim.
Back up your claim with a main point and then prove that main point with evidence.
State Main Point #1
Evidence
Explain how evidence backs up the main point.
Evidence
Explain how evidence backs up the main point.
Concluding
Statement
Explain how all Evidence in
paragraph proves your Claim.
State Main Point #2
Evidence
Explain how evidence backs up the main point.
Evidence
Explain how evidence backs up the main point.
Concluding
Statement
Explain how all Evidence in
paragraph proves your Claim.
Repeat the process with Main Point #2.
State Main Point #3
Evidence
Explain how evidence backs up the main point.
Evidence
Explain how evidence backs up the main point.
Concluding
Statement
Explain how all Evidence in
paragraph proves your Claim.
Repeat the process with Main Point #3.
Conclude your argument by summing up your Claim and connecting it to your reader.
Summarize your Main Points
Connection to Audience
Give them a call to action.
OR
Tell them why they should care about how this topic will affect the future.
Introducing the
Counter-Claim
After your introduction, you state the other side of the argument as clearly and forcefully as you can, pointing to their evidence where possible.
Ways to Introduce Counter-Claim
One might object here that...
It might seem that...
It's true that...
Many people [believe/argue/feel/think/suppose/etc.] that [state the counter-argument here]
It might [seem/appear/look/etc.] as if [state the counter-argument here]
On the other hand, [the author] argues that...
[the author] takes the position that...
Getting back to your point
After introducing and talking about the Counter-Argument, you need to return to your argument in this same paragraph. Ways to do that are:
but, yet, however, nevertheless, or still...
What this argument [overlooks/fails to consider/does not take into account] is ...
This view [seems/looks/sounds/etc.] [convincing/plausible/persuasive/etc.] at first, but ...
While this position is popular, it is [not supported by the facts/not logical/impractical/etc.]
The Counter-Claim
Introduce and argue against the other side.
Once you've introduced the Counter-Claim, or other side, into your argument, you need to
Refute
it. This means, you need to
argue against it
or
prove it wrong
as you argue.
Writing Do's and Don'ts
Do
use transitional words in your writing
(within your paragraph and while moving from paragraph to paragraph)
to help the reader move smoothly through your argument
Do
use a formal style of writing and tone of writing voice
Do
use 3rd person point of view: she, he, they, a person, someone
Don't
use: I, Me, My, You, Your
Don't
use: & or + instead of 'and' OR cuz or cause instead of 'because'
Full transcript