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Using games to teach Grammar & Vocabulary

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Daniela Curadelli

on 26 February 2014

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Transcript of Using games to teach Grammar & Vocabulary

Types of language games
2. INFORMATION GAP GAMES: In such games, one or more people have information that other people need to complete a task. For instance, one person might have a drawing and their partner needs to create a similar drawing by listening to the information given by the person with the drawing. Information gap games can involve a one-way information gap, such as the drawing game just described, or a two-way information gap, in which each person has unique information. For example: TABOO.
Theory

Games are fun activities that promote interaction, thinking, learning, and problem solving strategies.
Types of language games
1. SORTING, ORDERING OR ARRANGING GAMES: For example, students have a set of cards with different products on them, and they sort the cards into products found at a grocery store and products found at a department store. Another example could be Bingo!
Warm Up Activity
Types of language games
7. EXCHANGING GAMES: In these games, students barter cards, other objects, or ideas. Many card games fall into this category.
Using games to teach Grammar & Vocabulary
THANKS FOR YOUR ATTENTION!!
WHY use games?
1. Games
add interest
to what students might not find very interesting.
2. Games provide a
context
for meaningful communication.
3. This meaningful communication provides the basis for
comprehensible input and output.
4. The
emotions
aroused when playing games add variety to the sometimes dry, serious process of language instruction.
5. The variety and intensity that games offer may
lower anxiety
and encourage shyer learners to take part.
6. Games can involve all the
basic language skills
7. Games are
student-centered

8. Games provide a means for students to use the language
outside
of class time
9. Games develop their skills in working with
others
10. Games can connect to a variety of
intelligences

WHAT is a game?
BUT...
The competitive nature of games can create a hostile learning environment
Sometimes they expect a tangible reward
Playing games in a classroom can make it a place filled with “good noise”.
TREASURE HUNT!
Follow the clues and find the treasure.
HAPPY FAMILY
INSTRUCTIONS:
The objective is to collect families by asking other players for cards you think they may have.
Whoever collects most sets wins
A player asking for a card must say "please", and a player receiving a card must say "thank you".Anyone who forgets to do this must give back the requested card and the turn passes to the player they were asking.
Rationale
Types of language games
9. ROLE PLAY GAMES: Involve students playing roles that they do not play in real life, while simulations can involve students performing roles that they already play in real life or might be likely to play.
Rationale:

Level:
Beginner to Advanced.
Skills reinforced:
Spelling, Thematic Vocabulary, development of social and personal skills.
Materials
: You can use the game or you can create it.

Procedure:
~The teacher gives the students the “shopping list” and the trolleys.
~The teacher picks up the items in order to complete the trolleys.
~The students add to the trolleys the items picked up by the teacher.

Variations:
~Play with teams or individuals.
~You can create variations of this game using another thematic vocabulary
~Another variation could be the Bingo.

Suggestions:
~Increase the difficulty of the vocabulary.


Rationale:

Level
: Beginner to Advanced.
Skills reinforced
: Spelling, Thematic Vocabulary, Speaking, Grammar.
Materials
: You can use the game or you can create it.

Procedure
:
~Students have to guess the main word, avoiding the words listed in the card.

Variations
:
~Play with teams or individuals.
~You can create variations of this game using another vocabulary.

Suggestions
:
~Increase the difficulty of the vocabulary.
Conclusion
• Games are a welcome break from the usual routine of the language class.
• They are motivating and challenging.
• Learning a language requires a great deal of effort. Games help students to make and sustain the effort of learning.
• Games provide language practice in the various skills - speaking, writing, listening and reading.
• They encourage students to interact and communicate.
• They create a meaningful context for language use

· Games can be a very worthwhile teaching element. A successful game is successful because for the reason that it is based on specific time allocation, it has clear relevance to the material, there is appropriateness to all members of the class, and ultimately, the enjoyment of the learners is increased through their actively engaging with the language.
Theory
WHEN to use games
Beginning: warm-up
End: fill-in extra time
Occasional: add variety
PPP: practice and production
Revise and recycle
HOW to use games
1. The
what
and the
which
2. Does it
suit
you?
3.
Adapt
or die
4. It's all in
preparation
5. Make it as
clear
as possible
6.
Involve
, involve, involve
7. Make it
rewarding
8. It's all in
timing
9. There can be
too much
of a good thing
Types of language games
3. GUESSING GAMES: These are a variation on information gap games. Participants have to guess a word or topic by asking YES/NO questions. For example, the
Who am I?
game.
Rationale:

Level:
Beginner to Advanced.
Skills reinforced:
Vocabulary, interrogative structures (using polarity-type questions and several tense forms) to seek for information in real-life context.
Materials:
Cards and headbands
.
You can also use post-it notes.

