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Academic Student Success Programs (ASSP)

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Susy Cuevas

on 23 September 2015

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Transcript of Academic Student Success Programs (ASSP)

Intrusive Advising
Mandatory and voluntary interventional advising practices for students identified by predetermined indicators.
Learning Communities

Cohort of students who are intentionally brought together through enrollment in two or more courses for at least one term with the purpose of integrating learning and fostering community to enhance students’ academic persistence and success. Effective learning communities require faculty development for participating instructors.


First-Year, Second-Year, Transfer Seminars and Experiences
• Intended to integrate first year students and transfers into a community of peers, faculty, and staff.

• On-campus and/or off-campus activities that intentionally connect to campus culture, institutional mission, and student need.

• A purposeful set of curricular and/or co-curricular programs, structures, services and activities that support first year students and transfers in their introduction and adjustment to the institution and the quality of their learning, development and success in the educational environment during the first year.

ASSP
Collaborative Assignments and Projects
Combines two key goals: learning to work and solve problems in the company of others, and sharpening one’s own understanding by listening seriously to the insights of others, especially those with different backgrounds and life experiences. Approaches range from study groups within a course, to team-based assignments and writing, to cooperative projects and research.
Supplemental Instruction
Academic assistance program that utilizes peer-assisted regularly-scheduled, informal review sessions in which students compare notes, discuss readings, develop organizational tools, and predict test items. Students learn how to integrate course content and study skills while working together. The sessions are facilitated by “SI leaders”, students who have previously done well in the course and who attend all class lectures, take notes, and act as model students.
Diversity/Global Learning/Study Abroad
Many colleges and universities now emphasize courses and programs that help students explore cultures, life experiences, and worldviews different from their own. These studies—which may address U.S. diversity, world cultures, or both—often explore “difficult differences” such as racial, ethnic, and gender inequality, or continuing struggles around the globe for human rights, freedom, and power. Frequently, intercultural studies are augmented by experiential learning in the community.
Common Intellectual Experiences
The older idea of a “core” curriculum has evolved into a variety of modern forms such as a set of required common courses or a vertically organized general education program that includes advanced integrative studies and/or required participation in a learning community (see below). These programs often combine broad themes—e.g., technology and society, global interdependence—with a variety of curricular and cocurricular options for students.
Culminating experiences require students nearing the end of their college years to create a project of some sort that integrates and applies what they’ve learned. The project might be a research paper, a performance, a portfolio of “best work,” or an exhibit of artwork. Capstones are offered both in departmental programs and, increasingly, in general education as well.
Capstone Courses and Projects
Internships
Common form of experiential learning. The idea is to provide students with direct experience in a work setting— usually related to their career interests—and to give them the benefit of supervision and coaching from professionals in the field. If the internship is taken for “course credit,” students complete a project or paper that is approved by a faculty member.
Writing-Intensive Courses
Emphasize writing at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum, including final-year projects. Students are encouraged to produce and revise various forms of writing for different audiences in different disciplines. The effectiveness of this repeated practice “across the curriculum” has led to parallel efforts in such areas as quantitative reasoning, oral communication, information literacy, and, on some campuses, ethical inquiry.
Student engagement in original research, scholarly activity, and/or creative activity, are activities that contributes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the student field and are mentored by a faculty member, with the goal of publication, presentation, performance, or exhibition of the results or products.
Undergraduate Research
Service Learning, Community-Based Learning
Field-based “experiential learning” with community partners is an instructional strategy—and often a required part of the course. The idea is to give students direct experience with issues they are studying in the curriculum and with ongoing efforts to analyze and solve problems in the community. A key element in these programs is the opportunity students have to both apply what they are learning in real-world settings and reflect in a classroom setting on their service experiences. These programs model the idea that giving something back to the community is an important college outcome, and that working with community partners is good preparation for citizenship, work, and life.
Early Alert
Mandatory and voluntary academic coaching and study strategies services for identified and referred students.
Mentor Services
A learning and development partnership between someone with vast experience and someone who wants to learn between student and peer/staff/faculty.
Summer Bridge
Experience which provides a campus-based or commuter transition program that builds students’ sense of belonging (connectiveness) to the university and students’ self-efficacy.
Summer Transition (non-EOP summer bridge experiences)
Experience which provides a campus-based or commuter transition program that builds students’ sense of belonging (connectiveness) to the university and students’ self-efficacy.
Pedagogy Sphere
Coordinated Student On-Campus Employment
Program designed to coordinate and support student employment opportunities.
Academic Student Success Programs (ASSP)
Expanded Summer Bridge
Chico

REACH
Chico

Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Goals and Outcomes
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Student Characteristics
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Student Characteristics
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Student Characteristics
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Student Characteristics
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
National Partners
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Student Characteristics
Program Descriptions
Related Literature
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Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Metrics
U Course Learning Community
Chico
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
EOP Star
East Bay
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Intrusive Advising and Data Analytics
East Bay
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Men's Success
Long Beach
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
First and Second Year Intrusive Advising
Long Beach
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Supplemental Instruction
Fullerton
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP)
Long Beach
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
GANAS
East Bay
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Peer Mentor Services
East Bay
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Supplemental Instruction
Fresno
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
SupportNet- Early Alert
Fresno
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Expanded Freshman Learning Communities
Fresno
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
WST Intervention
Easy Bay
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Enhancement of Early Warning System (TEWS)
Northridge
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Circuit Analysis Lecture and Lab Peer Assistants
Northridge
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
First Year Experience
Los Angeles
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Collaborative Problem Based Learning in STEM
Los Angeles
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Targeted Advising in Science, Engineering, Business, and the Arts
Long Beach
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
EOP Summer Bridge
Long Beach
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Partners for Success
Long Beach
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Non-College Ready Commuters
San Diego
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
College Ready Commuters
San Diego
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Office of Student Research (OSR)
San Bernardino
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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My Paw Print
San Bernardino
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Metrics
First Year Programs
Sacramento
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Metro College Success
San Francisco
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Technology to Increase Success & Decrease Gap
San Jose
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Cal Poly Scholars
San Luis Obispo
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
First Year Success Program
San Luis Obispo
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Proactive Advising for Targeted Groups
San Luis Obispo
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
DEGREES
Sacramento
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
University Undergraduate Research Office (UURO)
Pomona
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Residential Intensive Summer Education
Pomona
Poly Transfer Program
Pomona
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
EOP Expansion
Pomona
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Second Year Success Programs
San Luis Obispo
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Supplemental Workshops
San Luis Obispo
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Metrics
Transfer Success Program
San Luis Obispo
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Infrastructure Enhancement for Student Success
Sonoma
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Peer Mentor Leadership
Sonoma
Student Characteristics
Program Description
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Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
Sophomore Year Experience
Sonoma
Student Characteristics
Program Description
Related Literature
Goals and Outcomes
Metrics
The Academic and Student Success Program (ASSP) is a practitioner learning community comprised of forty-four distinct student success programs on fifteen California State University campuses. ASSP began during the 2013-2014 academic year through a $7.2 million annual continuous allocation of funding. Campuses submitted applications to expand and design new student success programs focused on High Impact Practices.
The Council of Undergraduate Research (CUR) www.cur.org: The CSU currently holds a system-wide membership to CUR. Each campus has designated three Institutional Representatives and one Prime Contact whom receive CUR newsletters, resources, and event information.


Retention Services
San Luis Obispo
Source: National Center for Education Statistics

66%

2009

1990

46%

1976

30%

34%

2009

1990

1976

19%

15%

enrollment by students eligible for financial aid:

enrollment by Hispanics, African-Americans, and Asians:

enrollment rates of 18- to 24-year-olds in degree-granting institutions

2009
top 41%

1970
top 26%

whom we teach

ACT
YEAR 1- 2013-2014 Academic Year: ASSP projects revised and continued to enhance practices.

YEAR 2- 2014-2015 Academic Year: ASSP project directors, assessment coordinators, and support staff created a culture of assessment, increased communication with campus stakeholders, and many were invited to present on their progress.

YEAR 3- 2015-2016 Academic Year: ASSP projects will refine their assessment culture and practices. Collaborate cross-project events (HIp Leadership Retreats, in-person worksessions, webinars, and presentations to determine best practices, HIP definitions, and common metrics. Areas of special focus include identifying target student populations, or all students eligible to benefit by the project services, and writing S-M-A-R-T outcomes.
PLAN
YEAR 1- 2013-2014 Academic Year: ASSP projects received initial funding to enhance and create new High Impact Practices

YEAR 2- 2014-2015 Academic Year: ASSP project directors, assessment coordinators, and support staff continued to refine and build programs and were identified and trained in the online assessment software, TaskStream.

