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SPANISH CULTURE

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by

Javier Marquez-Olamendi

on 5 February 2014

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Transcript of SPANISH CULTURE

SPANISH CULTURE
MYTHS AND FOLKLORE
Sports
Most popular sports in Spain:

Soccer
Bullfighting
Basketball
Tennis
Golf
Skiing
Formula One Racing
Futsal ("hall football")
Other sports in Spain:
Rugby
Handball
Baseball
Motor sports
Cycling
Roller Hockey
Basque and Valencian pelota
MUSIC IN DIFFERENT REGIONS
Greeting
In Spain you shake hands with those who are not known well. you exchange a kiss on each cheek, starting with the right cheek known as "Dos besos" for those that are known well. For men it is a quick embrace of a black slap.
Gift Giving
Some spanish gift giving customs if invited to a house or anywhere in particular:
-Chocolates
-Deserts items such as pastries
-A bottle of high quality wine
Flowers are only given or sent for special celebrations usally in odd numbers except for the number 13.
Funerals

Funerals in Spain usually occur with in 24 hours of the death. what is usually brought to a funeral in Spain is flowers/wreaths/music during the service.
Housing
Most homes are adaptable and traditional. Spain consist of lots of small apartments as well as narrow streets.
Some houses
Apartments
Streets
Body Adornments
In Spain body Adornments are not bizarre, well at least to use they usually just consist of a piercing on the ear or on the nose. Bracelets are worn a lot to.
Family
Household size in Spain is typically 4 (2 children). Life Spain is very family oriented. They have "ciesta" every day at 3 PM and it is expected that the entire immediate family is to be there. And on every Sunday most families get together and have ciesta together and spend the day together. Families love each other greatly, and express it every day.
Dancing
Something Spain is very famous for is for there Flamenco dance.
Cooking
What is often eaten in Spain is "Tapas" which is Spanish Chorizo and Serrano Ham Pizza. Tapas usually consist of more variety's of food in it.
1. Andalusia
2. Aragon
3. Asturias, Cantabria and Galicia
4. Balearic Islands
5. Basque Country
6. Canary Islands
7. Castile, Madrid and León
8. Catalonia
9. Extremadura
10. Murcia
11. Navarre and La Rioja
12. Valencia
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MUSIC IN ANDALUSIA
FLAMENCO
Panda de Verdiales
Feria de abril de Sevilla
MUSIC IN ARAGON
Aragonese jota
Guitarro
Asturias, Cantabria and Galicia
Galician gaiteiros
(Bagpipe players)
Tabor
(three hole)
pipe players
Heredeiros da Crus
(rock band in Galicia)
(heirs of the cross)
MUSIC OF Balearic Islands
Flabiol (five hole pipe)
Xeremies
(bagpipe)
Privilege (club in Ibiza)
Basa-Jaun (Homme de Bouc): An ogre of the Basque in northwestern Spain, whose name means “lord of the woods”. He is given credit for teaching mankind the art of agriculture and forging. He lives high in the Pyrenean Mountains, in the woods and caves where he protects the flocks of sheep and goats from predators and thunderstorms. But he has a malignant nature and will trap and torture humans if they stray into his domain. In some stories, he is described as a spirit that is mischievous, but not malignant.
Caballucos del diablo: ”Devil’s small horses”. In Cantabria (northern Spain), it is told that those creatures appear with a terrific cry at Saint John’s Eve, amongst fire and smoke. There are seven winged horses, of seven different colors: red, orange, yellow, white, black, blue and green. The red one is the strongest, and their leader. All the horses are mounted by demons. During this one night, they roam the land, in search of four-leaf clovers, that are rare, and considered as powerful lucky charms. The mission of the horses and riders is to destroy as many four-leaf clovers as they can find, to avoid people searching them next morning to benefit from this gift.
CHUPACABRA!!!
Ijanas: Female creatures of Cantabrian (northern Spain) folklore, they live in caves, are always naked, and have breasts so long, that to walk they must put them over their shoulders. Very greedy and unquiet, they spend their time looking for food, destroying beehives in search of honey and entering houses without permission. Yet, unless bothered, they are not particularly dangerous, just very much annoying.
TRANSPORTATION
The Spanish road system is mainly centralized, with six highways connecting Madrid to the Basque Country, Catalonia, Valencia, West Andalusia, Extremadura and Galicia. Spain aims to put one million electric cars on the road by 2014 as part of the government's plan to save energy and boost energy efficiency.

AVE high-speed trains
Spain has the most extensive high-speed rail network in Europe, and the second-most extensive in the world after China. As of October 2010, Spain has a total of 3,500 km (2,174.80 mi) of high-speed tracks with the trains reaching speeds up to 300 km/h (187 mph). On average, the Spanish high-speed train is the fastest one in the world, followed by the Japanese bullet train and the French TGV. Regarding punctuality, it is second in the world (98.54% on-time arrival) after the Japanese Shinkansen (99%). Should the aims of the AVE program (Spanish high speed trains) be met, by 2020 Spain will have 7000 km (4300 mi) of high-speed trains linking almost all provincial cities to Madrid in less than three hours and Barcelona within four hours. There are 47 public airports in Spain. The busiest one is the airport of Madrid (Barajas), being the world's 15th busiest airport, as well as the European Union's fourth busiest. The airport of Barcelona (El Prat) is also important, being the world's 31st-busiest airport.
LANGUAGE
RELIGION
red: Spanish
magenta: Catalan/Valencian
green: Aranese, Asturian, Extremaduran
yellow: Galician
Roman Catholicism is the largest denomination of Christianity present in Spain by far. According to an February 2013 study by the Spanish Center of Sociological Research about 81.2% of Spaniards self-identify as Catholics, 1.1% other faith, and about 13.6% identify with no religion. Most Spaniards do not participate regularly in religious worship. This same study shows that of the Spaniards who identify themselves as religious, 59% goes to mass few times a year, 18% go to mass many times a year, 9% some time per month and 16% every Sunday or multiple times per week.
EDUCATION
ECONOMY
13th best economy in the world
Currency=1 Euro=100 eurocent
Unemployment=26.83%
Labour force=23 million
Average net salary=18,679 €
($24,293.98) yearly
Main industries: machine tools, metals and metal manufactures, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, shipbuilding, automobiles, Tourism, textiles and apparel (including footwear), food and beverages.
Cuatro Torres Business Area in Madrid
Pre-school=3 to 6 years old
Primary school=6 to 12 years old
Compulsory Secondary Education=12 to 16 years old
Post-Compulsory Schooling=16 to 18 years old
State schools (colegios públicos)
Privately run schools funded by the State (colegios concertados)
Purely private schools (colegios privados)
Spain has 75 universities, of which 50 are established on a public basis and 25 on a private basis. Of the 50 public universities, 48 fall under the authority of Autonomous Communities while 2 fall under the Ministry of Education and Science. Of the 25 private universities, 7 belong to the Catholic Church.
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