Procedure:
~One of the students in the group wears a headband with a card showing a word, he/she is not able to see. The object of the game is for this student to discover WHO AM I by asking yes or no questions to the other students in their group. If there is more than one group playing the game.
~Each student can ask only one question to each other student in the group.
~The question must be phrased so it can be answered with a Yes or No.
~The first student to discover his/her identity can be given a small prize, an additional point on a quiz, or rewarded in some other appropriate way

Variations:
~You can create variations of this game using another vocabulary.

Suggestions:
~
Increase the difficulty.
Level
: Beginner to Intermediate.
Skills reinforced
: Spelling, Thematic Vocabulary, Speaking and Grammar
Materials
: You can use cards or you can create them.

Procedure
:
~Students have to practice the question structure: Do you have...? and the use of polite words

Variations
:
~Play with teams or pairs.
~You can create variations of this game using another vocabulary.

Suggestions
:
~Increase the difficulty of the vocabulary.
Types of language games
5. MATCHING GAMES: Participants need to find a match for a word, picture or card. In the classic memory game, each person turn over two cards at a time with the goal of turning over a matching pair, by using the memory.
MIME GAME
Rationale:

Level:
Beginner to Advanced
Skills Reinforced:
vocabulary identification and memory recall
Materials:
index cards

Procedure:
Have the students create matching pairs.
The most common set up would be to have a word on one card, and its
corresponding picture on the other.
Turn the cards face down, and rearrange them so that no pairs are near each other.
Each student takes a turn attempting to find the match.
When a match is made, then he or she gets to go again.
The student with the most pairs wins.

Variations:
Have the students match questions and answers, or opposites.

Other suggestions:
The cards can be used for many other things besides just memory.
For example: as flashcards, or students could chose the cards randomly and have to use them in a logical sentence or short story.

Rationale
Level: Beginner to Advanced.
Skills reinforced: Spelling, Thematic Vocabulary, Speaking and Grammar
Materials: no materials need

Procedure:
~Students have to guess what one of them is performing

Variations:
~Play with teams.
~You can create variations of this game using another vocabulary.

Suggestions:
~Increase the difficulty of the vocabulary.
Theory
1. Based on a
learning objective
. This gives teachers a focus point for the FORMAT, SKILLS INVOLVED & MATERIAL COVERED.
2. They give the player
control
over destiny. Increases MOTIVATION, RESPONSIBILITY and improves DECISION MAKING SKILLS.
3. Include
ACHIEVABLE challenges
. Players should succeed.
4. FUN, INTERESTING, thus MOTIVATING.
(Emotion + Excitement = Students forget they are learning)
5. Based on
reality
.
They practice without
stress
from any real situation.
Support
form peers, and
time
to think and react.
6. Require
interaction
between peers in similar situation.
7. Include everyone: SOCIAL INTERACTION, GOOD COMMUNICATION & SENSE OF COMMUNITY.
Types of language games
Classifying them is difficult because categories overlap. Hadfield (1999):
1. LINGUISTIC GAMES: Focus on accuracy. (ex. supply the correct antonym)
2. COMMUNICATIVE GAMES: Focus on successful exchange of information & ideas. (ex. identify differences)
This taxonomy has many more categories. Some games can contain elements of more than one type:
Types of language games
4. SEARCH GAMES: These games are another variant on two-way information gap games, with everyone giving and seeking information. FIND SOMEONE WHO is a well known example.
Rationale:
Level: Beginner to Advanced.
Skills reinforced: Reading and writing [Vocabulary, grammar (interrogative structures)], speaking (fluency).
Materials: Grids.

Procedure:
Students are given a grid. The task is to fill in all the cells in the grid with the same as a classmate who fits that cell.
Students can circulate, asking and answering questions to complete their own grid and help classmates complete theirs.

Variations:
- You can create variations of this game using another vocabulary.

Suggestions:
- Increase the difficulty of the vocabulary.
- Be aware of the level of noise created while doing the exercise.
Types of language games
6. LABELLING GAMES: These are a form of matching, in that participants can match labels and/or pictures.
PHRASAL PARTNERS
~ It is a pairing game.
~ Students are divided into two groups called VERBS and PREPOSITIONS.
~ Verbs have to find partners to form PHRASAL VERBS.
~ The game ends with partners making sentences with the phrasal verbs.

Rationale:
Level: Pre-Intermediate.
Skills reinforced: Grammar.
Materials: Cards.

Procedure:
~ Students are divided into two groups (VERBS and PREPOSITIONS).
~ Each verb has to find a matching preposition.
~ The pair then run to the board and write their pair name. (If two verbs want the same partner, the pair that can think of a grammatical sentences quicker keeps the partner.)
~Each group says aloud the sentence.

Variations:
~ You can do the same game with adjectives and nouns, or another grammatical point.
~ Play with teams or individually to form pairs.
Suggestions:
~ Increase the difficulty.
~ Be aware of the noise produced by students when pairing and running.
Types of language games
8. BOARD GAMES: Scrabble is one of the most popular board games that specifically highlights language.
The units reinforced are: vocabulary, spelling, anagramming, strategy, counting, bluffing, probability.
WHAT is a
GOOD
game
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