YEAR 3- 2015-2016 Academic Year: ASSP projects will continue to collect outcome assessment evidence and make project plans and revisions guided by internal assessment and formative feedback from the ASSP Assessment Committee.
DO
YEAR 1- 2013-2014 Academic Year: ASSP projects engaged in their enhanced and newly created High Impact Practices

YEAR 2- 2014-2015 Academic Year: ASSP project directors, assessment coordinators, and support staff continued to administer and build programs, were identified and trained in the online assessment software, TaskStream, and began to collect assessment evidence in accordance with the ASSP annual assessment cycle

YEAR 3- 2015-2016 Academic Year: ASSP projects will continue to administer their programs, collect outcome assessment evidence, make project revisions guided by internal assessment and formative feedback from the ASSP Assessment Committee, and attend collaborative events to inform uniform HIP definitions, metrics, outcomes, and practices.
STUDY
YEAR 1- 2013-2014 Academic Year: ASSP projects conducted internal evaluation of project enhancements and creation.

YEAR 2- 2014-2015 Academic Year: ASSP project directors, assessment coordinators, and support staff conducted outcome and an overall project assessment analysis and reported results in TaskStream. The ASSP Assessment Committee designed a project assessment rubric and provided formative feedback to programs.

YEAR 3- 2015-2016 Academic Year: ASSP projects will continue to internally assess their projects at the outcome and project level. The ASSP Assessment Committee will provide annual formative feedback on assessment activities. ASSP projects will join together to study current ASSP project practices, HIP definitions, metrics, outcomes, evidence, and students served to determine commonalities.
High Impact Practice: Peer Mentor Services (501)
Target Population (Not yet defined by program)


Population Served (See TaskStream to duplicate table)

Target Population
Population Served

CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

REACH Operational Effectiveness Set

REACH Student Success Outcome Set











































High Impact Practice: Summer Bridge (600)
The mission of Expanded Summer Bridge is to ensure first-year first-generation college students are provided information on and access to resources that will help them acquire the skills and knowledge necessary for a successful transition from high school to college.
CSU, Chico Summer Bridge provides approximately 200 first-year, first-generation, low-income college students, many of whom are also underrepresented minorities (URM), an extended (12 day) university orientation highlighted with extensive transition and academic support. The program will satisfy the Early Start Requirement for both math and English and give non-traditional admits an opportunity to form a community of peers prior to the start of the academic school year.

Summer Bridge also is an opportunity for EOP participants to meet each other and the faculty and staff who will be assisting students in the fall. While at Summer Bridge the students will be provided various intentional opportunities to develop relationships with staff/faculty/community mentors and residential advisors, experience university lectures, and attend a variety of workshops and interactive presentations. Without Summer Bridge a higher percentage of our first-year freshmen would drop out as early as their first semester and the graduation gap between traditional students and underrepresented minority students would be much higher.

During Summer Bridge, freshmen will also be able to finalize housing plans, complete financial aid files, and register for fall semester courses. Students will also attend workshops to help with their transition to the University. They include: Campus / Classroom Etiquette, Financial Aid, Housing Information, Life Management, Test Anxiety, Why College, Blackboard Learn, Academic Advising, Psychology and Multicultural Gender Studies Class Lectures, ELM prep (math classes) and English class sessions and workshops, and Summer Orientation.

CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Expanded Summer Bridge Operational Effectiveness Set

Expanded Summer Bridge Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Learning Communities (400)
U-Courses are committed to supporting first-year student engagement through student-centered, interdisciplinary learning communities in project-based courses. U-Courses provide trained mentors to model successful academic behaviors for and give appropriate assistance to first-year students. These courses will foster student success, providing opportunities to transform classroom learning into public action.
"U-Courses: Learning by Design" is a curriculum redesign project created to address problems of engagement and student success:

Problem 1: Lack of engagement by first-year students in first-year courses. Our first-year course offerings are standard "Foundations" courses--including English, Mathematics, History, American Government, Sciences--which students believe they have just completed in high school. The First-Year Experience Program is committed to providing students with non-traditional, engaging and challenging structures in our Foundations courses to signal to students immediately our heightened expectations and our commitment to providing both depth of content learning and emphasis on applied learning. At present, nearly 20% of our incoming population is on academic probation at the end of the first semester; U-Courses are designed to reduce repeatable grades and the academic probation index.

Problem 2: Graduation gap between URM and non-URM students of 16%. The redesigned curriculum, which will initially be marketed extensively to URM students and which will include the majority of students from the REACH student success program for first-generation college students, is structured to include extensive mentoring by accomplished students who can both assist with course work and model successful college student behaviors. The emphasis on facilitated team projects will integrate URM students/first-generation students with non-URM and college-savvy students to produce supported learning environments that value students' diverse out-of-course experiences as well as academic interests and talents.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

U Course Learning Community Operational Effectiveness Set

U Course Learning Community Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Summer Bridge (600)
The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) values the ability to improve the academic, social, and personal experiences of all EOP students. The EOP Student Transition and Retention (STAR) yearlong program exists to transition first generation low-income freshmen students to Cal State East Bay. Through strategic planning, programming, and academic and personal support, students are more equipped to handle the rigors of being a college student.
The purpose of the Sophomore Year Experience (SYE) program is to
meet the unique needs of sophomores by offering second-year students appropriate services, programs, and curricula by enhancing existing programs and developing new initiatives.



In 2013-2014, Sonoma State University implemented a Sophomore Year Experience, designed to provide the kind of institutional support that our sophomores need. The program included academic components that piloted in the School of Social Sciences and co-curricular components that piloted campus-wide. The School of Social Sciences was a particularly good school to house and test a sophomore year experience program because almost all second-year undergraduates take at least one general education social science course. Moreover, nearly 40% of students who enter their second year without a major choose majors in the School of Social Sciences.

The SYE program consists of five key components that employ high-impact practices to engage second-year students and improve their success:
• Summer letter and Welcome Back Event for sophomores. The letter, event, and other campus opportunities (e.g., Sophomore Challenge Week) provide resources for students to address sophomore year goals and opportunities for them to reconnect with faculty, peers, and the campus.

• MAP (My Academic Plan). Advisors and students work together to develop a coherent, meaningful story of the student’s learning in both academic and non-academic realms. The MAP process will be implemented through a series of advising workshops (supported by Advising, Career Services, U-Engage, and the SYE team) as well as one-on-one advising with faculty and school advisors.

• Sophomore Seminar: How to Think Like a Social Scientist. In this course, students and faculty explore the disciplinary ways of knowing specific to the social sciences. Students engage in collaborative research projects on real-world topics as they practice core skills — oral and written communication, quantitative reasoning, information literacy, and critical thinking. The teaching team includes Peer Facilitators (the SYE incarnation of the FLC Peer Mentors).

• Undergraduate Project Initiative. Second-year students will be eligible to apply for funding to engage in research or community projects under the sponsorship of a faculty member. The results of their work will be presented in a public forum each year.

• Faculty Development. Faculty will draw upon local expertise in order to develop curriculum and pedagogical tools that are effective in reaching sophomores of different backgrounds and abilities.

STAR is an intensive year long academic support program for EOP exception admits. STAR participants initiate their transition to Cal State East Bay by participating in our Summer Bridge program then moving forward to the academic year component. . Summer Bridge is a five-week intensive academic program designed to assist incoming freshman students with their transition from high school to CSU East Bay. During Summer Bridge students will learn academic skills necessary to succeed at CSU East Bay.

After completing the Summer Bridge program students are offered year-long services (Fall- Spring) including remedial math tutoring, a General Studies course, reading comprehension tutoring, peer mentors, and intrusive academic advising.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

U Course Learning Community Operational Effectiveness Set

U Course Learning Community Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Learning Communities (400)
The mission of the GANAS Program is to increase the number of educationally underserved students who graduate with baccalaureate degrees or higher.

The GANAS Program aims to help transfer students:
• make a smooth transition from a two-year college to a four-year university
• develop a network of support
• succeed academically
• reduce time to degree
GANAS serves new students who transfer from a community college to CSU East Bay in the Fall quarter. An application process is in place to select participants that can benefit from GANAS services, as well as commit to participation in required coursework and engagement. To date, we serve 71 students transferring from 29 California Community Colleges, spreading over 17 counties. 80% of our students are female. 78% of our students identify as Latino. GANAS students are enrolled across 19 different majors at CSU East Bay.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Sophomore Year Experience Operational Effectiveness Set

Sophomore Year Experience Student Success Outcome Set
The mission of the Peer Mentor Leadership grant is to prepare and support Peer Mentors and enhance faculty professional development preparation for working with their Peer Mentors to create the best possible transition-to-college curriculum in our Freshman Learning Communities.
The students supported by this grant are all our freshmen enrolled in Freshmen Learning Communities. Since our recent scale-up of our FLCs (made possible, in part, by this grant), approximately 1600 of our 1800 freshmen are enrolled in FLCs.

The GANAS (Gaining Access 'N Academic Success) Program is an innovative access and retention program that offers integrated academic and cultural programming to welcome and socialize new transfer students while increasing their confidence, engagement, academic success, persistence, and, ultimately, baccalaureate degree attainment rates.

