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Copy of Navigation of Canadian Geese

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by

Diane Ryder

on 15 February 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Navigation of Canadian Geese

Navigation
of
Canadian Geese

Background
Signature "V" formation
Migrate twice a year
Takes anywhere from 1-12 days
Research Question:
Do Canadian Geese (Branta Canadensis) rely on recognition of visual landmarks or do they follow the leader of the formation in order to navigate to their destination?
Prevent interfering with travel patterns

Insight to other traveling patterns of pack animals

Controlling Goose population location
Significance
Hypothesis
If we test the migration tendencies of Canadian Geese in order to determine if they navigate using landmarks, or by being led, we believe we will find that the Geese use a combination of the two to reach their destination.
Variables
Independent:


Artificial Landmarks

Presence of "Lead Goose"
Dependent:
Success of reaching destination
Subjects:
We will follow a known and tracked population in Manitoba, Canada down to Rochester, Minnesota,
Overview:
2 years to test 2 variables
Both in autumn as a control
Same population of geese
Set up temporary research centers in Ontario and Rochester

Part 1: False Landmarks
Procedure:
i. Create false bodies of water/ significant landmarks to lay along the geese’s travel route
ii. Travel to Manitoba, Canada, leaving the false landmarks along the known route
iii. Check the tracking systems already on the geese, redo if needed
iv. Wait for goose departure, then follow and stop when they do
v. Observe reaction of geese upon reaching false landmark
vi. Move landmark further down the route as the geese rest
vii. Repeat steps iv. v. and vi. until they have reached Rochester, Minnesota

Part 2: Leader Removal
i. Travel to Manitoba, Canada, leaving the same false landmarks along the known route
ii. Check the tracking systems already on the geese, redo if needed
iii. Wait for goose departure, then follow and stop when they do
iv. When stopped, tag the goose in the lead of the formation and remove it from the group
v. Observe reaction of geese before takeoff the next day
vi. Wait for goose departure, then follow and stop when they do
vii. Return the lead goose after a full day of traveling without it
viii. When stopped, tag the new goose in the lead of the formation that day and remove it from the group.
ix. Repeat steps v. through viii. until they have reached Rochester, Minnesota

Procedure:
Problems With Population
Fecal Matter
Traffic
Hunting
Cost
$450,000
Vans
Temporary Labs
Landmarks
Personnel
GPS Tracking Systems
Local Fees/Taxes
Goose Lodging & Care
Miscellaneous
Thank You
Full transcript