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Poetic Review

A verse from The Running Man
by

David de Vink

on 3 September 2012

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Transcript of Poetic Review

The Silkworms, Stanza 5 Poetic Review Stanza 5 They stir, they think they will go. Then they remember It was forbidden, forbidden, ever to go out; The Hands are on guard outside like claps of thunder, The ancestral voice says Don't, and they do not. Still the night calls them to unimaginable bliss But there is a terror around them, the vast, the abyss, The verse has a very obvious meaning that portrays the situation and predicament of the silkworms. What it means Why its my favorite: The rhythm and tone that the verse creates provoke
strong emotions and feelings that capture the imagination and mind. The verse really makes you think about the silkworms situation and life. The whole verse is talking about how the silkworms yearn to leave there enclosure but their instincts say they can not. 'The Hands' signify Tom Leyton waiting
outside of the box, ready to grab up any silkworm that finds itself outside. The second last line of the stanza shows the temptation that freedom offers the silkworms even though they know they can not take it. Finally the last line refers to the vulnerability of the silkworms when they leave the relative safety of their box. An interesting poetic device I found in the verse was the rhyming at the end of the last two lines. It saw 'abyss' and 'bliss' rhyming together which is an
interesting combination as they are sort of complete
opposites in terms of word emotion. Bliss is the epitome of happiness and abyss is a never ending fall which gives a long, drawn out, depressing feeling. The 'vast' and 'abyss' are words to describe the emptiness and void beyond the confines of the silkworm box. Thanks for listening THE END Thanks to Douglas Stewart for the poem.
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