Students participate in a year-long cohort-based learning community paired with a transfer success seminar, intrusive academic counseling, and mentoring. Students will complete their upper division GE requirements (B6, D4, C4 and CGW) by taking three successive courses during their first year at Cal State East Bay. Latino/a faculty who are committed to student success will teach GANAS courses. GANAS helps students integrate their home and school identities by creating a sense of familia (family) within the cohort. Students fulfill upper division G.E. breadth requirements by enrolling and completing the required GANAS courses during the first year. While GANAS is open to all students, our program provides Latino/a-themed academic content and supportive services.
Program goals include:

Increase one-year retention rate for GANAS students to minimally be equivalent to white transfer students
Increase the overall retention and graduation rate of GANAS students compared to other non-GANAS Latino/a transfer students
Reduce achievement gap for Latino/a transfer students by improving outcomes for GANAS students
Increase the reputation of Cal State East Bay among the Latino/a community, regionally and statewide
Increase Latino/a transfer student access, admission, and matriculation to CSUEB
Fall 2014 FCL Participants (base year)
The Office of Undergraduate Studies oversees Sonoma State University’s

Freshman Learning Communities (FLCs). The cornerstones of our FLCs

are the first three High Impact Practices (First Year Courses and Experiences,

Common Intellectual Experiences, and Learning Communities), and all

include at least one more additional HIP. Through participation in an FLC,

first-year students connect with SSU and one another while taking

innovative and academically enriching classes that fulfill one or more GE

requirements. FLC class sizes are intentionally kept small (approximately

25 students per section) to assist the faculty, staff, and student leaders in

each community in creating an active and engaging learning community.

The overarching goal of our FLCs is to increase retention rate of our

freshmen and, ultimately, to provide our freshmen with a solid start

toward graduation.



Prior to the 2012-2013 school year, we offered FLCs to only about half

of our first-year students. But after an intensive effort across the campus,

we extended our FLC offerings to include many new courses in the Schools

of Arts and Humanities and Science and Technology. Beginning with the

2013-2014 academic year, we were offering enough seats in FLC’s to

accommodate almost all of our 1800 first-time freshmen.
A key element of the success of our FLCs is the placement of Peer Mentors,

who provide vital support to our freshmen, in every class section. Peer Mentors

assist the faculty and first year students inside and outside the classroom. To

become an FLC Peer Mentor, students must complete a rigorous course, UNIV

238 (Foundations of Leadership), before they can apply for a position. Peer

Mentors then use the principles of leadership that they have learned in UNIV 238

as they undergo summer preparation and weekly training sessions throughout the

school year. The leadership course (which also is prerequisite for nearly all campus

leadership positions) and follow-up training sessions are an especially valuable

intellectual and social resource for our underrepresented minority students, as they

help students to see themselves as leaders in their university community. This

Leadership Program’s outstanding preparation and support of Peer Mentors has

been and continues to be a key factor in our FLC program.


In addition to preparing the Peer Mentors to work with our freshmen and the faculty

who teach inthe FLCs, we also need to support FLC faculty as they team up with

these Peer Mentors. Professional development can help faculty maximize the value

of the Peer Mentors’ contribution to the classes and support of the students, as well

has helping faculty to integrate transition-to-college issues into course content.

The funding for the Peer Mentor Leadership program supports the Leadership

Course, Peer Mentor salaries, and stipends for faculty professional development

opportunities.

High Impact Practice: Intrusive Advising (300)
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Peer Mentor Leadership Operational Effectiveness Set

Peer Mentor Leadership Student Success Outcome Set
The mission of our Infrastructure Enhancement for Student Success program is to enhance our advising and student tracking staffing and protocols in order to successfully track, communicate with, and advise our most at-risk freshmen and sophomores.
The students supported by this grant are first year students who are at-risk of being dis-enrolled or disqualified for the following reasons:


a.
Not taking their ELM and/or EPT by the start of their freshman year.
b.
Failing to successfully complete their required remediation by the conclusion of their freshman year.

c.
Being placed on academic probation due to low GPA.
Student Demographics
*Not taking their ELM and/or EPT by the start of their freshman year (Fall 2013 - baseline year
*Failing to successfully complete their required remediation by the conclusion of their freshman year (Fall 2013 - baseline year)
*Being placed on academic probation due to low GPA (Spring 2013 - baseline year)
SSU’s Infrastructure Enhancement for Student Success program is designed to enhance our tracking, communicating with, and advising of our most at-risk lower division students. We know that, historically, many of our students who leave SSU before completion of their first year have been disqualified for one of three reasons:

1) Failure to complete the CSU-required EPT and/or ELM by the start of their freshman year.
2) Failure to successfully complete remediation in Math and/or English by the conclusion of their freshmen year.
3) Low GPA that results, first, in being placed on Academic Probation after Fall semester, followed, a semester or two later, by Academic Disqualification.

A major impediment to our ability to support these at-risk students has been lack of adequate staffing to conduct necessary “intrusive” advising. To advise these students proactively, we need to be able to track their progress, communicate as often as necessary the reason(s) why they are at risk, and advise them, face-to-face, to help them understand what they need to do to avoid disenrollment or disqualification from the University. Unfortunately, decimated by budget cuts over the previous several years, our IR, Records, and Advising departments had been steadily shrinking, making this type of proactive attention to students impossible. With this goal in mind, our Infrastructure Enhancement for Student Success Enhancement project involved the addition of three positions, one in IR, one in Records, and one in Advising:
AAS I Institutional Research Analyst (IR)
SSP II Academic Requirements Maintenance Specialist (Records)
SSP III Advisor and Compliance Specialist (Advising)

In addition, we requested and received funding to grow our Peer Advising program. Peer Advisors are specially trained juniors and seniors who help students with questions and support anyone who needs help navigating the PeopleSoft system. In addition, one

Peer Advisor was to be assigned to specifically support the Compliance Specialist.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Infrastructure Enhancement for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Infrastructure Enhancement for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The Mustang Success Center coordinates and provides timely, effective advising services to first and second year students, first year transfer students, and student-athletes. Through individual appointments, group advising sessions, and workshops, the advisors help students understand University policies and procedures, offer a full range of proactive academic services, refer students to appropriate campus resources, and provide leadership in coordinating College and University programs that support student success
East Bay's graduation rate after six years is about 43% overall. Our 08 Cohort currently sits at about 35% after four years, and our 09 Cohort is estimated to be only slightly higher. These low rates cut across all subsets of our student body. While women graduate at slightly higher rates than men, and White and Asian students graduate at much higher rates than African American and Hispanic students, CSUEB graduation rates for all populations remain at the low end for all CSU campuses. For every 100 freshmen of an ethnicity starting at CSUEB, 52 of the Asian students will graduate in 6 years, 47 of the White students will graduate after 6 years, 30 Hispanic students will graduate in 6 years, and 24 African American students will graduate in 6 years. Over half of CSUEB freshman class members are first-generation college students, and well over 60% need remediation in English or math and often both.
University Advising and the Mustang Success Center have implemented an innovative, campus-wide program to help new transfer students who have been placed on academic probation after their first or second quarter. This program is not college-specific, and includes volunteers from across the University in various offices/roles volunteering their time to lead academic coaching sessions with first year transfer students. Coaches build a connection with students, reflect on challenges and strengths, and develop action plans for the upcoming quarter. The program began in fall 2013 and has served 153 students to date.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Transfer Success Program Operational Effectiveness Set

Transfer Success Program Student Success Outcome Set
Cal Poly Supplemental Workshops in Science and Math are both intensive programs designed to help students achieve success in their math and science courses.
Supplemental Workshops in Science (SWS) has been an integral part of the Cal Poly campus since 1991. It assists students in mastering course concepts, promotes collaborative learning, and provides accelerated learning environments linked with specific challenging courses. Workshop participants are guided by trained facilitators who are upper division students.

Workshops involve concept enhancement, problem solving, the development of study strategies and mock exams; they are held twice weekly and carry one unit of baccalaureate credit. Workshops are designed as student-centered learning communities and allow students to work successfully with a diverse group of peers in a structured setting.

The program is funded through Student Academic Services, Cal Poly’s Student Success Fee, a California Lottery grant, and is supported by the College of Science and Mathematics.

Supplemental Workshops in Math (SWM) has been successful in providing unique learning environments to Cal Poly students since 1988. The program is designed to help students succeed in some of Cal Poly’s first and second year challenging math courses. Workshops allow students to review and discuss concepts covered in class, engage in problem solving, develop study strategies, and prepare for exams.

Workshops are one-unit classes linked with specific math courses. They meet twice a week and are led by a trained facilitator, usually a junior or senior-level student majoring in a math or science discipline.

The program is funded through Student Success Fee (SSF) and Entry Level Math (ELM) and is supported by the College of Science and Mathematics.

CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Supplemental Workshop Operational Effectiveness Set

Supplemental Workshop Student Success Outcome Set
The Mustang Success Center coordinates and provides timely, effective advising services to first and second year students, first year transfer students, and student-athletes. Through individual appointments, group advising sessions, and workshops, the advisors help students understand University policies and procedures, offer a full range of proactive academic services, refer students to appropriate campus resources, and provide leadership in coordinating College and University programs that support student success
University Advising and the Mustang Success Center have implemented an innovative, campus-wide program to help students entering their second year on academic probation. This program is not college-specific, and includes volunteers from across the University in various offices/roles volunteering their time to lead academic coaching sessions with second year students. Coaches build a connection with students, reflect on challenges and strengths, and develop action plans for the upcoming quarter. The program began was ran as a pilot for Fall 2014 and is currently being assessed for future consideration.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Second Year Success Program for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Second Year Success Program for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The Intrusive Advising program will involve selecting students from each graduation cohort on an annual basis, by reviewing information about students remaining in good academic standing after four years at East Bay, but who have not yet graduated.

Those with roughly 160 or more units completed will be invited to a one-time workshop to review graduation requirements, in an effort to ensure that they are aware of all requirements.

Those with fewer than 90 units completed will be invited to participate in a series of workshops including study skills, time management, and graduation requirements, to make sure that they are aware of their own slow progress, and how this pace may be counter-productive.

Those with approximately 140 – 160 units completed will be invited to participate in the intrusive advising program, requiring them to meet with an advisor quarterly, accept recommendations regarding course selection and unit limits, and maintain appropriate grade point averages each quarter. In return, we will agree to provide that intrusive advising, waive certain fees, and assist them with course selection and possible alternate classes. The goal would be to graduate as many as possible within the five year or six year deadlines.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

U Course Intrusive Advising Operational Effectiveness Set

U Course Intrusive Advising Student Success Outcome Set
The mission of CSUEB’s General Education Peer Mentor Services is to assist first year college students, freshmen and transfer alike, to make a successful transition to the University and continue to thrive despite challenges they may face. Peer mentors provide year-long personal and academic support with the aim of increasing students’ engagement, persistence, academic achievement and eventual degree attainment.
High Impact Practice: Peer Mentor Services (501)
The Program began in 2009-10 with 7 Peer Mentors (PMs) in 7 sections of General Studies (GS). PMs are paired with General Studies (GS) faculty within sections of the Learning Community Clusters. In the past 6 years the sections with PMs have ranged from 28-42. During 2014-15 PMs have been assigned to 28 of the 56 General Studies sections. Of the 1476 entering students this fall we have been directly serving the needs of approximately 738 students.
The Program offers year-long academic support for first year students, including international students. They work hand in hand with the faculty, meeting weekly to help design curriculum and activities and within the classroom to implement those ideas. In addition, they meet each of their students 1-on-1 in fall term and continue to check in with them as the year progresses. They promote and facilitate study and social events and each are part of a committee that has some part in helping the Program develop. In 2015-16 we will launch a pilot program for a limited number of transfer students with the intent of scaling up.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Peer Mentor Services Operational Effectiveness Set

Peer Mentor Services Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Tutoring (1900)
Program Goals
Provide undergraduate CSUEB students who have yet to fulfill the University Writing Skills Requirement (UWSR) opportunities to practice and apply their critical thinking and written communication skills to the Writing Skills Test (WST).
Provide a simulated WST exam experience with support and feedback from Student Assistants, Exam Readers, and the Facilitator.
Upon successful completion of the Boot Camp, provide a test fee waiver and registration for the WST in order to eliminate financial and scheduling barriers associated with the exam.

Recruitment
This program targets senior students with 108+ units at CSUEB to participate in program.

Outcomes
Program Outcomes: Passage rate of the WST for Boot Camp participants will be a 5% increase over test takers who did not take the Boot Camp; Feedback from participants, readers, and facilitators about Boot Camp pedagogy, format, learning styles, etc.
Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to communicate effectively in Writing and Critical Thinking; Identify the four parts of the writing process via pre and post tests
Student Accountability: Participation in program as is correlates to persistence and graduation, increasing the number of degrees awarded, and improving the CSU graduation rate.
CSUEB seniors participating in the Student Center for Academic Achievement (SCAA’s) intensive, 2-session Writing Skills Test (WST) Boot Camp will be able to prepare for the WST by engaging in writing activities that foster literacy and communication skills, enhance knowledge about writing processes, and increase student confidence in their test taking ability, leading to timely completion of the University Writing Skills Requirement (UWSR).
The Mustang Success Center coordinates and provides timely, effective advising services to first and second year students, first year transfer students, and student-athletes. Through individual appointments, group advising sessions, drop-in advising, and workshops, the advisors help students understand University policies and procedures, offer a full range of proactive academic services, refer students to appropriate campus resources, and provide leadership in coordinating College and University programs that support student success.
University Advising and the Mustang Success Center
have implemented an innovative, campus-wide program to help new students who have been placed on academic probation after their first or second quarter. This program is not college-specific, and includes volunteers from across the University in various offices/roles volunteering their time to lead academic coaching sessions with students. Coaches build a connection with students, reflect on challenges and strengths, and develop action plans for the upcoming quarter. To date the program has performed proactive advising with 2,303 students and trained 134 coaches.

CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

First Year Success Program for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

First Year Success Program for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The Cal Poly Scholars program is aimed at recruiting and retaining high achieving students from California Partner High Schools. The scholarship program provides a renewable $3,000 annual housing grant, workshops and advising, and a living-learning community residence experience. CP Scholars students receive an Apple mobile device to support their 21st century learning. As a university-wide program, the Cal Poly Scholars program is a unique rallying point, bringing together Admissions, Housing, the Office of Financial Aid, Student Academic Services, the Mustang Success Center, and the participating academic colleges.
Eligibility and Selection

Consideration for the Cal Poly Scholars program is automatically determined upon admission to the university. There are no additional forms to fill out. Students are notified if they have been selected for a CP Scholars award when they receive their financial aid package.
Selection for the Cal Poly Scholars program is based on the following criteria:

•Graduation from a Cal Poly Partner High School. Partner high schools are those identified as serving a substantive number of first generation or low-income students.

•Admission to the University and enrollment in a College/Major that offers CP Scholars

•Completion of a Financial Aid Application (FAFSA or California Dream Application)

•A qualifying maximum family income and Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Currently, the maximum family income is $80,001 and maximum EFC is $12,001.


The goal of the CP Scholars Committee and University Administration is to provide a CP Scholars award to every eligible student. However, depending on availability of funding and the capacity of the program, priority for Cal Poly Scholars awards may be determined by student need, GPA, SAT Score, or other admissions criteria.

Current Scholar Characteristics
The Cal Poly Scholars is a residential program for select students who are housed together on campus, in an inter-disciplinary student community, creating one of the most cultural living-learning experiences on campus. Dedicated and specially trained professional staff, from across campus, partner to provide support, inspire whole-system thinking, and offer Learn-By-Doing experiences. This is offered through a two-year residential model.

The Cal Poly Scholars program model provides intentional engagement opportunities that invite Scholars to discover their intellectual talents, navigate the University, and connect to their individual college. This model is applied to utilizing a program tracking tool of student progress, participation, and interventions. It also engages the Faculty, staff, advisors, and students through programs and activities such as industry field trips, hands on learning, recognition luncheons, class registration parties, achievement ceremonies, and mentorship.

Specific to a block scheduling model and the Poly Planner tool, students generally take similar courses by major in their first year, allowing them to live, learn, and study with fellow Scholars who have similar interests.





The CP Scholars program seeks to support Cal Poly students through all 4 (and occasionally 5) years of study. Our program model is divided to meet the specific needs of Year 1 & 2 students, and Year 3 & 4 students.

YEAR 1 & 2
•Student academic achievement is supported by the core team of advisors, with emphasis from the CP Scholars Coordinator and the Mustang Success Center Advisor.
•Programs focus on building skills for college success, such as course registration, financial aid, study skills, transfer credit, and identifying campus resources.
•Student community and engagement are encouraged through the living-learning community and on-campus housing. CP Scholars are encouraged to live and learn together.

YEAR 3 & 4
•Student academic achievement is supported by the core team of advisors, with emphasis from the academic advisors in the student’s college and major.
•Programs focus on skills for career and lifelong success, such as leadership, service to community, networking, and identifying personal strengths and areas for growth.
•Student community and engagement are encouraged through service, mentorship, and outreach to young scholars. CP Scholars are asked to serve as mentors to young Scholars in the same field of study or to support outreach and recruitment at their former high school.

Concept Description
The Program Model
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Cal Poly Scholars for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Cal Poly Scholars for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The mission of the Metro College Success Program is to increase equity in college completion through engaging, supportive, rigorous and socially relevant education.

Outreach and recruitment focuses on low-income, underrepresented and/or first-generation students.
The Metro College Success Program is designed for new high school graduates, with recruitment focused high schools and community-based organizations that serve our target population: students who are low-income, underrepresented and/or first-generation college-goers. SF State Metro students must be able to carry 12 units or more per semester and be in the top third of their high school graduating class.

The following is a total of fall 2014 and spring 2015 students.


The Metro College Success Program, operated by San Francisco State University in partnership with City College of San Francisco, aims to increase rates of graduation and university transfer by supporting students during their first two years of college—a critical period when attrition is highest. We recruit from high schools and community-based organizations that serve our targeted populations: students who are low-income, underrepresented, and/or first-generation college-goers.

Our program sets up Metro Academies, each serving as a ‘school within a school’ for up to 140 students, 70 in their first year and 70 continuing in their second year. Each academy has a broad career or topic theme, such as Metro Academy of Health or Metro Academy of Science, enabling students to engage early in their field of interest.

Each academy has three main components:
A cohort design, structured around a guided pathway of general education courses required for all 289 California State University majors. Students take two linked classes per semester over four semesters, building close ties among peers, faculty and counselors who follow them throughout the program. The courses are designed to systematically build the academic foundation skills of writing, critical thinking, math and oral communication, through repeated practice and increasingly challenging assignments.
Wrap-around services based in Metro classes, including academic counseling, tutoring, and financial aid advising.
A 45-hour faculty development process, which prepares faculty to use high-impact educational practices, discuss student progress and intervene early on problems, and work on continuous program improvement.


CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Metro College Success Program for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Metro College Success Program for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
Aztec Freshman Connection is a learning community designed specifically for freshman students San Diego areas who are living at home or off-campus, referred to as “commuter” students. Casa Azteca is a learning community designed specifically for freshman students from south bay neighborhoods living at home or off-campus, referred to as “commuter” students.

Both programs are designed to help students transition to the university, aid in academic success and support retention to the University.
Aztec Freshman Connection and Casa Azteca were desgined for commuter freshman students who had at least one level of remidiation. A total 168 students were in the Casa Azteca and Aztec Freshman Connection program during the fall 2014 semester. Of those 168 students, 148 of the students were accepted into the university with at least one level of remediation.
One level of remediation refers to students needing either one level of math or rhetoric and writing. Two remediation levels refer to students needing two remediation courses which can include two levels of math or a combination of one level of math and one level of rhetoric and writing. Level three refers to students needing two levels of math and one level of rhetoric and writing.
Aztec Freshman Connection and Casa Azteca students are placed in course packages and given a maxixum of three academic mentors.

The course packages include:
•General Studies 250: In-College-Shape (1 unit), August 17-19, 9am-4:30pm each day ◦​During this short 3-day class, students meet the peers who they will be with during the fall semester. They discuss what to expect from college, and the transition from a high school student to a college student.

•General Studies 100B: University Seminar (1 unit) ◦​In this class, they go over strategies to help you be successful at SDSU. Some of these include, time management, test taking, identity development, study skills, and much more.

•A General Education (GE) course (3 units) ◦​Students take either sociology 101, political science 102, or psychology 101 (depending on their major).

•A Supplemental Instruction course (1 unit) ◦This class provides support for the general education course listed above.

•RWS: Rhetoric and Writing Studies (3 units) ◦​This is the writing course that all students are required to take in their first year.

•Academic Mentor ◦​Academic Mentors support the student by mentoring and tutoring the students through their first semester. Students are required to meet with each mentor a minumum of 30 minutes every week. Depending on the courses the students are enrolled in, students may receive a mentor for math, RWS, and science. Students are given the option of conitnuing the mentoring program during the spring semester.
-CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

- Non-College Ready Commuters for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

- Non-College Ready Commuters for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
-CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

-College Ready Commuters for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

-College Ready Commuters for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The Compact Scholars Program is the post secondary component of the Compact for Success – an innovative partnership between the Sweetwater Union High School District and San Diego State University. The program supports student success by connecting students to the diverse resources of the San Diego State campus community. Compact Scholars actively engage in high-impact educational practices, including first-year seminars, study abroad, learning communities, service-learning, undergraduate research, and internships. The goal of the Compact Scholars Program is to deepen student engagement and to promote higher retention and graduation rates for Sweetwater District students attending SDSU.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

WST Intervention Operational Effectiveness Set

WST Intervention Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Tutoring (1900)
Discipline specific freshman learning communities structured around redesigned GE courses that develop critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, and communication skills within a discipline specific framework will more effectively engage students and increase their academic performance in gateway courses in the discipline.
Graduates from the Compact for Success program in the Sweetwater Union High School District who have satisfactorily met the following benchmarks are eligible:

- Maintain continuous enrollment in the SUHSD schools from the 7th to 12th grade

- Attain a CSU GPA of 3.0 or higher by time of application and maintained this GPA through senior year

- Complete all a-g course requirements

- Satisfiy the ELM (Entry Level Math Placement) requirement

- Satisfy the EPT (English Placement Test) requirement

- Take the SAT or ACT test

The success of our Compact Scholars is especially noteworthy because a majority of students in the Compact Scholars Program are underrepresented students in an at risk category. Annually, half of the newly matriculated cohort is comprised of first-generation students and 91% are students of color. Additionally, over a third of Compact Scholars are low-income. As of our spring 2014 census report, 44% of the Compact Scholars were Pell-Grant eligible. Finally, all Compact Scholars are local students that have graduated from the Sweetwater Union High School District. 95% of Compact Scholars are commuter students that live at home with their parents and commute to campus from the South Bay cities of Chula Vista, Imperial Beach, National City and San Diego, including the communities of Bonita, Eastlake, Otay Mesa, San Ysidro and South San Diego.
The first year of this project has focused on the creation of a STEM-First Year Experience within the College of Science and Mathematics targeting at-risk FTF with declared majors in Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science, or Physics.



Benefits of the Compact Scholars Program include:

- Individual student success advising focused on academic, personal, and career interests

- Freshmen University Seminar

- Academic Learning Communities

- Social and community events organized by the SDSU student organization, Scholars for Success

- On campus DUS Student Learning Lounge for individual or group study

- Scholarship Opportunities

- Undergraduate research and internship opportunities

- Community service and leadership opportunities in the Sweetwater Union High School District

- Homeroom Blackboard Academic Suite


We are enrolling more Compact Scholars than ever before and they are persisting and graduating. (Once the students graduate from SUHSD and enroll at SDSU we identify them as "Compact Scholars" and support their success as members of the Compact Scholars Program.) To date over 3000 Compact Scholars have enrolled at SDSU. Our goal to improve graduation rates over time requires the strategic use of data and we have been tracking student progress since the first class of Compact Scholars enrolled in 2006. Using data to design interventions, to track improvements in performance, and to drive innovations, has been essential in cultivating a campus-wide shared focus on student success. The results of our concentrated efforts have been and continue to be positive. The continuation rate for Compact Scholars has improved 10% in comparison to what it was prior to the initiation of Compact services. Our six-year graduation rate for Compact Scholars is commensurate with the university-wide rate at 65.3%. By comparison, in fall 2000, before the implementation of a Compact Scholars Program, the 6-year graduation rate for Sweetwater students attending SDSU was 44.8%.
The Office of Student Research (OSR) aspires to be known as a clearing house for all the research and creative activities undertaken at CSUSB. The OSR mission is to enrich the academic experience of all CSUSB graduate and undergraduate students by providing research and scholarly experiences in their chosen fields. Our vision is that the OSR will be regarded as the CSUSB entity that best encourages and supports students’ inquiry, discovery, and creativity in all disciplines through faculty student relationships, research, and creative activities. By doing so, the OSR will contribute to CSUSB’s mission to offer a challenging and innovative environment to retain graduation rates, driven by teaching and research excellence, intellectual interaction and creativity.
Course redesign

The following courses are redesigned: Music (MUS 124), Human Development (HD 480), History (Hist 379) and Biology (Bio 395) and Chemistry (Chem 438A)
Peer lab, Peer Consultant, and Summer Research Program
Six risk factors were identified based on the academic performance (GPA, GPA in gateway course, retention, and graduation rate) of 4 cohorts of entering first time freshman. At-risk students were defined as those possessing three or more of these risk factors:

1. Underrepresented minorities including Hmong students.
2. First generation college students.
3. High school GPA below 3.5
4. Less than 8 semesters of high-school mathematics
5. SAT Math scores below 550
6. SAT Verbal scores below 500


Students possessing one or more of the following elimination factors were removed from the list of students:

1. High school GPA below 2.7
2. Remedial in math (requiring more than one semester to prepare for MATH 75A Calculus with Review).
3. SAT Verbal below 400.

Of approximately 800 incoming majors in science and mathematics, 114 students met these criteria. Each of these students was sent an invitation to participate in the STEM FYE program via mail and email. Approximately one week after the initial invitation, each student received a follow-up call from a faculty member involved in the program.
Peer Lab
Peer Research Consultant
Summer Research Program 2014
We propose the development of a STEM focused Learning Community -First Year Experience program (STEM-FYE) that will target at-risk students interested in majoring in STEM fields. Students will be invited to participate in this program at the time of admission based on an automated review of risk factors taken from their admissions file. The program will use several high-impact strategies. In their first semester, STEM-FYE students will enroll in a learning community designed to reinforce core competencies essential for success in all science and mathematics disciplines. This learning community will engage students using three authentic core scenarios using established high-impact teaching practices, such as near-peer instruction, cross-curricular assignments, workshop-style courses, and field experiences. The Learning Community will be supported by the university’s Supplemental Instruction(SI) and tutoring programs.
During the fall 2013 term the OSR received a competitive CSU Chancellor’s Academic Student Success Program grant to allow further development of research related programs. At this stage the grant has allowed for the creation of:

Course Redesign Program:
Centered on the successful HIPS practice of involving students in research and creative activities, the OSR has launched an initiative to support course design/redesign. Any full­time faculty member, tenured or tenure­track from any department is welcome to apply. Each applicant must be supported by their chair/program director.

Summer Research Program:
The OSR Summer Research Program is designed to provide funding and resources to support any undergraduates who are interested in any research projects or scholarly activities related to their field. The program supports faculty mentors and students as they collaborate on a scholarly project or creative activity. The ten week program begins the first week of summer, and includes a series of workshops designed to develop students’ research and presentation skills and help them prepare for graduate school. The Program culminates in an undergraduate research conference where students present their findings.

Peer Lab Program:
The mission of the OSR Peer Lab program is to increase student retention and success in upper division courses by providing collaborative peer learning experiences that improve understanding of subject content, foster critical thinking, and strengthen study skills. The OSR Peer Lab program is modeled after the Supplemental Instruction (SI) model to assist students by providing regularly scheduled, out­of­class supplemental instruction sessions. Peer Lab targets high-risk courses rather than high-risk students.

Peer Research Consultant Program:
The mission of the OSR Peer Research Consultant program is to contribute to building a community of scholars that foster innovation and develop a sense of purpose and achievement. Peer consultants are upper division undergraduate students or graduate students who assist instructors with turning course assignments into research projects. Peer consultants will assist students as they implement, design, analyze, and disseminate the results of their projects. Specifically, the OSR Peer Consultants will assist with framing questions appropriate for the discipline, implementing and conducting class investigations, and reporting findings in writing and/or orally to the class and to a broader audience.

Peer Statistician:
The peer statistician’s role is to assist students with questions about SPSS, data analysis, survey design and administration.


CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Expanded Freshman Learning Communities Operational Effectiveness Set

Expanded Freshman Learning Communities Student Success Outcome Set
The OSR is also testing a pilot program designed to assist students with questions about SPSS, data analysis, survey design and administration. More information will be available during the fall quarter.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Office of Student Research for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Office of Student Research for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Early Alert (100)
SupportNet provides quality services including early alert and academic coaching to the students of Fresno State. We promote student self-responsibility, academic success and life-long learning.
The 2013-2014 SupportNet cohort consisted of 2,629 (data includes students in other support programs) students who were referred from faculty including 143 students who were required to meet with SupportNet in order to fulfill their probation or disqualification contract. In total, 2,001 "unique" students were referred to meet with SupportNet.
SupportNet is an early-alert program at Fresno State that was launched fall 2008 with a part-time (50 percent) coordinator (SSP IV) and a full-time temporary advisor (SSP II). Referred students receive intrusive advising with study strategies and academic coaching. The 2008-09 cohort consisted of 300 referred students (64 percent from faculty). One hundred percent of faculty responded that they "would refer students to SupportNet again".

In 2012-13, over 1100 referrals were received from faculty - a 476 percent growth since the program's inception. Sixty-five percent of those referred by faculty are freshmen or sophomores. SupportNet also works directly with all academically disqualified first-time freshmen with a first-term GPA <.5 during their second term.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

SupportNet Operational Effectiveness Set

SupportNet Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Supplemental Instruction (700)
Supplemental Instruction (SI) provides the students of Fresno State with quality study sessions, effective learning techniques and opportunities for enriched student engagement. We promote student self-responsibility, academic success and life-long learning in order to improve student persistence towards degree completion.
Supplemental Instruction is housed within 6 colleges, 76 course subjects, over 200 course sections, and proudly serves over 10,000 students per academic year. SI is linked to disciplines such as Biology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Criminology, Computer Science, Economics, Electrical Computer Engineering, Kinesiology, Math, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, and Political Science. An SI participant is defined as having attended one or more SI sessions. The 2013-2014 SI cohort consisted of 3,123 unique students who participated in SI.
Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a high impact practice program proven to increase academic performance and retention for students enrolled in traditionally difficult courses. The program was developed by Dr. Deanna Martin at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) in 1973 and later recognized as an Exemplary Educational Program by the U.S. Department of Education. SI is unique because it focuses on high risk courses rather than high risk students and driven by higher level of critical thinking skills rather than memorization techniques. In addition, SI is effective because it aims to break the dependency cycle of authority figures and promotes different learning strategies. The International Center for SI at UMKC defines SI as a collaborative learning approach program that utilizes peer-assisted study sessions in which student leader facilitates regularly-scheduled sessions to enhance course content, develop study skills, and compare notes.

SI sessions are free, voluntary, and attendance is anonymous. Daily attendance is taken in order to compare final course grades of SI participants and non-participants; however, faculty members are not provided with the names of SI attendees. In order to promote a risk free learning environment, SI sessions are peer led and instructor free zones. Students of all levels of learning benefit from participating in SI sessions. Analysis of course data consistently shows students who regularly attend SI achieve a higher mean final course grade and pass rate than similar students who do not.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Supplemental Instruction Operational Effectiveness Set

Supplemental Instruction Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Supplemental Instruction
Supplemental Instruction (SI) is an academic assistance program that provides weekly, peer-led group study sessions for students taking bottleneck, key gateway, or historically difficult courses– those with high non-pass or withdrawal rates. SI is provided for all students who want to improve their understanding of course material and improve their grades; it is not just for those students who are struggling. The mission of Supplemental Instruction is to improve student persistence, increase graduation rates University wide, and narrow the achievement gap for underrepresented students.
Approximately 9,000 students per academic year have access to SI in courses in Accounting, Anthropology, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Geology, History, ISDS, Math, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, and Psychology. An SI participant is defined as having attended one or more SI sessions.
Supplemental Instruction (SI) was first developed in 1973 at the University of Missouri at Kansas City (UMKC) by Dr. Deanna Martin. The SI Program at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) began as a small experiment in 2007, and has since grown to be a major university program that has more than doubled in size this past academic year. SI targets traditionally difficult, key gateway and bottleneck courses; those that have a large number of students receiving a grade of C-, D, F, or W. Supplemental Instruction focuses on student retention and the act of facilitating learning, which is accomplished in SI though the identification of the difficult course, placement of a SI Leader, and regularly scheduled peer-facilitated SI group sessions. SI is not study hall, nor is it tutoring. The goal of SI is to create independent learners, and the SI leader, is the link between the actual class and SI session, where course readings, content, and material are brought together with effective learning strategies in a collaborative learning environment. Through SI, students gain the ability to synthesize ideas and formulate questions regarding course content and material, and ultimately take power over their own learning. Students of all academic and learning abilities and levels benefit from participating in SI sessions. Moreover, students who attend SI sessions on a consistent basis, traditionally earn a half to full letter grade higher than those students who do not participate in SI.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Supplemental Instruction Operational Effectiveness Set

Supplemental Instruction Student Success Outcome Set
The My PawPrint program facilitates service learning experiences that serve the public good. My PawPrint is a key component of the university-wide culture of community engagement as a high impact practice that contributes to student success.
The My PawPrint program facilitates CSUSB students’ service learning participation by simplifying processes and removing barriers to participation. The My PawPrint image is directly related to Cody Coyote, the school mascot, with the intention of boosting school spirit while facilitating service learning placements where students can “leave their pawprint” on the community. The My PawPrint program includes CSUSB’s customized version of the Chancellor’s Office S4 (Supporting Students and Service Sites) web application, which is designed to easily manage the CSU’s risk management processes and provide students, faculty and community partners with a user-friendly interface to manage students’ service learning experiences. Students utilize the website to sign up for service learning placements, and selected service learning experiences are fully managed, including faculty training, site coordination, classroom presentations, transportation and guided reflection sessions.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

My Paw Print for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

My Paw Print for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The mission of California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo's Student Academic Services (SAS) Retention Services is to provide support for first-generation, low-income, and Underrepresented Minority (URM) students, on their path to graduation. We aim to enhance student academic and co-curricular success by encouraging students to identify their individual strengths and to seek campus resources designed to help them flourish.
The SAS retention program is an emerging, comprehensive program at the California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) that coordinates current and new transition and retention services to support increased persistence among first generation, low-income and ethnic and racial minority college students. SAS is a division of Student Affairs at Cal Poly whose mission is to “provide access, facilitate transition to the university environment, and assist in the development of academic and personal skills, thus promoting academic success towards graduation for a diverse student population” (Student Academic Services, 2014). SAS primarily serves first generation, low-income and ethnic and racial minority students. We define first generation students as those for whom neither parent has obtained a four year degree. Low-income students are those who are Pell grant eligible. These student populations are critical at Cal Poly because only 26% of Cal Poly’s incoming first year class self-reported as first generation in fall 2013 (Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement, 2013), while only 18.2% are Pell Grant recipients and 18.7% are URM (Cal Poly Profile: Undergraduate Enrollment, 2015).

Additionally, 88.6% of first generation, 90% of Pell Grant recipients, and 89.4% of URM students return after one year (Cal Poly Profile, First Time Freshmen Persistence, 2014), compared to 92.7% for all first time freshmen (Cal Poly Fact Book, Fall 2014). Although statistically, these one year retention rates are relatively high, they are still less than the retention rates for the general population of undergraduates at Cal Poly. Furthermore, the university’s four-year graduation rate is 37.1% and its six-year graduation rate is 78%, respectively. The work of the retention specialist is closely connected to Cal Poly’s graduation rates, particularly for those special populations served by SAS

*At the end of every quarter, we invite students to participate in a stress-buster. Our goals for the events are to demonstrate our support, help students connect to one another, and to provide strategies for preparing for finals.

Student success workshops.

*For the first year of the program, the 2014-15 academic year, we provided several co-curricular workshops on the following topics: Study Abroad, Communication, Library Research, Career Development (Career Fair and Summer Break), Summer Classes, and Open Access to Textbooks.


CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Retention Services for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Retention Services for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
The Dedicated to Educating, Graduating, and Retaining Educational Equity Students (DEGREES
) Project seeks to provide enhanced services to undergraduate students to make timely progress to their degrees and to advance efforts to close the achievement gap. The overarching goal of the program is to connect students with a variety of campus resources to impact their overall success in college.
The Cal Poly Pomona Office of Undergraduate Research’s mission is to increase the awareness of, participation in, and opportunities for undergraduate research across the disciplines and for students who are traditionally underrepresented in research: lower-division students, and first-year transfer students, as well as under-represented and first-generation students. Support faculty members who mentor undergraduate student researchers. As an umbrella office, coordinate efforts of programs that provide undergraduate research opportunities.
The mission of this program is to educate and empower students through the process of self-discovery, exploration and personal development as they prepare for career success in the global workforce.
1.Coaching: DEGREES Project coaches are knowledgeable upper-division students who specialize in advancing a student’s educational and career success through connection to established programs and services.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

DEGREES for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

DEGREES for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
Summary of Student Characteristics (Refer to Table 1)

· DEGREES students are similar to URM students on every measure of student characteristics, academic preparation, academic patterns, and choice of major across the Fall 2013 FTF and transfer cohorts.
· DEGREES students are more likely to be URM than all freshman and all transfers in the 2013 cohort.
· The majority of DEGREES students are California residents but less likely to come from the Sacramento area than all freshman and transfers in the 2013 cohort.
· More DEGREES students are low-income (i.e., Pell eligible) and first-generation college students than all freshman and transfers in the 2013 cohort.
· A smaller percentage of parents of DEGREES students have at least a bachelor’s degree compared to all freshman and all transfers in the 2013 cohort.
The Dedicated to Educating, Graduating, and Retaining Educational Equity Students (DEGREES) Project is designed to promote the retention and graduation of all campus underrepresented students. The overarching goal of the program is to connect students with a variety of campus resources to impact their overall success in college. Services provided by the DEGREES Project include:
2. Advising in the Colleges: The DEGREES Project has advisors in four of the seven colleges: the College of Business, the College of Arts and Letters, the College of Health and Human Services, and the College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies. College advisors meet with students and provide college-specific advising to further students’ educational and career goals.
3.Smarthinking: 24/7 online tutoring service available to Sacramento State Students through their SacCT Blackboard student system. Smarthinking provides tutors on multiple subjects, including math, economics, statistics, biology, chemistry and writing.
4.“U” Mentor: A university mentorship program in which students are matched with a faculty/staff member using an online platform called Mutual Force. Once matched, students are able to maintain active communication with their mentors (face to face and through the online platform) and receive assistance with academic advising, career advising, and overall achievement of success.
In collaboration with the University Center for Undergraduate Advising (UCUA) and the Beach Learning Communities (BLC) population, career counselor from the Career Development Center (CDC) engaged BLC students in a major exploration process and personal and professional development activities throughout the 2014-2015 academic year.
5.Peer and Academic Resource Center (PARC): A home base of support in which students receive a wide array of support services, including supplemental instruction courses, workshops, and tutoring.

Demographics of students participating in OUR sponsored activities and the Student Research Conference (SRC) is similar to that of overall student population at CPP. Approximately 600 students participated in OUR sponsored activities and 190 students presented research at the SRC.

Two tables - 1 by demographic, 1 by class rank
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

First and Second Year Intrusive Advising Operational Effectiveness Set

First and Second Year Intrusive Advising Student Success Outcome Set
Target Population
Underrepresented Minorities
Low-Income (Pell Eligible)
First-Generation
List Class Rank in table
All Students at Cal Poly Pomona
Profile of undergraduate students participating in Office of Undergraduate Research sponsored events, for the 2013-14 Academic Year.
High Impact Practice: Intrusive Advising (300)
High Impact Practice: Faculty/ Staff Mentor Services (502)
The majority of students served by MSI identify as African American or Latino. However, there are students that participate with MSI who identify as Pacific Islander, Southeast Asian, Middle Eastern, and Caucasian. Participation with MSI include attendance at weekly MSI meetings, participation in MSI activities and events, and discussions with MSI staff members on items regarding academic, social, professional, and personal concerns of our students.
College representation of students who participated in OUR sponsored activities or presented in the SRC during the 2013-14 Academic Year. These are compared to the general CPP population and faculty reported* percentage of undergraduate student researchers by college.
Student Selection Process
OUR-CPP is open to all students and academic disciplines across campus. There is no specific student selection process


Program Services, Events, and Activities
Workshops
TRAVEL AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS, & GRANTS
ANNUAL STUDENT RESEARCH CONFERENCE
Summer Creative Activities and Researh Symposium
BRONCO SCHOLAR ELECTRONIC REPOSITORY
The Office of Undergraduate Research at Cal Poly Pomona (OUR-CPP) was established in the fall of 2013 to increase undergraduate student participation in research. The goals of OUR-CPP are:

The Men’s Success Initiative (MSI) provides support and resources to African American and Latino men as a way to enhance in their academic, personal, and professional success.
Goal 1. Increase the number of first-generation, low-income, and URM students who participate in UR
Goal 2. Increase the number of students who participate in UR-related opportunities (scholarships, research internships, conferences, etc.)
Goal 3. Provide a starting point for students interested in research through workshops and the OUR website.
Goal 4. Increase discipline diversity in UR.
Goal 5. Increase funding for UR scholarships and travel through grants and fundraising.
Goal 6. Increase the overall number of CPP students that participate in UR.
Goal 7. Provide resources to students who are interested in continuing research in graduate school.
Goal 8. Become the umbrella office for all undergraduate research related programs and activities.
Goal 9. Collect and disseminate data about UR participation and outcomes.
The Men’s Success Program is a critical part of the Highly Valued Degrees Initiative (HVDI) in building student success and raising the overall CSULB graduation rates. The goals of the Men’s Success Program are to help increase graduation rates and diminish the achievement gaps for underrepresented minority students. The current target populations for the Men’s Success Program are African American and Latino male students. The Men’s Success Initiative (MSI) provides support and resources to African American and Latino male students as a way to assist in increasing graduation and retention rates for these student populations. MSI’s focus is on student engagement as Alexander Astin’s work on student engagement shows that interactions with the college environment increase the likelihood that a student succeeds and graduates.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Men's Success Advising Operational Effectiveness Set

Men's Success Student Success Outcome Set
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

UURO for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

UURO for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
Program Components:
Summer Symposium
Weekly Meetings
Study Jams
Faculty & Staff Mentors
Tutoring Services
Men of Color Conference
University & Community Partnerships
High Impact Practice: Faculty/ Staff Mentor Services
For 27 years, the mission of CSULB’s Partners For Success Program is to directly assist in the retention and graduation of first-generation and at-risk students through the individual mentoring relationships and support of experienced Partners Faculty. During Fall 2013, Partners implemented the Sophomore Strategic Intervention Initiative (SSII), an intentionally designed faculty mentoring program to address the critical needs of CSULB ‘high at-risk’ second year students which are on first or second semester academic probation and unaffiliated with a support program. Individual Solution Focused Strategies for College Students (ISSc) is an academic counseling intervention which is grounded in evidence based practices specifically with a Solution-Focused Brief Counseling theoretical framework. ISSc augments the mentoring of the Partners Faculty.
CSULB's Partners for Success Program has identified and is continuing to serve the at-risk student population of second year students on first or second semester of academic probation as well as being unaffiliated with a student support program. The first step in identifying the student cohort is to run a CS Link report with the correct variables. The second step is to verify that the students are unaffiliated with another support program bycross-referencing with the following programs:1) Educational Opportunity Program; 2) Student-Athlete Services; 3) Center for International Education; 4) Beach Learning Community. Finally, the Partners Program automatically enrolls the students into the Program so they have a support network of a dedicated Partners Faculty Mentor and the Sophomore Strategic Intervention Inititative to assist them. For the purpose of this data assessment, the second year students are students that entered as first time freshmen in Fall 2013 and particpated in the Partners Sophomore Strategic Intervention Inititative (SSII). Each semester, the Partners Faculty Mentors serve a new cohort of mentees.

There were 213 Students identified as unaffiliated second-year students on first or second semester academic probation in August 2013. There were 172 Mentees that were enrolled in Fall 2013 and invited to participate in the Program. Of the 172, 146 participated in meetings with their Partners Faculty Mentor in addition to having an academic advising meeting with their College or UCUA. There were 36 Partners Faculty Mentors representing 22 academic departments.
It is the mission of the Poly Transfer Initiative CPP to ensure a transfer receptive culture by providing resources and programming to connect and support transfer students so they can achieve their desired academic, professional, and personal goals.
PolyTransfers’ target audience is first-generation, low-income, and/or underrepresented minorities—although our programs are open to every transfer student on Cal Poly Pomona’s campus. Additionally we have 5 partner community colleges, and work closely on outreach, on-campus prospective student programming, and connections with their first year experience programs. These institutions are: Pasadena City College, Rio Hondo College, Citrus College, Chaffey College and Mt. San Antonio Community College.

We Support Transfer Students By…

•Providing personalized problem solving and guidance through accessible and dedicated professional staff and student assistants
•Offering quarterly information based workshops that support their success towards completing their academic, professional, and personal goals
•Partnering with a variety of CPP departments to continue transfer specific initiatives and increase visibility of services and support available to this population

CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Poly Transfer for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Poly Transfer for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
During Fall 2013, Partners implemented the Sophomore Strategic Intervention Initiative (SSII), an intentionally designed faculty mentoring program to address the critical needs of CSULB ‘high at-risk’ second year students which are on first or second semester academic probation and unaffiliated with a support program. Individual Solution Focused Strategies for College Students (ISSc) is an academic counseling intervention which is grounded in evidence based practices specifically with a Solution-Focused Brief Counseling theoretical framework. ISSc augments the mentoring of the Partners Faculty.
In support of CSULB’s Highly Valued Degree Initiative (HVDI), the Partners Sophomore Strategic Intervention Initiative will continue to show a direct correlation to the retention of unaffiliated second year students on academic probation. For 2014-2015, the second year of SSII, the goals are an increase in retention rates and a reduction of the achievement gap with this special population.The SSII goals are for the unaffiliated second year students to successfully pass their courses, increase their GPA, clear probation, avoid disqualification and persist to graduation. The students will also increase their self-efficacy about their academic skills and strengths
PolyTransfer is a First-Year Experience program for transfer students that focuses on the recruitment, transition, and retention of first-generation, underrepresented minority, and/or low-income transfer students. Our program aims to:

We Connect Transfer Students To…
•Programming specific to new transfer students to help them successfully transition to CPP
•Information, referrals, and support services that assist with navigating the CPP system
•A variety of transfer-specific social events and activities so they can interact and engage with their peers
As part of Student Support & Equity Programs, the mission of Summer Bridge is included in the mission of the department:

We are dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of non-traditional and undecided students through a broad range of high quality programs and services that promote access and equity, transition, and educational opportunities in support of student learning and success; thus empowering them to become educated and engaged citizens who go on to lead productive and meaningful lives.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Partners for Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Partners for Success Success Outcome Set
Student Characteristics:
-Incoming EOP first-time-freshmen students are invited to participate in Summer Bridge. EOP eligibility is determined by the EOP Application Family Income Guidelines.
-EOP students are first-generation and meet low income guidelines. Most of them are underrepresented minority students. Our gender distribution is typically equally distributed between males and females. Our ethnic distribution is highly Hispanic/Latino. We generally have a larger Black/African American population than the campus. Other ethnic groups have lower distributions than the campus at large. All academic majors are represented equal to the campus figures.

Student selection process:
-Students are invited to attend a Summer Bridge information meeting in Spring, and if interested, students are invited to submit their Summer Bridge application.
-Detailed information about expectations in the program is shared with students at the information meetings.
-Students’ applications are then reviewed with detail to check any concerns regarding the students’ ability to participate in the program fully and succeed. This includes a review of their admission status, math and English remediation requirements, and other important information.
-Students who are selected are then sent communication that they have been selected and are asked to confirm their attendance at Summer Bridge. Detailed information about expectations is provided again to remind students before making a commitment.
Length of Summer Bridge Program:
•The program is five weeks total. The first three weeks are residential (students live in a campus residence hall during this time) and the last two weeks are commuter (students drive in and out of campus each day of the program).


General Description and Comments about the Program:
•Each summer a select group of entering freshmen EOP students participate in summer transition programs. The incoming freshmen program is called Summer Bridge. These programs offer academic components, workshops, seminars and activities that help you have a successful transition into participant’s first year at Cal Poly Pomona. They offer a unique opportunity for students to become acquainted with campus departments and resources, develop friendships and experience campus life before they begin their first quarter at the university.
•Participation in Summer Bridge is by invitation only. Newly entering EOP Freshmen who participate in the Summer Bridge Information Meetings will be considered for participation. If students have been admitted as an EOP student, and have returned their EOP Acceptance Agreement, they will be sent an email invitation to participate in Summer Bridge. Once students have attended an Information Meeting, their name will be placed on the list for consideration for Summer Bridge and they will be notified in late May or early June if they have been selected to participate.
•Summer Bridge is a "Closed Campus" program. In order to ensure students' safety and for the students to obtain the greatest benefit from the program, students stay on campus from Sunday through Thursday during the residential portion of the program, no exceptions.
•Summer Bridge is a comprehensive program. Due to the intensity of classes, workshops, seminars, tutorials, and residential activities, as well as restrictions on leaving our campus, students are not permitted work Sunday through Thursday each week during the program. It is possible students may work Thursday evening to Sunday morning, however, this is discouraged. Students will be given homework each day and over the weekend.

The mission of the Summer Bridge Program is to provide newly admitted students the opportunity to bridge the academic, cultural and social gap from the high school environment to the university environment. We consistently offer educational and enrichment programs that assist the students in developing personally and academically to prepare them for success in the university.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

EOP Expansion for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

EOP Expansion for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
California State University, Northridge is committed to educational opportunity, inclusion and excellence. Realizing the need for a more aggressive approach to increase retention, CSUN began working toward becoming a learning centered university. TEWS is a student centered support system, created with the sole purpose of facilitating the early interaction of faculty, students, advisors and other student service areas. TEWS is a tool that can ensure the early identification of students who may be in need of some level of intervention to ensure their persistence and academic success at the university. TEWS recognizes the importance of: (1) easing the new student's transition into the college environment, (2) early systematic identification of those students who may be academically at risk, (3) early identification of students who may be having difficulties in and out of the classroom and, (4) establishing a common communication link between students and their instructors, advisors and relevant student services. The implications promise to be far-reaching.
CSUN first year students that are identified as at-risk and/or are enrolled in developmental mathematics, writing and University Seminar.
Realizing the need for a more aggressive approach to increase retention and student persistence, the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) at CSUN created The Early Warning System (TEWS). TEWS is a technology-enables support system that can provide real-time (72 hour) turnaround response back to faculty users. It was created with the sole purpose of facilitating the early interaction of faculty, students, advisors and other student service area staff to create deeper learning and engagement and aid in student persistence and academic success at the university.
CA CSU Student Success and Accountability Metrics

Enhancement of Early Warning System for Student Success Operational Effectiveness Set

Enhancement of Early Warning System for Student Success Student Success Outcome Set
High Impact Practice: Summer Bridge (600)
The mission of Circuit Analysis Lecture and Lab Peer Assistants (CALLPA) is to improve students’ performance and increase passing rates for all students enrolled in each section of ECE240 and ECE240L by hiring one Teaching Assistant in each section of ECE240 and one qualified Laboratory Assistant for ECE240L referred to as Peer Assistants.
Table 1: Selected Characteristics of ECE 240 and ECE 240L Peer Assistants
The current program is designed
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